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What’s new with Oracle database 19.4 versus 19.3

The most notable thing here is an “official” (non-underscore) parameter has been introduced with 19.4, “ignore_session_set_param_errors”. The description is: ‘Ignore errors during alter session param set’. I did a quick check to see if I could set it to true or false, which I couldn’t (resulted in an error).

With the Oracle database version 19.3 patched to 19.4 on linux, the following things have changed:

What’s new with Oracle database 18.7 versus 18.6

With the Oracle database version 18.6 patched to 18.7 on linux, the following things have changed:

What’s new with Oracle database 12.2.0.1.190416 versus 12.2.0.1.190716

There are a couple of underscore parameters changed from spare to named ones.
It’s interesting to see that in sysstat, ‘spare statistic 2’ changed to ‘cell XT granule IO bytes saved by HDFS tbs extent map scan’. This obviously has to do with big data access via cell servers. What is weird is that this is the only version where this had happened.

What’s new with Oracle database 12.1.0.2.190416 versus 12.1.0.2.190716

There are a couple of undocumented spare parameters changed to named undocumented parameters, this is quite normal to see.

With the Oracle database version 12.1.0.2.190416 patched to 12.1.0.2.190716 on linux, the following things have changed:

Getting locale warnings when logging on to Linux

This blogpost is about the reason and solving getting the following message, or messages alike these when logging i to a linux box using ssh:

-bash: warning: setlocale: LC_CTYPE: cannot change locale (UTF-8): No such file or directory

However, this is a warning. Please mind such an issue might be come up in another way, which can be more disrupting; at least in the past I had issues running perl for the same issue:

[root@dmcel01 ~]# /usr/local/bin/ipconf -verify
perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
LANGUAGE = "en_US.UTF-8",
LC_ALL = "UTF-8",
LC_CTYPE = "UTF-8",
LANG = "en_US.UTF-8"
are supported and installed on your system.
perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").

OBUG Tech Days Belgium 2019 – Antwerp – 7/8-FEB-2019

Agenda: https://www.techdaysbelgium.be/?page_id=507

Dates: February 7 and 8, 2019

Location: http://cinemacartoons.be in Antwerp, Belgium

More information soon.

For people from the netherlands: this is easy reachable by car or by train! This is a chance to attend a conference and meet up with a lot of well-known speakers in the Oracle database area without too extensive travelling.

opatch investigations

This blogpost is about opatch and how to obtain information about the current oracle home(s), and how to obtain information about the patches to be applied.

Patches that can be applied using opatch are provided by oracle as zip files which have the following naming convention:
p[patchnumber]_[baseversion]_[platform]-[architecture].zip. The patch normally contains an XML file called ‘PatchSearch.xml’ and a directory with the patch number. Inside the patch number directory there is a README.txt which is lame, because it says ‘Refer to README.html’, and a README.html that contains the readme information that is also visible when the [README] button for this patch is selected in MOS.

opatch versions

This blogpost is about oracle’s patching tool for the database and grid infrastructure: opatch. I personally have a love/hate relationship with opatch. In essence, opatch automates a lot of things that would be very error prone if it were to be done by hand, which is a good thing. However, there are a lot of things surrounding opatch that I despise. An example of that is the version numbering of opatch itself.

Versions and more versions

To jump into the matter directly: versions. I don’t understand why this has to be this complicated. I would even go as far as saying that somebody needs to step in and clean this up.

Oracle wait event ‘TCP Socket (KGAS)’

I was asked some time ago what the Oracle database event ‘TCP socket (KGAS)’ means. This blogpost is a deep dive into what this event times in Oracle database 12.1.0.2.180717.

This event is not normally seen, only when TCP connections are initiated from the database using packages like UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP and the one used in this article, UTL_HTTP.

A very basic explanation is this event times the time that a database foreground session spends on TCP connection management and communicating over TCP, excluding client and database link (sqlnet) networking. If you trace the system calls, you see that mostly that is working with a (network) socket. Part of the code in the oracle database that is managing that, sits in the kernel code layer kgas, kernel generic (of which I am quite sure, and then my guess:) asynchronous services, which explains the naming of the event.