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How to setup git as a daemon

This is a quick post on using git on a server. I use my Synology NAS as a fileserver, but also as a git repository server. The default git package for Synology enables git usage on the command line, which means via ssh, or via web-DAV. Both require a logon to do anything with the repository. That is not very handy if you want to clone and pull from the repository in an automated way. Of course there are ways around that (basically setting up password-less authentication, probably via certificates), but I wanted simple, read-only access without authentication. If you installed git on a linux or unix server you get the binaries, but no daemon, which means you can only use ssh if you want to use that server for central git repositories.

Interesting observation about standby redo logs in Data Guard

Some of you might have followed the discussion around the number of standby redo logs on twitter, but since 140 characters are woefully short for the complete story here’s the writeup that prompted the question. This is a test with 12.1.0.2 on virtualised Linux, repeated on a proper platform with physical hardware.

First of all here’s my setup. I have a dbca-based database (CDB, but doesn’t matter) that features 3 groups for its online redo logs. They are all 50 MB in size-important for this test, but not realistic :) Following the Oracle documentation I created n + 1 groups (per thread) on the standby to stop Data Guard broker from complaining about missing standby redo logs (SRL).

The end result was positive, here’s what the broker thinks:

I must install Oracle on Fedora!

Followers of my blog and website know I play around with installations on Fedora for fun. All of my installation guides on Fedora come with a link at the top that points to this disclaimer.

A few times recently I’ve been contacted by people saying their boss, teacher or customer is insisting they install Oracle on Fedora. Rather than repeat myself, I’ve added another point at the bottom of this disclaimer that reads:

Using Ansible for executing Oracle DBA tasks.

This post looks like I am jumping on the bandwagon of IT orchestration like a lot of people are doing. Maybe I should say ‘except for (die hard) Oracle DBA’s’. Or maybe not, it up to you to decide.

Most people who are interested in IT in general will have noticed IT orchestration has gotten attention, especially in the form of Puppet and/or Chef. I _think_ IT orchestration has gotten important with the rise of “web scale” (scaling up and down applications by adding virtual machines to horizontal scale resource intensive tasks), in order to provision/configure the newly added machines without manual intervention, and people start picking it up now to use it for more tasks than provisioning of virtual machines for web applications.

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

How to get insights into the Linux Kernel

This is probably as much a note-to-self as it can possibly be. Recently I have enjoyed some more in-depth research about how the Linux kernel works. To that extent I started fairly low-level. Theoretically speaking, you need to understand the hardware-software interface first before you can understand the upper levels. But in practice you get by with less knowledge. But if you are truly interested in how computers work you might want to consider reading up on some background. Some very knowledgable people I deeply respect have recommended books by David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy. I have these two:

Upgrading clustered Grid Infrastructure to 12.1.0.2 from 12.1.0.1.3

Oracle 12.1.0.2 is out, after lots of announcements the product has finally been released. I had just extended my 12.1.0.1.3 cluster to 3 nodes and was about to apply the July PSU when I saw the news. So why not try and upgrade to the brand new thing?

What struck me at first was the list of new features … Oracle’s patching strategy has really changed over time. I remember the days when Oracle didn’t usually add additional features into point releases. Have a look at the new 12.1.0.2 features and that would possibly qualify to be 12c Release 2…

In summary the upgrade process is actually remarkably simple, and hasn’t changed much since earlier versions of the software. Here are the steps in chronological order.

./runInstaller

I don’t know how often I have type ./ruinInstaller instead of runInstaller, but here you go. This is the first wizard screen after splash screen has disappeared.

Oracle 11gR2 and 12cR1 on Oracle Linux 7

I did a quick update of my Oracle installation articles on Oracle Linux 7. The last time I ran through them was with the beta version OL7 and before the release of 12.1.0.2.

The installation process of 11.2.0.4 on the production release of Oracle Linux 7 hasn’t changed since the beta. The installation of 12.1.0.2 on Oracle Linux 7 is a lot neater than the 12.1.0.1 installation. It’s totally problem free for a basic installation.

You can see the articles here.

Oracle Linux 7 Released

With all the excitement around the release of Oracle Database 12.1.02, it’s easy to forget that there is other stuff going on as well.

I’ve just noticed that Oracle have announced the release of Oracle Linux 7. You can download it now from eDelivery.

Just remember, it takes quite a while to get products certified on this stuff, so although I’ve already tried installations on the beta versions, I would not install any Oracle products on this stuff “for real” until the official certification is announced for each product.

Cheers

Tim…

Implications of threaded_execution = true in 12c

I had an interesting discussion as part of my latest presentation at the UKOUG RAC CIA & Database Combined SIG. Part of my talk was about the implications of the new threaded execution model in Oracle.

Since “we do not use Windows” (except for gaming) I can’t compare the Windows thread model to the new 12c implementation on UNIX. There are however interesting implications when switching to the new model, some of which I’d like to demonstrate here. First of all, threaded execution is not enabled by default. With 12.1.0.1.3 on top of Oracle Restart you get the either all or a subset of the following background and auxiliary processes for a CDB: