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Linux Scripting, Part III

In the previous blog posts, we learned how to set up the first part of a standard shell script- how to interactively set variables, including how to pass them as part of the script execution. In this next step, we’ll use those to build out Azure resources. If you’re working on-premises, you can use this type of scripting with SQL Server 2019 Linux but will need to use CLI commands and SQLCMD. I will cover this in later posts, but honestly, the cloud makes deployment quicker for any business to get what they need deployed and with the amount of revenue riding on getting to market faster, this should be the first choice of any DBA with vision.

Linux Scripting, Part II

In Part I, we started with some scripting basics, as in, how to write a script. This included the concepts of breaking a script into sections, (introduction, body and conclusion)

For Part II, we’ll start with the BASH script “introduction”.

The introduction in a BASH script should begin the same in all scripts.

  1. Set the shell to be used for the script
  2. Set the response to failure on any steps, (exit or ignore)
  3. Add in a step for testing, but comment out or remove when in production

For our scripts, we’ll keep to the BASH format that is used by the template scripts, ensuring a repeatable and easy to identify introduction.

Dynamic Values in Linux Scripting

I do a LOT of scripting. Given the choice to click in a GUI vs. typing at the command line, I’ll choose the command line. Given the choice to type commands in repeatedly vs. scripting out a task I perform more than twice, I’ll script. Scripting effectively is an art as much as it’s a science.

My idea of science

Where a GUI can change, both in content, as well as layout, a script is less impacted by this when it is designed to dynamically work with the catalog. You have the choice to either work with the values in an array or to just pull it into a temporary file to work with as part of the script. For the example, I’ll stick with the latter to make our example easier to reproduce.

Shell Tricks

DBAs from time to time must write shell scripts. If your environment is strictly Windows based, this article may hold little interest for you.

Many DBAs however rely on shell scripting to manage databases. Even if you use OEM for many tasks, you likely use shell scripts to manage some aspects of DBA work.

Lately I have been writing a number of scripts to manage database statistics - gathering, deleting, and importing exporting both to and from statistics tables exp files.

Years ago I started using the shell builtin getopts to gather arguments from the command line. A typical use might look like the following:

while getopts d:u:s:T:t:n: arg
do
case $arg in