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Make Your Business More Accessible with New Blocks

From our support sessions with customers each month, we know that growing your brand or business is a top website goal. And in this unprecedented time in which more people around the world are staying at home, it’s important to promote your products and services online to reach a wider audience and connect with more people.

Our team has been hard at work improving the block editor experience. We’ve launched six new blocks that integrate WordPress.com and Jetpack-enabled sites with popular services — Eventbrite, Calendly, Pinterest, Mapbox, Google Calendar, and OpenTable — enabling you to embed rich content and provide booking and scheduling options right on your blog or website.

Create With Confidence — and Better Blocks

In the last few years, the teams working on the block editor have learned a lot about how people build sites now and how they want to build sites in the future.

The latest version represents the culmination of these discoveries, and the next stage in the editor’s evolution.

With better visuals and more advanced features, it’ll keep designers, developers, writers, and editors productive and happy, and — tension-building drumroll — it’s in your editor right now!

What’s new

With a comprehensive visual refresh, a plethora of new features, and dozens of bug fixes, the new block editor comes with a lot to unpack.

The Block Editor is Now Supported on the WordPress Native Apps

Part of what helps WordPress power 35% of the web is language: WordPress is fully translated into 68 languages. Pair that with the WordPress native apps, which make WordPress available across devices, and you have a globally accessible tool.

Today we’re announcing app updates that bring the new Block editor to mobile devices, so on-the-go publishing is even easier for that 35%.

At Automattic, we speak 88 different languages, so we thought: why not use some of them to tell you about the editor updates? Instead of a few screenshots and bullet points, here are some of the people who build the editor and apps sharing their favorite tools and tricks for the mobile Block editor. To make it more accessible, we’ve also included English translations. 

(And for those who want more detail — yes, there are still screenshots and bullet points!)

PHP 7.4 Just Came Out, and So Did Our PHP Version Switcher

PHP is still one of the most popular languages used to build the web. The newest version, PHP 7.4, was released today — and Business and eCommerce plan customers can opt to start using it immediately.

WordPress.com sites run PHP 7.3 by default — it’s still our recommended version, since it’s been stress-tested across all of WordPress.com — but if you have a site on the Business or eCommerce plan and want to be on the leading technological edge, you can opt to switch to version 7.4 immediately.

Head to My Site > Manage > Hosting Configuration to find the new PHP Version Switcher:

A New Way to Earn Money on WordPress.com

It’s hard to be creative when you’re worried about money. Running ads on your site helps, but for many creators, ad revenue isn’t enough. Top publishers and creators sustain their businesses by building reliable income streams through ongoing contributions.

Our new Recurring Payments feature for WordPress.com and Jetpack-powered sites lets you do just that: it’s a monetization tool for content creators who want to collect repeat contributions from their supporters, and it’s available with any paid plan on WordPress.com.

Let your followers support you with periodic, scheduled payments. Charge for your weekly newsletter, accept monthly donations, sell yearly access to exclusive content — and do it all with an automated payment system.

Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

12c Parallel Execution New Features: Parallel FILTER Subquery Evaluation - Part 3: The Optimizer And Distribution Methods

As mentioned in the first and second part of this instalment the different available distribution methods of the new parallel FILTER are selected automatically by the optimizer - in this last post of this series I want to focus on that optimizer behaviour.It looks like there are two new optimizer related parameters that control the behaviour of the new feature: "_px_filter_parallelized" is the overall switch to enable/disable the new parallel filter capability - and defaults to "true" in 12c, and "_px_filter_skew_handling" influences how the optimizer determines the distribution methods - the parameter naming suggests that it somehow has to do with some kind of "skew" - note that the internal parameter that handles the new

12c Parallel Execution New Features: Parallel FILTER Subquery Evaluation - Part 2: Distribution Methods

Picking up from the first part of this instalment I'll focus in this post on the available distribution methods for the new parallel FILTER subquery feature.In this post I won't go into the details how the optimizer selects the distribution method automatically - this will be covered in the last part.Here I merely describe the different available methods and how to control them using the new PQ_FILTER hint, which is also mentioned in the official documentation, although I find a bit hard to follow the description there.There are four different options available to the PQ_FILTER hint, and only two of them actually describe a distribution method.