Oracle Indexes

ACT Oracle User Group Seminar Session: 2 June 2010

Just a short note for anyone near the Canberra region that the next ACT Oracle User Group Seminar Session will be held next Wednesday, 2 June 2010 at the Oracle Offices in Turner. I’ll be presenting “Indexing New Features and Improvements Introduced in Oracle 11g Release 1 & 2″. Follow the above link for the full agenda. [...]

Bitmap Index Degradation After DML Prior To 10g (Beauty and the Beast)

Bitmap Indexes have a bad reputation with regard to being problematic and suffering from severe degradation following heavy DML operations, especially larger amounts of insert activity. Bitmap indexes have been known to grow substantially and require periodic rebuilds following such insert activity. While this was certainly the case in previous versions of Oracle, things have dramatically improved since version 10g. [...]

Concatenated Bitmap Indexes Part II (Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime)

A basic little post to conclude this discussion. The issues regarding whether to go for single column indexes vs. concatenated indexes are similar for Bitmap indexes as they are for B-Tree indexes.   It’s generally more efficient to access a concatenated index as it’s only the one index with less processing and less throwaway rowids/rows [...]

Concatenated Bitmap Indexes Part I (Two Of Us)

Although Bitmap Indexes are commonly created on one column, you can create multi-column, concatenated Bitmap indexes as well.   Many of the same issues and factors in deciding to create a single, multi-column index vs. several, single column indexes apply to Bitmap indexes as they do with B-Tree indexes, although there are a number of [...]

So What Is A Good Cardinality Estimate For A Bitmap Index Column ? (Song 2)

As I’ve discussed previously, using a Bitmap index on a unique column makes little sense as the underling index must be larger than a corresponding B-tree index due to the implicit additional overheads associated with Bitmap indexes. As such, Oracle doesn’t permit the use of a Bitmap Index on a declared unique column or to [...]

Unique Bitmap Indexes Part II (You Can’t Do That)

As discussed in the previous post, a Bitmap index on a unique column will be larger than a corresponding Btree index due to the additional overheads associated with each index entry (such as the additional rowid, the additional column length bytes and the bitmap column itself). Oracle therefore attempts to protect you from explicitly creating such [...]

Unique Bitmap Indexes Part I (Unnatural Selection)

As I’ve discussed previously, a Bitmap index can be considered over a B-tree index (where concurrent DML is not an issue) even if there are potentially tens of millions of distinct values, in a table that has say hundreds of millions of rows.   However, if a column is unique or “approaches” uniqueness, then one [...]

Myth: Bitmap Indexes With High Distinct Columns (Supermassive Black Hole)

As discussed in my previous post, it’s a silly myth to suggest a bitmap index should only be used for so-called “low cardinality” columns else the resultant index would be “huge”. I thought it might be worth a quick refresh to see a simple little demonstration why such claims are a nonsense.  There is in fact no limit to [...]

Myth: Bitmap Indexes With High Distinct Columns (Blow Out)

I just couldn’t resist.   One of the great myths in Oracle is that bitmap indexes are only suitable and should only be used with columns that have so-called low cardinality (few distinct) values. A classic example of this myth being propagated is in this latest Burleson news item, “Oracle bitmap index maximum distinct values“, from Feb 16 [...]

How Does An Execution Plan Suddenly Change When The Statistics (And Everything Else) Remains The Same ? (In Limbo)

I’ve slipped this post in as there have been a number of discussions recently on how execution plans have changed while nothing else appears to have changed in the database. How can an execution plan suddenly change when no one has made any changes to the database ?   By no changes, it means that there [...]