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A look into Oracle redo, part 1: redo allocation latches

This will be a series of posts about Oracle database redo handling. The database in use is Oracle version 12.2.0.1, with PSU 170814 applied. The operating system version is Oracle Linux Server release 7.4. In order to look into the internals of the Oracle database, I use multiple tools; very simple ones like the X$ views and oradebug, but also advanced ones, quite specifically the intel PIN tools (https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/pin-a-dynamic-binary-instrumentation-tool). One of these tools is ‘debugtrace’, which contains pretty usable output on itself (a indented list of function calls and returns), for which I essentially filter out some data, another one is ‘pinatrace’, which does not produce directly usable output, because it provides instruction pointer and memory addresses.

Oracle database block checksum XOR algorithm explained

Recently I’ve started to write my own clone of BBED to have something handy and useful in extreme cases when you have to go deep and fix stuff on low level (I have only like 2 such cases a year but each time it is really fun and a nice money </p />
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12c Multitenant internals: PDB_PLUG_IN_VIOLATIONS

In the previous post https://blog.dbi-services.com/12c-multitenant-internals-pdb-replay-ddl-for-common-users I’ve done some DDL on a common user to show how this is replayed later for PDBs that were not opened at that time. But what happens when one of the DDL fails on one PDB?

12c Multitenant internals: PDB replay DDL for common users

In multitenant, you can create common Users, Roles, and Profiles. You create them in CDB$ROOT, with the CONTAINER=ALL clause (which is optional because it is the only possible value when connected to CDB$ROOT) but they are visible to all containers. As the goal of multitenant is to avoid to duplicate common metadata to all containers, You may think that they are visible through those magic metadata links. But that’s actually wrong: they are simply replicated with a very simple mechanism: the DDL for common objects is replayed into each user PDB.

I’m connected to CDB2’s CDB$ROOT and I have two pluggable databases:

SQL> show pdbs
 
CON_ID CON_NAME OPEN MODE RESTRICTED
------ -------- ---- ---- ----------
2 PDB$SEED READ ONLY NO
3 PDB1 READ WRITE NO
4 PDB2 MOUNTED

PDB1 is opened and PDB2 is closed.

Introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2: a look into latches again

This post is an introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2, which is a tool to annotate the output of the Intel Pin tools ‘pinatrace’ tool.

The pinatrace tool generates a file with every single memory access of a process. Please realise what this means: this is every single read from main memory or write to main memory from the CPU. This allows you to get an understanding what happens within a C function. This means you can determine what information or data is accessed in what function. Needless to say this is a tool for internals investigations and research, not something for normal daily database maintenance and support. Also, the performance of the process that you attached to is severely impacted, and it can only be turned off by stopping the process. Do not use this on a production database, use this at your own risk for research and investigational purposes only.

ODBVv2 – ghostdata busters

Some time ago I wrote a simple tool to learn about Oracle data block internals – ODBV.
The series of articles can be found here: http://blog.ora-600.pl/?s=odbv&submit= and the github repo is here: https://github.com/ora600pl/odbv

This is not a production tool but during the last session in Birmingham at UKOUG_TECH17 – where I was doing a presentation using this tool – I came to the conclusion that with a little bit of work it could be used to trace ghost data in a database.

What is ghost data? This is very simple – each time we delete something or truncate or move, Oracle database is not removing data from our datafile – the blocks are "marked" for reuse and are not associated with any logical object in a database, but our data is still there.

Multitenant internals: INT$ and INT$INT$ views

This month, I’ll talk – with lot of demos – about multitenant internals at DOAG conference. CaptureMultitenantInternals

Multitenant dictionary: what is consolidated and what is not

The documentation says that for Reduction of duplication and Ease of database upgrade the Oracle-supplied objects such as data dictionary table definitions and PL/SQL packages are represented only in the root.

Unfortunately, this is only partly true. System PL/SQL packages are only in root but system table definition are replicated into all PDBs.

This post is an extension of a previous blog post which was on 12cR1. This one is on 12cR2.

Oracle C functions annotations

Warning! This is a post about Oracle database internals for internals lovers and researchers. For normal, functional administration, this post serves no function. The post shows a little tool I created which consists of a small database I compiled with Oracle database C function names and a script to query it. The reason that keeping such a database makes sense in the first place, is because the Oracle C functions for the Oracle database are setup in an hierarchy based on the function name. This means you can deduct what part of the execution you are in by looking at the function name; for example ‘kslgetl’ means kernel service lock layer, get latch.

To use this, clone git repository at https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/ora_functions.git

Direct path insert and IOTs

(Please tell me that I’m not the only one who thinks "Index Organized Table" instead of "Internet Of Things" when hearing IOT…)

This post is inspired by Connor McDonald and his blog post from a year ago about direct mode operations and IOTs.
You can read it here: https://connor-mcdonald.com/2016/07/04/direct-mode-operations-on-iots/amp/

While writing a redo parser for V00D00 I had to investigate this subject very closely from a redo log perspective. And this will be the subject of my 10-minute lightning talk at Oak Table World 2017 at Oracle Open World!