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Oracle database reliable message waits

This blog is about the oracle database wait event ‘reliable message’. It should be noted that normally, this should not be a prominent wait, and if it does so, the most logical cause would be something that is not working as it should, either by oversubscribing something or simply because of a bug.

The reliable message note on My Oracle Support provides a good description:
https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocContentDisplay?_afrLoop=34595019638128&id=69088.1&_afrWindowMode=0&_adf.ctrl-state=15ief27plw_97

Oracle database processes and waiting long in the supermarket

Hopefully I got your interest by the weird name of this blogpost. This blogpost is about sensible usage of an Oracle database. Probably, there are a lot of blog posts like this, but I need to get this off my chest.

A quote any starwars fan would recognise is ‘I sense a disturbance in the force’. I do, and I have felt it for a long time. This disturbance is the usage of the number of connections for a database. Because of my profession, this is the oracle database, but this really applies to the server-side of any client/server server processor running on at least (but probably not limited to) intel Xeon processors.

The disturbance is the oversubscription or sometimes even excessive oversubscription of database connections from application servers, or any other means of database processes that acts as clients. This means this does not exclude parallel query processes, in other words: this applies to parallel query processes too.

What’s new with Oracle database 11.2.0.4.200714 versus 11.2.0.4.201020

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 200714 (july 2020) and PSU 201020 (october 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 12.1.0.2.200714 versus 12.1.0.2.201020

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 12.1.0.2 PSU 200714 (july 2020) and PSU 201020 (october 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

About the oracle database and compiling and linking.

This blogpost is about how the oracle database executable created or changed during installation and patching. I take linux for the examples, because that is the version that I am almost uniquely working with. I think the linux operating is where the vast majority of linux installations are installed on, and therefore an explanation with linux is helpful to most of the people.

The first thing to understand is the oracle executable is a dynamically linked executable. This is easy to see when you execute the ‘ldd’ utility against the oracle executable:

What’s new with Oracle database 12.2.0.1.200714 versus 12.2.0.1.201020

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 12.2.0.1 PSU 200714 (july 2020) and PSU 201020 (october 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the PSU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 18.11 versus 18.12

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 18 RU 11 (july 2020) and RU 12 (october 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the RU impacts anything.

Functions

What’s new with Oracle database 19.9 versus 19.8

This blogpost takes a look at the technical differences between Oracle database 19 RU 8 (july 2020) and RU 9 (october 2020). This gives technical specialists an idea of the differences, and gives them the ability to assess if the RU impacts anything.

Functions

Using Grafana Loki to be able to search and view all logs

This post is about how to make your log files being aggregated in a single place and easy searchable via a convenient web interface.

How to use DBMS_PIPE to halt and continue a PLSQL database session

I posted a message on twitter saying that DBMS_PIPE is an excellent mechanism to make a session run and halt in PLSQL. One response I gotten was asking for an example of that. That is what this post is about.

DBMS_PIPE is an implementation of a pipe inside the Oracle database. A pipe is a mechanism that is not limited to the Oracle database, in fact I assume the implementation is inspired by an operating system level pipe, which can be created using the ‘mknod /path/pipename p’ on unix and unix-like systems. A quick search shows windows has got them too, but not really, or does it? Another implementation is the pipe to redirect output from one command to the next using ‘|’. The essence of a pipe that input to and output from the pipe are separated from each other, and that information is flowing from the inputting process of the pipe to the outputting process.