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Oracle system V shared memory indicated deleted

This article is written with examples taken from an (virtualised) Oracle Linux 6u6 X86_64 operating system, and Oracle database version 12.1.0.2.1. However, I think the same behaviour is true for Oracle 11 and 10 and earlier versions.

Probably most readers of this blog are aware that a “map” of mapped memory for a process exists for every process in /proc, in a pseudo file called “maps”. If I want to look at my current process’ mappings, I can simply issue:

Understanding enhancements to block cleanouts in Exadata part 2

In part 1 of the series I tried to explain (probably a bit too verbose when it came to session statistics) what the effect is of delayed block cleanout and buffered I/O. In the final example the “dirty” blocks on disk have been cleaned out in the buffer cache, greatly reducing the amount of work to be done when reading them.

Understanding enhancements to block cleanouts in Exadata part 1

Travel time is writing time and I have the perfect setting for a techie post. Actually I got quite excited about the subject causing the article to get a bit longer than initially anticipated. In this part you can read about block cleanouts when using buffered I/O. The next part will show how this works using direct path reads and Smart Scans.

The article ultimately aims at describing the enhancements Exadata brings to the table for direct path reads and delayed block cleanouts. Delayed block cleanouts are described in Jonathan Lewis’s “Oracle Core”, and in one of his blog posts, so here’s just a summary.

The delayed block cleanout

What happens in ASM if usable_file_mb is negative and you lose a failgroup

Having read the excellent post “Demystifying ASM REQUIRED_MIRROR_FREE_MB and USABLE_FILE_MB” again by Harald von Breederode I wanted to see what happens if you create a setup where your usable_file_mb is negative and you actually have to rebalance after a fatal failgroup error. I am using 12.1.0.2.0 on Oracle Linux 6.6/UEK3 in a KVM in case anyone is interested. I/O times aren’t stellar on that environment. It’s Oracle Restart, not clustered ASM.

Note: this post is only applicable if you are using ASM for data protection, e.g. normal or high redundancy. External redundancy is a different thing: if you lose a failgroup in a disk group with external redundancy defined then you are toast. The disk group will dismount on all ASM instances. No disk group = nothing to write to = crash of dependent databases.

Setup

Quick diff for two pieces of text in vim

Sometimes you need to see the difference between two pieces of console output. When I research, this can be two stacktraces, but also /proc//maps and smaps output; really anything. Of course, there’s diff, but the diff output is not very visual. Also, diff doesn’t do diffing between more than two files.

This can be done reasonably simple in vim. Here’s how to do that:
1. start vi; vi
2. do a vertical split using a new buffer; :vnew
3. open the first (left side) file; :r path/file or goto insert mode (esc i) and paste text.
4. goto the second window: ctrl+w ctrl+w
5. open the second (right side) file; :r path/file or goto insert mode (esc i) and paste text.
6. diff the two windows; :windo diffthis
7. turn diff mode off; :windo diffoff

Installing Oracle 12.1.0.2 RAC on Oracle Linux 7-part 2

In the first part of the article series you could read how a kickstart file made the installation of Oracle Linux 7 a lot more bearable. In this part of the series it’s all about configuring the operating system. The installation of Grid Infrastructure and the Oracle database is for another set of posts.

There are quite some differences between Oracle Linux 6 and 7

Installing Oracle 12.1.0.2 RAC on Oracle Linux 7-part 1

Now that 12.1.0.2 is certified on RedHat Linux 7 and spin-off environments it’s time to test the installation of RAC on such a system.

The installation of the OS is different from Oracle Linux 5 and 6-with these distributions was very straight forward how to install the operating system the method has changed significantly in release 7. I won’t cover the complete installation here, as always Tim Hall was quicker than me, but it makes me wonder who signed off the user interface for the partitioning “wizard”… I personally think that the kickstart partitioning-information is a lot easier to understand.

http://oracle-base.com/articles/linux/oracle-linux-7-installation.php

Reading Oracle memory dumps

Every DBA working with the Oracle database must have seen memory dumps in tracefiles. It is present in ORA-600 (internal error) ORA-7445 (operating system error), system state dumps, process state dumps and a lot of other dumps.

This is how it looks likes:

RAC One Node 12c-revisited on ODA 12.1.2.1.0 featuring database on ACFS

Thanks to Andy Colvin (@acolvin) and the Enkitec lab I have been able to get my hands on an ODA X4-2. And since that’s a lot quieter than turning on my own lab server, and also a lot faster I used the environment to test RAC One Node in 12.1.0.2.1. I recently had a question from a customer about the usefulness of the solution and what it brings to the HA table. Well here you go.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 4: Oracle 11.2.0.4 and AMM

This is the 4th post in a series of posts on PGA behaviour of Oracle. Earlier posts are: here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12), here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2) and the quiz on using PGA with AMM, into which this blogpost dives deeper.

As laid out in the quiz blogpost, I have a database with the following specifics:
-Oracle Linux x86_64 6u6.
-Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 4
-Oracle database (single instance) with the following parameter set: memory_target=1G. No other memory related parameters set.