Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 30 guests online.

Recent comments

kernel

How much memory is truly used by my Oracle instance?

There are many posts about the amount of memory that is taken by the Oracle database executables and the database SGA and PGA. The reason for adding yet another one on this topic is a question I recently gotten, and the complexities which surrounds memory usage on modern systems. The intention for this blogpost is to show a tiny bit about page sharing of linux for private pages, then move on to shared pages, and discuss how page allocation looks like with Oracle ASMM (sga_target or manual memory).

The version of linux in this blogpost is Oracle Linux 7.2, using kernel: 4.1.12-37.6.3.el7uek.x86_64 (UEK4)
The version of the Oracle database software is 12.1.0.2.160719 (july 2016).

Investigating kernel dives using ftrace.

This blogpost is about using the linux ftrace kernel facility. If you are familiar with ftrace and specifically the function_graph tracer, you might already be aware of this functionality. This is Linux specific, and this facility is at least available in kernel 2.6.39 (Oracle’s UEK2 kernel).

The Oracle wait interface granularity of measurement

The intention of this blogpost is to show the Oracle wait time granularity and the Oracle database time measurement granularity. One of the reasons for doing this, is the Oracle database switched from using the function gettimeofday() up to version 11.2 to clock_gettime() to measure time.

This switch is understandable, as gettimeofday() is a best guess of the kernel of the wall clock time, while clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC,…) is an monotonic increasing timer, which means it is more precise and does not have the option to drift backward, which gettimeofday() can do in certain circumstances, like time adjustments via NTP.

The first thing I wanted to proof, is the switch of the gettimeofday() call to the clock_gettime() call. This turned out not to be as simple as I thought.

If you’re not using hugepages, you’re doing it wrong!

Well, there’s been a bit of a delay in with my planned testing of dbVisit Replicate and Oracle GoldenGate for zero-downtime upgrades. So, I’ll be (hopefully) getting back to that within a couple of weeks.

Meanwhile, I recently ran across a discussion on the Oracle OTN Community forums, asking about performance and hugepages configuration, here in the Oracle Database – General Questions Forum.

I think my answer bears repeating, so, here is a slightly modified version:

First, I’m going to take a strong position on hugepages. I’m going to go as far as to say, for any non-trivial SGA size, if you’re not using hugepages, you’re doing it wrong. There are three main points to consider.

When the Oracle wait interface isn’t enough, part 2: understanding measurements.

In my blogpost When the oracle wait interface isn’t enough I showed how a simple asynchronous direct path scan of a table was spending more than 99% of it’s time on CPU, and that perf showed me that 68% (of the total elapsed time) was spent on a spinlock unlock in the linux kernel which was called by io_submit().

This led to some very helpful comments from Tanel Poder. This blogpost is a materialisation of his comments, and tests to show the difference.

First take a look at what I gathered from ‘perf’ in the first article:

Building vmware-tools in your Oracle Linux UEK3 VM

This is a quick writeup of an oddity I found while trying to install the vmwareware tools in an Oracle Linux host with the UEK3 kernel enabled (which is by default).

This is what is encountered during the vmware tools installation dialog when running vmwaretools.pl:

Searching for a valid kernel header path...
The path "" is not a valid path to the 3.8.13-16.2.2.el6uek.x86_64 kernel 
headers.
Would you like to change it? [yes]

The building of vmware tools fail because the kernel headers can not be found: the installer doesn’t see the kernel headers, whilst you probably installed it (it’s the kernel-uek-devel package belonging to the running kernel).