Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

Oracle

Misleading Execution Plan

A couple of weeks ago I published a note about an execution plan which showed the details of a scalar subquery in the wrong place (as far as the typical strategies for interpreting execution plans are concerned). In a footnote to the article I commented that Andy Sayer had produced a simple reproducible example of the anomaly based around the key features of the query supplied in the original posting and had emailed it to me.  With his permission (and with some minor modifications) I’ve reproduced it below:

Generate your Oracle Secure External Password Store wallet from your tnsnames.ora

Want to connect passwordless with SQLcl to your databases from a single location? Here is a script that creates the Secure External Password Store wallet credentials for each service declared in the tnsnames, as well as shell aliases for it (as bash does autocompletion). The idea is to put everything (wallet, sqlcl,…) in one single directory that you must protect of course because read access to the files is sufficient to connect to your databases.

Download the latest SQLcl from:

SQLcl Downloads

And install the Oracle Client if you do not have it already:

Oracle Instant Client Downloads

Now here is my script that:

Using the Secure External Password store with sqlcl

Sometimes it is necessary to invoke a SQL script in bash or otherwise in an unattended way. SQLcl has become my tool of choice because it’s really lightweight and can do a lot. If you haven’t worked with it yet, you really should give it a go.

I ‘fixed’ execution plan regression with optimizer_features_enable, what to do next?

Here is a simple example of using Mauro Pagano ‘pathfinder’ tool where you don’t really want to run the query, but just get the execution plan with all variations of optimizer settings. That’s something I used many times in situations similar to this one:

Easy Oracle Cloud wallet location in the JDBC connection string

I wrote about the 19c easy-connect string recently and the possibility to use a wallet with it (and no need for a tnsnames.ora then):

19c EZCONNECT and Wallet (Easy Connect and External Password File)

That was with sqlplus and setting TNS_ADMIN and still requires sqlnet.ora to set the wallet location directory. This post adds two things:

  • TNS_NAMES parameter in the JDBC URL with no need for
    the java -Doracle.net.tns_admin
  • We can add our password to the cloud wallet downloaded from the Autonomous Database (ATP/ADW)

Oracle Cloud user

For this test I’ve created a new user in my Autonomous Transaction Processing cloud service.

The click-path is:

Learning about Kubernetes: JDBC database connectivity to an Oracle database

In the past few months I have spent some time trying to better understand Kubernetes and how application developers can make use of it in the context of the Oracle database. In this post I’m sharing what I learned along that way. Please be careful: this is very much a moving target, and I wouldn’t call myself an expert in the field. If you find anything in this post that could be done differently/better, please let me know!

By the way, I am going to put something similar together where Oracle Restful Data Services (ORDS) will provide a different, more popular yet potentially more difficult-to-get-right connection method.

Execution Plan Puzzle

Here’s an execution plan that’s just been published on the ODC database forum. The plan comes from a call to dbms_xplan.display_cursor() with rowsource execution statistics enabled.

There’s something unusual about the execution statistics that I don’t think I’ve seen before – can anyone else see anything really odd, or (better still) anything which they would expect others to find odd but which they can easily explain.

A couple of hints:

Occurence

Before you comment – I do know that the title has a spelling mistake in it. That’s because the Oracle code uses exactly this spelling in one of the little-used features of tracing.

LOB length

This note is a reminder combined with a warning about unexpected changes as you move from version to version. Since it involves LOBs (large objects) it may not be relevant for most people but since there’s a significant change in the default character set for the database as you move up to 18.3 (or maybe even as you move to 12.2) anyone using character LOBs may get a surprise.

Here’s a simple script that I’m first going to run on an instance of 11.2.0.4:

Avoid compound hints for better Hint Reporting in 19c

Even if the syntax accepts it, it is not a good idea to write a hint like:

https://docs.oracle.com/en/database/oracle/oracle-database/19/sqlrf/Comments.html#GUID-56DAA0EC-54BB-4E9D-9049-BCEA934F7A89

/*+ USE_NL(A B) */ with multiple aliases (‘tablespec’) even if it is documented.

One reason is that it is misleading. How many people think that this tells the optimizer to use a Nested Loop between A and B? That’s wrong. This hint just declares that Nested Loop should be used if possible when joining from any table to A, and for joining from any table to B.

Actually, this is a syntax shortcut for: /*+ USE_NL(A) USE_NL(B) */