Oracle EE

The hang manager

Recently I was looking in the trace directory in the diag dest of my (12.2.0.1) instance, and found some trace files which were different from the others:

$ ls | grep dia0
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trm
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trm
test_dia0_9711.trc
test_dia0_9711.trm

The dia0 ‘test_dia0_9711.trc’ file is fully expected. But what are these ‘..lws_1.trc’ and ‘..base_1.trc’ files? And ‘base’ is something that I understand, but what would ‘lws’ mean? Lunatics Without Skateboards?

First, let’s look into the normally named trace file of the dia0 process:

Oracle 12.1 big table caching IO code path

Recently I was triggered about the ‘automatic big table caching’ feature introduced in Oracle version 12.1.0.2 with Roger Macnicol’s blogpost about Oracle database IO and caching or not caching (https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-1 https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-2). If you want to read something about the feature in general, search for the feature name, you’ll find several blogposts about it.

Oracle C functions annotations

Warning! This is a post about Oracle database internals for internals lovers and researchers. For normal, functional administration, this post serves no function. The post shows a little tool I created which consists of a small database I compiled with Oracle database C function names and a script to query it. The reason that keeping such a database makes sense in the first place, is because the Oracle C functions for the Oracle database are setup in an hierarchy based on the function name. This means you can deduct what part of the execution you are in by looking at the function name; for example ‘kslgetl’ means kernel service lock layer, get latch.

To use this, clone git repository at https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/ora_functions.git

How to automatically build any recent version of the Oracle database.

There are many situations where you want to use a very specific configuration of the Oracle database, for example when a client has an issue and is still on EL5, or gets disk errors on a filesystem that is ext3, or is using ASM and gets weird IO patterns. Other examples are: you want to test the newest PSU to see if responds differently to an issue you are working on, or you want to test a combination of the Oracle database version 11.2.0.3 and grid infrastructure 12.1.0.2.

Of course you can just go and install a virtual machine, install all the different bits and pieces. Doing so manually kills vast amounts of time. By doing that, you will end up with a lot of virtual machines, for which at a certain point in time you have to make a decision to remove some of these.

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the physical read and use the block from the cache, until the block is evicted from the cache. The second choice is what is commonly referred to as ‘direct path read’, which places the blocks physically read into the process’ PGA, which means the read blocks are stored for only a short duration and is not shared with other processes.

Linux memory usage

One of the principal important configuration settings for running an Oracle database is making appropriate use of memory. Sizing the memory regions too small leads to increased IO, sizing the memory regions too big leads to inefficient use of memory and an increase in memory latency most notably because of swapping.

On Linux, there is a fair amount of memory information available, however it is not obvious how to use that information, which frequently leads to inefficient use of memory, especially in today’s world of consolidation.

The information about linux server database usage is available in /proc/meminfo, and looks like this:

A performance deep dive into column encryption

Actually, this is a follow up post from my performance deep dive into tablespace encryption. After having investigated how tablespace encryption works, this blogpost is looking at the other encryption option, column encryption. A conclusion that can be shared upfront is that despite they basically perform the same function, the implementation and performance consequences are quite different.

A performance deep dive into tablespace encryption

This is a run through of a performance investigation into Oracle tablespace encryption. These are the versions this test was performed on:

$ cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.8
$ /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1/OPatch/opatch lspatches
24315824;Database PSU 12.1.0.2.161018, Oracle JavaVM Component (OCT2016)
24006101;Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.161018 (24006101)

In this test I created an encrypted tablespace:

SQL> create tablespace is_encrypted datafile size 10m autoextend on next 10m encryption default storage(encrypt);

(this assumes you have setup a master encryption key already)
And I created an encrypted simple heap table with one row:

Starting an instance with sqlplus and running into ORA-27302: failure occurred at: skgpwinit6

Recently I was applying the data dictionary part from an (exadata bundle) patch and ran into the following errors:

Oracle database 12.1.0.2.170117 (januari 2017 PSU) and TDE wallets

Recently, I was trying to setup TDE. Doing that I found out the Oracle provided documentation isn’t overly clear, and there is a way to do it in pre-Oracle 12, which is done using ‘alter system’ commands, and a new-ish way to do it in Oracle 12, using ‘administer key management’ commands. I am using version 12.1.0.2.170117, so decided to use the ‘administer key management’ commands. This blogpost is about an exception which I see is encountered in the Januari 2017 (170117) PSU of the Oracle database, which is NOT happening in Oracle 12.2 (no PSU’s for Oracle 12.2 at the time of writing) and Oracle 12.1.0.2 April 2016 and October 2016 PSU’s.

In order to test the wallet functionality for TDE, I used the following commands: