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Oracle 18c

ADWC – connect from your premises

In the previous post about the Autonomous Data Warehouse Service, I’ve run queries though the Machine Learning Notebooks. But you obviously want to connect to it from your premises, with SQL*Net.

CaptureADWCconnect001Of course the connection, going through the public internet, must be secured. If you already use a managed service like the Oracle Exadata Express Cloud Service, you already know how to do: download a .zip containing the connection string and the wallet and certificate for SQL*Net encryption.

ADWC – the hidden gem: Zepplin Notebook

IMG_5339
In the previous blog posts I explained how to create, and stop/start the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service. And I didn’t show yet how to connect to it. It is easy, from sqlplus or SQL Developer, or SQLcl.

But there’s something more exciting to run some SQL queries: the Oracle Machine Learning Notebooks based on Apache Zepplin. At first, I didn’t realize why the administration menu entry to create users in the ADWC service was named ‘Manage Oracle ML Users’, and didn’t realize that the ‘Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud’ header was replaced by ‘Machine Learning’.

ADWC – a Docker container to start/stop Oracle Cloud services

In the previous post, I’ve explained how to start and stop the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service from PSM (PaaS Service Manager). There’s a setup phase, and a run phase starting with service-start and ending with service-stop. And the setup is specific to an Oracle Cloud account, storing information in the local user home. You may want to run different setups, and even provide an easy way to start/stop an Oracle Cloud service without knowing the user, password and tenant name.

A Docker container is perfect to isolate this.

ADWC: start/stop with PSM Command Line Interface

In the previous post, I explained how to create an Autonomous Data Warehouse with PSM (PaaS Service Manager Command Line Interface). The most common operation you want to do with it is starting and stopping the service. This is the best way to save credits for hourly billed services. And PSM is the easiest: run from everywhere (it is Python 3) and no need to provide credentials each time. In the previous post, I explained how to setup PSM for the ADWC service.

Unfortunately, for starting and stopping the instance you may realize that:

ADWC: Creation of Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service

You want to try the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service? That’s easy. Here is a Step-by-Step.

18c PDB switchover

In multitenant, the recovery and availability are at CDB level. But customers asked for a switchover at PDB level so Oracle has done that in 18c, based on refreshable PDBs.

For this test I have two multitenant database on an Oracle Cloud service in 18c: CDB1 and CDB2. The only special thing I did was disable the mandatory TDE encryption, because I was not able to have the switchover working. With TDE encryption, I got the “ORA-46697: Keystore password required”. But there is no ‘keystore identified by’ option in the ‘alter pluggable database’. Then If you came upon this post from a search on this error, I’ve no solution yet (SR 3-17001228251 opened on the Oracle Cloud Support – see update at the end of the post when solved).

Enabled, Accepted, Fixed SQL Plan Baselines

When the documentation is not always clear, I prefer to build a test case to be sure about the behavior in different context and different versions. Here is a test on SQL Plan Management to show which plan is chosen among the different states of SQL Plan Baselines: Enabled, Accepted, Fixed. Thanks to Oracle ACE program, I have some Oracle Cloud credits to quickly provision a database, so I tested that on Oracle 18c.

For this test, I’ve created a table:

create table DEMO as select rownum n from xmltable('1 to 10000');

with 8 indexes:

exec for i in 1..8 loop execute immediate 'create index DEMO'||i||' on DEMO(n,'||i||')'; end loop;

and a procedure to query it several times, setting random costs for the indexes, with only one cheapest:

create or replace procedure runplans(n number) as
dummy number;
begin

18c new Lost Write Protection

There are many layers between the Oracle Database pwrite() calls and the physical sector written on disk: filesystem, logical volume, SAN or NAS, with a lot of smart software running for Virtualisation, Compression, Snapshotting, Synchronisation… Are you sure that the changes you made to your data is actually persisted on disk, completely and without any corruption? In case of bug or crash in the storage layer, it may happen that only part of the changes was written. In the case of crash, Oracle ensures that the datafile headers are written at the end, so that recovery can kick-in after the crash. Then, a partially written block can be detected and restored. With different checksum settings, you can also check block integrity while writing or reading. But that protects only for fractured blocks. What if a block write just did not occur? An old version of the block remains and then is perfectly correct for checksum, RMAN, and DBV.

18c dbms_xplan note about failed SQL Plan Baseline

SQL Plan Baselines is a great feature for plan stability: you capture the plans that you accept. However, if the data model changes and the accepted plans cannot reproduce, the optimizer will come with a new plan. In 18c we have a note from DBMS_XPLAN when the optimization ‘failed to use SQL plan baseline for this statement’.

I create a table, with an index, and run a query on it using this index:

SQL> create table DEMO as select rownum n from xmltable('1 to 1000');
Table DEMO created.
 
SQL> create index DEMO_N on DEMO(n);
Index DEMO_N created.
 
SQL> select * from DEMO where n=1;
 
N
-
1

18c, Cloud First and Cloud Only features: think differently

Remember the times when the Oracle Software features were the same on all platforms? Where Oracle databases could be ported to any relevant platform? Where we were able to try any feature, freely, by downloading the latest release software? Now we need to think differently. Because: