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Singing The NoCOUG Blues

This is a re-post of an interview between myself and Iggy Fernandez, editor of the Journal of the Northern California Oracle Users Group (NoCOUG), Oracle ACE, OakTable member, blogger, and simply an amazing person.  The interview starts on page 4 of the August 2014 issue of the NoCOUG Journal, and demonstrates how a gifted interviewer can make someone being interviewed more interesting and coherent.

Singing The NoCOUG Blues

You are old, father Gorman (as the young man said) and your hair has become very white. You must have lots of stories. Tell us a story!

Avoiding Regret

After working for a variety of companies in the 1980s, after working for Oracle in the 1990s, after trying (and failing) to build a company with friends at the turn of the century, and after more than a decade working as an independent consultant in this new century, I found myself in a professional dilemma last year.

I know I need to work at least another ten years, probably more like fifteen years, to be able to retire.  I had survived the nastiest economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Great Recession of 2008-2011, while self-employed, and felt ready to take on the economic upswing, so I was confident that I could work steadily as an independent Oracle performance tuning consultant for the next 15 years or more.

Problem was: I was getting bored.

If you want something done, ask a busy person…

This is a re-post I originally made on the ODTUG website on 17-Jan 2013 at the beginning of my two-year term on the board of directors...

This past weekend, I attended my first face-to-face Board of Directors meeting with ODTUG. Monty Latiolais, current president of ODTUG, asked me to let him know if there was anything “less than stellar” about my experience, and I have say the answer is “no”.  It was a stellar experience, all weekend.  Here’s why…

One year at Delphix

It’s been over a year since I leapt into the void.

OK, more than a little melodramatic.  In many respects, I was leaping from the void by joining a promising and exciting startup company like Delphix.

APEX Woman In Technology Award for 2014

Based on the advise of a colleague, and also because of my desire to become more involved in the wider technology community in Colorado, I joined the Colorado Technology Association (CTA) last year.  I had been involved with the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group (RMOUG) for over 20 years, much of that time on the board of directors, including two 3-year stints as president, but I wanted to participate in the wider community beyond my beloved Oracle technology community.

I’ve only attended three CTA events to date, but this past summer I learned that CTA is a great advocate of Women In Technology (WIT) and has done a great deal of work to encourage women to enter the technology industry and to stay in the industry.

Hello Delphix!

After almost 16 years as an independent consultant, with a couple side-steps into the world of small consulting-services startups, I’ve accepted an offer from Delphix, a startup building the future of information technology, enabling agile data management and storage virtualization.

I’m closing EvDBT as a business, since the employee count will reduce from one to zero, and finishing up my consulting engagements, starting with my new employer on 01-May 2014.

Thank you, EvDBT.  You were my lifeboat and my vehicle to a better career and a better life!

15 years of EvDBT

I worked at Oracle Consulting for eight and a half years, from January 1990 until July 1998, starting as a senior consultant and finishing as a technical manager.  In the summer of 1998, I was experiencing a dual crisis in my career, directionally and ethically.

From the directional perspective, Oracle Consulting was sending very clear signals that the way Gary Dodge and I were doing business in the Denver consulting practice was not aligned with corporate goals.  The corporation wanted vertical “centers of expertise” with global and national scope.  In Denver, Gary and I managed about a dozen generalists, with experience ranging from very junior to very senior, who effectively covered all types of technology.  Our goal was to let each person work locally on the type of work they enjoyed, occasionally coercing some to try something different.  Many of us had families, and all of us lived in Colorado for a reason.

Remembering Gary Dodge…

The world lost a remarkable person this week, my friend and mentor Gary Dodge.

He is survived by his wife Luann, to whom he was married 33 years, by his daughter Brigid and by his son Ryan, and by a tight-knit and equally talented and accomplished family.  And by friends and admirers too numerous to count, worldwide.

As long as I knew him, his email signature stated, “Building tomorrow’s legacy systems today, one crisis at a time“, succinctly expressing his dry, lightly-warped sense of humor, suitable even in an uptight business environment.

He is deeply missed.  Thank you, Gary.