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Internals

Oracle 12.2 wait event ‘PGA memory operation’

When sifting through a sql_trace file from Oracle version 12.2, I noticed a new wait event: ‘PGA memory operation’:

WAIT #0x7ff225353470: nam='PGA memory operation' ela= 16 p1=131072 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=484 tim=15648003957

The current documentation has no description for it. Let’s see what V$EVENT_NAME says:

SQL> select event#, name, parameter1, parameter2, parameter3, wait_class 
  2  from v$event_name where name = 'PGA memory operation';

EVENT# NAME                                  PARAMETER1 PARAMETER2 PARAMETER3 WAIT_CLASS
------ ------------------------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------------
   524 PGA memory operation                                                   Other

Well, that doesn’t help…

Advanced Oracle memory profiling using pin tool ‘pinatrace’

In my previous post, I introduced Intel Pin. If you are new to pin, please follow this link to my previous post on how to set it up and how to run it.

One of the things you can do with Pin, is profile memory access. Profiling memory access using the pin tool ‘pinatrace’ is done in the following way:

$ cd ~/pin/pin-3.0-76991-gcc-linux
$ ./pin -pid 12284 -t source/tools/SimpleExamples/obj-intel64/pinatrace.so

The pid is a pid of an oracle database foreground process. Now execute something in the session you attached pin to and you find the ‘pinatrace’ output in $ORACLE_HOME/dbs:

Introduction to Intel Pin

This blogpost is an introduction to Intel’s Pin dynamic instrumentation framework. Pin and the pintools were brought to my attention by Mahmoud Hatem in his blogpost Tracing Memory access of an oracle process: Intel PinTools. The Pin framework provides an API that abstracts instruction-set specifics (on the CPU layer). Because this is a dynamic binary instrumentation tool, it requires no recompiling of source code. This means we can use it with programs like the Oracle database executable.
The Pin framework download comes with a set of pre-created tools called ‘Pintools’. Some of these tools are really useful for Oracle investigation and research.

Oracle 12cR2: Database parameters

For those in a desperate need to learn all 4841 database parameter variations of the…

Watching is in the eye of the beholder

Recently I was investigating the inner working of Oracle. One of the things that is fundamental to the Oracle database is the SCN (system change number). SCNs are used to synchronise changes in the database. There is one source for SCNs in every instance (kcbgscn; the global or current SCN in the fixed SGA), and there are multiple tasks for which Oracle keeps track of synchronisation using SCNs. A few of these tasks for which Oracle stores and uses SCNs to keep track of progress are on disk SCN and lwn SCN.

This blogpost is about some oddities I found when using gdb (the GNU debugger) to watch memory locations of a running Oracle database. This should not be done on a production instance, and is purely for research purposes. Only use the methods mentioned in this article if you are absolutely sure what you are doing, and/or if you are using an Oracle instance that can be crashed and can be restored.

PL/SQL context switch, part 2

This is the second blogpost on using PL/SQL inside SQL. If you landed on this page and have not read the first part, click this link and read that first. I gotten some reactions on the first article, of which one was: how does this look like with ‘pragma udf’ in the function?

Pragma udf is a way to speed up using PL/SQL functions in (user defined function), starting from version 12. If you want to know more about the use of pragma udf, and when it does help, and when it doesn’t, please google for it.

create or replace function add_one( value number ) return number is
        pragma udf;
        l_value number(10):= value;
begin
        return l_value+1;
end;
/

select sum(add_one(id)) from t2;

As you can see, really the only thing you have to do is add ‘pragma udf’ in the declaration section of PL/SQL.

Oracle 12 and latches, part 3

This post is about manually calling and freeing a shared latch. Credits should go to Andrey Nikolaev, who has this covered in his presentation which was presented at UKOUG Tech 15. I am very sorry to see I did miss it.

Essentially, if you follow my Oracle 12 and shared latches part 2 blogpost, which is about shared latches, I showed how to get a shared latch:

SQL> oradebug setmypid
Statement processed.
SQL> oradebug call ksl_get_shared_latch 0x94af8768 1 0 2303 16
Function returned 1

Which works okay, but leaves a bit of a mess when freed:

[Oracle] Understanding the Oracle code instrumentation (wait interface) - A deep dive into what is really measured

Introduction

This blog post is inspired by a question from an attendee of Sigrid Keydana's DOAG 2015 conference session called "Raising the fetchsize, good or bad? Exploring memory management in Oracle JDBC 12c". Basically it was a question about what the wait event "SQL*Net more data to client" represents and what it really measures. In general you may use the following steps, if you don't know what a particular wait event means:

STANDARD date considerations in Oracle SQL and PL/SQL

Most of us know that the Oracle DATE datatype has upper and lower limits. From the Oracle 11g Database Concepts manual:

Oracle Database can store dates in the Julian era, ranging from January 1, 4712 BCE through December 31, 9999 CE (Common Era, or ‘AD’). Unless BCE (‘BC’ in the format mask) is specifically used, CE date entries are the default.

I never believe 100% anything I read, so I’ll try that. I’ll set my session to show dates with the AD/BC indicator and step back in time:

Oracle 12 and latches

Oracle DBAs who are so old that they remember the days before Oracle 11.2 probably remember the tuning efforts for latches. I can still recall the latch number for cache buffers chains from the top of my head: number 98. In the older days this was another number, 157.

But it seems latches have become less of a problem in the modern days of Oracle 11.2 and higher. Still, when I generate heavy concurrency I can see some latch waits. (I am talking about you and SLOB mister Closson).

I decided to look into latches on Oracle 12.1.0.2 instance on Oracle Linux 7. This might also be a good time to go through how you think they work for yourself, it might be different than you think or have been taught.