linux

Oracle C functions annotations

Warning! This is a post about Oracle database internals for internals lovers and researchers. For normal, functional administration, this post serves no function. The post shows a little tool I created which consists of a small database I compiled with Oracle database C function names and a script to query it. The reason that keeping such a database makes sense in the first place, is because the Oracle C functions for the Oracle database are setup in an hierarchy based on the function name. This means you can deduct what part of the execution you are in by looking at the function name; for example ‘kslgetl’ means kernel service lock layer, get latch.

To use this, clone git repository at https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/ora_functions.git

Linux for the SQL Server DBA- Part I

For the Oracle DBA, Linux is life.  When I was at Oracle, Linux projects were the easy part of my job, unlike the ones on Windows, AIX, HP-UX and at times, even Solaris.  You knew the Linux ones received the most love from development, had the most time towards patching and received attention if there was a bug.

Changes to the Oracle preinstall RPMs in OL 7.3 and OL 7.4

For quite some time now Oracle has documented the use of the so-called preinstall RPMs to prepare Oracle Linux for the installation of the Oracle database software. I think that’s a great idea if the settings applied by the RPM fit your environment. If I find the time, I’ll write a blog post about what it does specifically in a little while. It definitely fits my lab environment, and I regularly kickstart my OL 7 VMs specifying the preinstall RPM in the %packages section.

When upgrading the current base image from Oracle Linux 7.2 to Oracle 7.4/Oracle 12.2 I noticed a few changes to the preinstall RPMs.

How to automatically build any recent version of the Oracle database.

There are many situations where you want to use a very specific configuration of the Oracle database, for example when a client has an issue and is still on EL5, or gets disk errors on a filesystem that is ext3, or is using ASM and gets weird IO patterns. Other examples are: you want to test the newest PSU to see if responds differently to an issue you are working on, or you want to test a combination of the Oracle database version 11.2.0.3 and grid infrastructure 12.1.0.2.

Of course you can just go and install a virtual machine, install all the different bits and pieces. Doing so manually kills vast amounts of time. By doing that, you will end up with a lot of virtual machines, for which at a certain point in time you have to make a decision to remove some of these.

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the physical read and use the block from the cache, until the block is evicted from the cache. The second choice is what is commonly referred to as ‘direct path read’, which places the blocks physically read into the process’ PGA, which means the read blocks are stored for only a short duration and is not shared with other processes.

12.2 New Feature: the FLEX ASM disk group part 4

Flex Disk Group Properties

In the previous 3 parts I shared my investigation into ASM Flex Disk Groups, Quota Groups, File Groups, and how Quota Groups actually enforce space limits. What I haven’t discussed yet was changing properties of a File Group and the effects thereof. Properties I have in mind are related to the protection level, as discussed in the official documentation-Automatic Storage Management Administrator’s Guide, Administering Oracle ASM Disk Groups. There are of course other properties as well (and you’ll find a link to all of the modifiable properties later in this post), but they are out of scope for this investigation.

Installation of Rundeck with the Ansible plugin on Centos 7

This post shows you how to install Rundeck with the Ansible plugin on Centos 7. The installation is done with nginx as the web server and using SSL with a self signed certificate. Please read the Ansible installation script, and modify anything that should be different for your situation. You will be amazed how well readable the installation script is!

Rundeck is a web based user interface that allows you to run commands against a group of hosts. Rundeck has an ansible plugin. Using that plugin, it could perform the similar functionality as Ansible Tower (commercial product) or Semaphore (open source).

After a fresh installation of Centos 7, do the following as root:

Installation overview of node_exporter, prometheus and grafana

Prometheus is an open source systems monitoring and alerting toolkit originally build at Soundcloud. This blogpost shows how to install the needed components to do visualisation of linux system statistics via Grafana.

The setup consists of 3 components:
node_exporter, an exporter of system and hardware metrics.
prometheus, a metric collection and persistence layer.
grafana, the visualisation layer.

1. Preparation
The needed components are installed in the home directory of the user ‘prometheus’. In order for that user exist, it must obviously first be created:

Linux memory usage

One of the principal important configuration settings for running an Oracle database is making appropriate use of memory. Sizing the memory regions too small leads to increased IO, sizing the memory regions too big leads to inefficient use of memory and an increase in memory latency most notably because of swapping.

On Linux, there is a fair amount of memory information available, however it is not obvious how to use that information, which frequently leads to inefficient use of memory, especially in today’s world of consolidation.

The information about linux server database usage is available in /proc/meminfo, and looks like this:

12.2 New Feature: the FLEX ASM disk group part 3

In the previous 2 parts of this mini series I introduced the Flex ASM disk group and two related concepts, the Quota Group and File Group. In what should have become the final part (but isn’t) I am interested in checking whether quotas are enforced.

(Un)fortunately I have uncovered a few more things that are worth investigating and blogging about, which is why a) this isn’t the last post and b) it got a bit shorter than the previous two. Had I combined part 3 and 4 it would have been too long for sure … BTW, you can navigate all posts using the links at the very bottom of the page.

Are quotas enforced?

The purpose of the Quota Group is … to enforce quotas on a disk group, much like on a file system. This is quite interesting, because you now have a hard limit to which databases can grow within a disk group even for non-CDBs.