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Oracle 12c

About index range scans, disk re-reads and how your new car can go 600 miles per hour!

Despite the title, this is actually a technical post about Oracle, disk I/O and Exadata & Oracle In-Memory Database Option performance. Read on :)

If a car dealer tells you that this fancy new car on display goes 10 times (or 100 or 1000) faster than any of your previous ones, then either the salesman is lying or this new car is doing something radically different from all the old ones. You don’t just get orders of magnitude performance improvements by making small changes.

Perhaps the car bends space around it instead of moving – or perhaps it has a jet engine built on it (like the one below :-) :

Oracle Database 12.1.0.2.0 – Turning on the In-Memory Database option

It is indeed that sample as switching a knob to turn it on. To enable it you will have to set a reasonable among of...
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Introducing the Analytic Keep Clause for Effective-Dated/Sequence Queries in PeopleSoft

Those of us who work with PeopleSoft, and especially the HCM product, are all too familiar with the concept of effect-dated data, and the need to find data that was effective at a particular date.  PeopleSoft products have always made extensive use of correlated sub-queries to determine the required rows from an effective-dated record.

The JOB record is a the heart of HCM. It is both effective-dated and effective sequenced. I will use it for the demonstrations in this article. I am going to suggest an alternative, although Oracle-specific, SQL construction.

 Let's start by looking at the job data for an employee in the demo database. Employee KF0018 has 17 rows of data two concurrent jobs.  The question I am going to ask is "What was the annual salary for this employee on 11 February 1995?".  Therefore, I am interested in the rows marked below with the asterisks. 

Introducing the Analytic Keep Clause for Effective-Dated/Sequence Queries in PeopleSoft

Those of us who work with PeopleSoft, and especially the HCM product, are all too familiar with the concept of effect-dated data, and the need to find data that was effective at a particular date.  PeopleSoft products have always made extensive use of correlated sub-queries to determine the required rows from an effective-dated record.

The JOB record is a the heart of HCM. It is both effective-dated and effective sequenced. I will use it for the demonstrations in this article. I am going to suggest an alternative, although Oracle-specific, SQL construction.

 Let's start by looking at the job data for an employee in the demo database. Employee KF0018 has 17 rows of data two concurrent jobs.  The question I am going to ask is "What was the annual salary for this employee on 11 February 1995?".  Therefore, I am interested in the rows marked below with the asterisks. 

Our take on the Oracle Database 12c In-Memory Option

Enkitec folks have been beta testing the Oracle Database 12c In-Memory Option over the past months and recently the Oracle guys interviewed Kerry OsborneCary Millsap and me to get our opinions. In short, this thing rocks!

We can’t talk much about the technical details before Oracle 12.1.0.2 is officially out in July, but here’s the recorded interview that got published at Oracle website as part of the In-Memory launch today:

Alternatively go to Oracle webpage:

Boston Oracle User Group Session: Oracle 12c Features You Should Know

Thank you for all those who attended the session, and braved it up to 10 PM. Much much appreciated.

Download the slides here, and scripts I used for the demos here.

As always, your feedback will be highly appreciated.

Hotsos Symposium 2014

After missing last year’s Hotsos Symposium (trying to cut my travel as you know :), I will present at and deliver the full-day Training Day at this year’s Hotsos Symposium! It will be my 10th time to attend (and speak at) this awesome conference. So I guess this means more beer than usual. Or maybe less, as I’m getting old. Let’s make it as usual, then :0)

DataGuard – Far Sync – part 2 - Data Guard Broker

Oracle introduced Far Sync Data Guard configuration which I described briefly in this post. Now is time for part two and using Data Guard Broker to add Far Sync instance.
Assuming that you have basic Data Guard Broker configuration ready (as described in - How to quickly build standby database and setup DataGuard configuration using Oracle 12c) adding new Far Sync instance is quite easy task.

DataGuard – Far Sync – part 2 - Data Guard Broker

Oracle introduced Far Sync Data Guard configuration which I described briefly in this post. Now is time for part two and using Data Guard Broker to add Far Sync instance.
Assuming that you have basic Data Guard Broker configuration ready (as described in - How to quickly build standby database and setup DataGuard configuration using Oracle 12c) adding new Far Sync instance is quite easy task.

Last Successful Login Time in SQL*Plus in Oracle 12c

If you have been working with Oracle 12c, you may have missed a little something that appeared without mush fanfare but has some powerful implications. Let's see it with a small example--connecting with SQL*Plus.

C:\> sqlplus arup/arup

SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.1.0 Production on Mon Aug 19 14:17:45 2013

Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Last Successful login time: Mon Aug 19 2013 14:13:33 -04:00