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Applying PSU 12.1.0.1.1 to Oracle Restart

I was actually hoping I had already written enough about applying the PSU for 12.1.0.1.0 but today I tried to apply the patch to my Oracle Restart home in my lab VM and guess what-it wasn’t as automatic as I thought.

I must have performed the classic copy & paste error and applied the patch to the GRID_HOME only. Please don’t do this! The README clearly states you can but if you do, you will run into this mess. At the time of writing there was no hit for the error on my favourite search engine, hence this post. If you see this on a real database and not on your personal lab VM you should of course consult support what to do. This is for educational purposes only, so to say.

Interesting post-install steps for Oct 2013 12.1.0.1.1 PSU

I have already written about RAC/Grid Infrastructure related patching of 12.1.0.1.0 to 12.1.0.1.1, aka the October 2013 PSU for the database.

This post is a follow-up for pure RDBMS-only installations. I initially thought it wasn’t worth blogging about it (and hence the lag between the posts) but I came across an interesting post-apply step that is required for the databases: datapatch.

This is a new tool to run post the Patch Set Update installation against the non-CDB.

UPDATE: Oracle discourages the application of the patch set for RAC/GI on Multi-Tenant.

Here is the reference output for a non-CDB:

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

Printing system call arguments in gdb

This blogpost is about how to print the system call arguments of a system call which is caught with ‘catch’ or ‘break’ in gdb. The reason for this blogpost is I spend quite some time on searching for this, and working around this, so writing it in a blogpost might help others who spend (some of) their time in the gdb debugger, and encounter the same issue.

When you break on a system call in gdb, it will show you something like this:

Getting up and running with UCP and Application Continuity

I have already posted a couple of articles on the use of Oracle’s Universal Connection Pool in the past with regards to Workload Management and Oracle RAC 11.2. Since then a lot happened, with the release of Oracle 12c being the most notable event. With 12c you get lots of interesting new features for JDBC, and the one I would like to present today is Application Continuity. This continues the previous post on playing with Application Continuity outside of a midlle-tier environment. Well, if you allow me to call Tomcat 7 “middle-tier” that is.

The aim of this post is to extend my previous posts about setting up UCP with Application Continuity. The basic setup remains unchanged, but this time I tested with JDK 1.6 (build 1.6.0_45-b06) and Tomcat 7.0.47 on Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.4 64bit.

When the Oracle wait interface isn’t enough, part 2: understanding measurements.

In my blogpost When the oracle wait interface isn’t enough I showed how a simple asynchronous direct path scan of a table was spending more than 99% of it’s time on CPU, and that perf showed me that 68% (of the total elapsed time) was spent on a spinlock unlock in the linux kernel which was called by io_submit().

This led to some very helpful comments from Tanel Poder. This blogpost is a materialisation of his comments, and tests to show the difference.

First take a look at what I gathered from ‘perf’ in the first article:

Building vmware-tools in your Oracle Linux UEK3 VM

This is a quick writeup of an oddity I found while trying to install the vmwareware tools in an Oracle Linux host with the UEK3 kernel enabled (which is by default).

This is what is encountered during the vmware tools installation dialog when running vmwaretools.pl:

Searching for a valid kernel header path...
The path "" is not a valid path to the 3.8.13-16.2.2.el6uek.x86_64 kernel 
headers.
Would you like to change it? [yes]

The building of vmware tools fail because the kernel headers can not be found: the installer doesn’t see the kernel headers, whilst you probably installed it (it’s the kernel-uek-devel package belonging to the running kernel).

Playing with Application Continuity in RAC 12c

One of the more interesting features in Oracle 12c RAC is application continuity. Why do I believe it is? Because it relieves developers from having to think about retrying connections and catch SQLExceptions in the code. I already thought that Fast Application Notification and Fast Connect Failover (FCF) are great, _but_ they required the developer to understand RAC and Oracle which you can’t take for granted. In fact looking back over the last few years since I co-wrote Pro Oracle Database 11g RAC on Linux the number 1 complaint I got from developers was that RAC was too complex (see for example in this thread on oracle-l)

Now Application Continuity takes away 2 problems I have seen.