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A performance deep dive into column encryption

Actually, this is a follow up post from my performance deep dive into tablespace encryption. After having investigated how tablespace encryption works, this blogpost is looking at the other encryption option, column encryption. A conclusion that can be shared upfront is that despite they basically perform the same function, the implementation and performance consequences are quite different.

A performance deep dive into tablespace encryption

This is a run through of a performance investigation into Oracle tablespace encryption. These are the versions this test was performed on:

$ cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.8
$ /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1/OPatch/opatch lspatches
24315824;Database PSU 12.1.0.2.161018, Oracle JavaVM Component (OCT2016)
24006101;Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.161018 (24006101)

In this test I created an encrypted tablespace:

SQL> create tablespace is_encrypted datafile size 10m autoextend on next 10m encryption default storage(encrypt);

(this assumes you have setup a master encryption key already)
And I created an encrypted simple heap table with one row:

Using virt-install/KVM and kickstart to create lots of identical VMs quickly

In preparation for an upcoming talk about Oracle 12.2 I am planning on getting my feet wet with the Oracle 12.2 Sharding option. It seems to be a very interesting subject to get into, but like all new subjects, they can be intimidating at first due to their complexity. So why not use the instructions someone has already written down?

Oracle has a nice series of articles about Sharding. I found the Sharding landing page in the Maximum Availability Architecture section on OTN. For the purpose of this blog post I’m intending to follow the “Oracle Sharded Database Deployment with Active Data Guard using CREATE SHARD method for On-Premises – Cookbook”, available from the aforementioned landing page.

Little things worth knowing: Executing RDA on RAC

Result! I have finally been able to gather a complete RDA (Oracle Remote Diagnostic Agent) output on my 2 node RAC system. After consulting the relevant documentation on MOS-which is spread over at least 42 Doc IDs-I found them not to be very helpful to the degree that some of what I read is actually wrong or contradicting. I put together a short note, primarily to myself, to remind me of the process. I hope you find it useful, too.

The RDA version I used for this post is 8.14.x from MOS March 4th 2017. My RAC nodes are based on Oracle Linux 7.3/UEK 4.

Starting the data collection

New Events for Data Guard and Synchronous Redo Transport in 12c (2)

After the baseline has been established in the first part of this series it’s time to measure the effect of the network in this part. The second test will introduce an interesting feature: Using Linux’s own Traffic Shaper/Quality of Services module I will add a delay of 100ms to the Data Guard network interface card (NIC) to slow things down a little.

WARNING: this is of course a lab or VM-only situation. I can’t exert control over wire quality in my (own) switches, hence some software magic is needed on my virtual ones. This post is intended to be merely for educational purposes, not for use at work.

I am continuing to use the 2 node RAC 12.1.0.2.170117 primary database on Oracle Linux 7 with UEK 4 and an identical RAC to host my standby database.

Oracle 12.2 wait event ‘PGA memory operation’

When sifting through a sql_trace file from Oracle version 12.2, I noticed a new wait event: ‘PGA memory operation’:

WAIT #0x7ff225353470: nam='PGA memory operation' ela= 16 p1=131072 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=484 tim=15648003957

The current documentation has no description for it. Let’s see what V$EVENT_NAME says:

SQL> select event#, name, parameter1, parameter2, parameter3, wait_class 
  2  from v$event_name where name = 'PGA memory operation';

EVENT# NAME                                  PARAMETER1 PARAMETER2 PARAMETER3 WAIT_CLASS
------ ------------------------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------------
   524 PGA memory operation                                                   Other

Well, that doesn’t help…

New Events for Data Guard and Synchronous Redo Transport in 12c (1)

I may have said it before but I consider presenting and teaching a great way to expand one’s knowledge: first of all it requires me to really understand a subject. Secondly, when presenting, you get lots of interesting questions that can turn into blog posts like this one.

Lately I have been asked about the impact of synchronous log shipping to a physical standby database. I was sure there was an effect to be observed, depending most likely on the network latency between systems but I didn’t have any evidence I could pull out of the hat to back up my thoughts. So what better than trying! I also read that some of the events have changed in 12c, and wanted to make them visible. My environment is based on the 2 node RAC primary/2 node RAC standby configuration I wrote about in my previous posts.

Since their initial setup I upgraded the cluster to 12.1.0.2.170117 for Clusterware and RDBMS.

Creating a RAC 12.1 Data Guard Physical Standby environment (4)

In the previous three parts of this series a lot of preparation work, needed for the configuration of Data Guard, was performed. In this part of the mini-series they all come to fruition. Using the Data Guard broker a switchover operation will be performed. A couple of new features in 12c make this easier. According to the “Changes in This Release for Oracle Data Guard Concepts and Administration” chapter of the 12.1 Data Guard Concepts and Administration guide:

When [you, ed.] perform a switchover from an Oracle RAC primary database to a physical standby database, it is no longer necessary to shut down all but one primary database instance.

I have always wanted to test that in a quiet moment…

Performing in the cloud – network latency

To me, ‘cloud computing’ is renting a compute resource to perform a task. In order to use that compute resource, you need to instruct it to do something, which is typically done via the network. If the task the compute resource needs to fulfil is being an application server or being a client or both in the case of an application server that uses an Oracle database, the network latency between the client of the database and the database server is a critical property.

An introduction to Performance Co Pilot, part 2.

This second blogpost on Performance Co Pilot or PCP in short is about visualisation. In case you haven’t read the first part, here it is, which describes how it works, why you should use it, and how you can install it.

Pmchart.
One way of visualising PCP is using the pmchart utility. The pmchart utility is installed via the pcp-gui package (yum install pcp-gui). The pmchart utility uses X to display a window and draw lines, bar graphs, area graphs, etc. in a sense alike the performance manager on Microsoft Windows. You can select the individual performance statistics PCP measures, which can be viewed and investigated with pminfo, for example kernel.all.cpu.user: