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Foreign Keys and Library Cache Locks

In this post I would like to describe a behavior of Oracle Database that, at least for me, isn’t obvious at all. Actually, it’s something that I can’t explain why it works in that way.

Let’s start by setting the scene by describing the schema I’m using for the following tests. As you can see from the image, there are three tables: one table (PARENT) that is referenced by two other tables (CHILD1 and CHILD2). Schema used for the tests In my case every table is owned by a different schema (P, C1 and C2 respectively). But, the behavior I describe is independent from that fact (i.e. it works in the same way if all tables are owned by the same schema). If you are interested, here is the SQL*Plus script I used to create them.

Does the Parse Time Increase Linearly with the Number Of Child Cursors?

In the last post I discussed a test case generating lot of child cursors. Today I wanted to show you, for the very same test case, that in 11.2 the parse time might increases linearly with the number of child cursors per parent cursor. This is the expected behavior. In fact, to check whether an already available child cursor can be reused, the list of child cursors must be scanned. And, in case no one of the already available child cursors is compatible, every entry needs to be probed.

How Many Children Can a Parent Cursor Have? 1,000,000?

The patch set 11.2.0.3 includes a fix for bug# 10187168 which, in reality, is an enhancement request. Its purpose is to artificially limit the number of child cursors that a parent cursor can have. The concept is quite easy: when a parent cursor reaches _cursor_obsolete_threshold (default value is 100) child cursors the parent cursor is obsoleted and, as a result, a new one is created.

So, as of 11.2.0.3 (or with some PSUs and bundle patches), the answer to the question is: 100.