Oracle Indexes

Storage Indexes vs Database Indexes Part II: Clustering Factor (Fast Track)

Two posts in two days !! Well, with Christmas just around the corner, I thought I better finish off a couple of blog posts before I get fully immersed in the festive season The Clustering Factor (CF) is the most important index related statistic, with the efficiency of an index performing multi-row range scans very much […]

Storage Indexes vs Database Indexes Part I MIN/MAX (Maxwell’s Silver Hammer)

It’s often stated that in Exadata, you don’t need conventional database indexes anymore as everything runs so damn fast that indexes are simply a waste of time and space. Simply drop all database indexes and things will run just as fast. Well, not quite … There are many many scenarios where database indexes are still […]

Exadata Storage Indexes Part V: Warming Up (Here Come The Warm Jets)

As I mentioned in a previous post, there are a number of Similarities between Storage Indexes and Database Indexes. One of these similarities is the “warming up” process that needs to take place before indexes become “optimal” after either the Storage Server (in the case of Storage Indexes) or the Database Server (in the case […]

Exadata Storage Indexes Part IV – Fast Full Table Scans (Speed of Life)

OK, let’s look at Storage Indexes in action. But first, following is the setup for the various demos to come. I basically create one table called BIG_BOWIE that’s about 1GB in size and then simply create another table called DWH_BOWIE where the contents of this are re-insert into itself a few times to get to about […]

Exadata Storage Indexes Part III – Similarities With Database Indexes (Same Old Scene)

As discussed previously, there are quite a number of differences between Storage Indexes (SIs) and Database Indexes (DIs). However, there are also a number similarities between both of them as well. The obvious one is that they’re both designed specifically to reduce the overheads associated with retrieving the required data out of the database. Both index structures provides […]

Exadata Storage Indexes Part II – Differences With Database Indexes (Space Dementia)

Let’s explore some of the key differences between Storage Indexes (SI) and Database Indexes (DI). In no particular order, they include: SIs are structures that exist only within the storage servers of an Exadata box, while DIs logically exist and can be accessed within the database servers. SIs are purely memory only structures while DIs are […]

Exadata Storage Indexes – Part I (Beginning To See The Light)

Thought I might discuss Exadata Storage Indexes, explore what they are, how they work and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Following is but a brief introduction on this very cool Exadata feature. A Storage Index basically maintains summary information about database table data down on the Exadata storage servers. The information consists of the minimum value, the maximum […]

Indexes: Oracle11g New Features Presentation (Get Back)

I’m in the early stages of compiling an Oracle12c Indexes New Features presentation so I thought I might make available the 11g version I’ve presented previously at Oracle OpenWorld and InSync conferences: http://richardfoote.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/oracle-indexing-new-feat... Enjoy

E4 2012 Enkitec Extreme Exadata Expo (Blue Jean)

I’m very pleased to have been invited to speak at the E4 2012 Enkitec Exadata Expo to be held in Dallas, USA on 13-14 August. It’s basically the first ever conference that’s dedicated exclusively to Oracle’s exciting Exadata platform. It should be a fabulous event, featuring some of the best Oracle talent going around, including Jonathan Lewis, Tanel [...]

Indexes vs. Full Table Scan: Picture vs. 1000 Words (Pictures Of Lily)

I’m in the process of writing a number of new presentations and in one I’ve included a favorite little graph of mine that I’ve used over the years to help illustrate the relationship between the cost of using an index vs. the cost of using a Full Table Scan (FTS). It’s occurred to me that I’ve never actually [...]