Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

Oracle XE

A look into into Oracle redo, part 4: the log writer null write

This is the fourth blogpost on a series of blogposts about how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous blogpost talked about the work cycle of the log writer: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-3-the-log-writer-work-cycle-overview/. This posts is looking into the execution of the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function executed in the ksbcti.

A look into Oracle redo, part 3: log writer work cycle overview

This is the third part of a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous part talked about the memory area that stores redo strand information: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/.

The single most important process in the Oracle database for handling redo is the log writer, which primary task is flushing the redo information other Oracle database processes put in the public redo strands to disk. Now that we have investigated the public redo strands and concurrency (first part) and kcrfsg_ and the KCRFA structure (second part), it seems logical to me to look at the log writer.

A look into Oracle redo, part 2: the discovery of the KCRFA structure

This is the second post in a series of blogposts on Oracle database redo internals. If you landed on this blogpost without having read the first blogpost, here is a link to the first blogpost: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/ The first blogpost contains all the versions used and a synopsis on what the purpose of this series of blogposts is.

In the first part, I showed how the principal access to the public redo strands is controlled by redo allocation latches, and showed a snippet of trace information of memory accesses of a foreground session when using the first public redo strand:

A look into Oracle redo, part 1: redo allocation latches

This will be a series of posts about Oracle database redo handling. The database in use is Oracle version 12.2.0.1, with PSU 170814 applied. The operating system version is Oracle Linux Server release 7.4. In order to look into the internals of the Oracle database, I use multiple tools; very simple ones like the X$ views and oradebug, but also advanced ones, quite specifically the intel PIN tools (https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/pin-a-dynamic-binary-instrumentation-tool). One of these tools is ‘debugtrace’, which contains pretty usable output on itself (a indented list of function calls and returns), for which I essentially filter out some data, another one is ‘pinatrace’, which does not produce directly usable output, because it provides instruction pointer and memory addresses.

The hang manager

Recently I was looking in the trace directory in the diag dest of my (12.2.0.1) instance, and found some trace files which were different from the others:

$ ls | grep dia0
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trm
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trm
test_dia0_9711.trc
test_dia0_9711.trm

The dia0 ‘test_dia0_9711.trc’ file is fully expected. But what are these ‘..lws_1.trc’ and ‘..base_1.trc’ files? And ‘base’ is something that I understand, but what would ‘lws’ mean? Lunatics Without Skateboards?

First, let’s look into the normally named trace file of the dia0 process:

Oracle 12.1 big table caching IO code path

Recently I was triggered about the ‘automatic big table caching’ feature introduced in Oracle version 12.1.0.2 with Roger Macnicol’s blogpost about Oracle database IO and caching or not caching (https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-1 https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-2). If you want to read something about the feature in general, search for the feature name, you’ll find several blogposts about it.

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the physical read and use the block from the cache, until the block is evicted from the cache. The second choice is what is commonly referred to as ‘direct path read’, which places the blocks physically read into the process’ PGA, which means the read blocks are stored for only a short duration and is not shared with other processes.

Linux memory usage

One of the principal important configuration settings for running an Oracle database is making appropriate use of memory. Sizing the memory regions too small leads to increased IO, sizing the memory regions too big leads to inefficient use of memory and an increase in memory latency most notably because of swapping.

On Linux, there is a fair amount of memory information available, however it is not obvious how to use that information, which frequently leads to inefficient use of memory, especially in today’s world of consolidation.

The information about linux server database usage is available in /proc/meminfo, and looks like this:

Starting an instance with sqlplus and running into ORA-27302: failure occurred at: skgpwinit6

Recently I was applying the data dictionary part from an (exadata bundle) patch and ran into the following errors:

Oracle 12.2 wait event ‘PGA memory operation’

When sifting through a sql_trace file from Oracle version 12.2, I noticed a new wait event: ‘PGA memory operation’:

WAIT #0x7ff225353470: nam='PGA memory operation' ela= 16 p1=131072 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=484 tim=15648003957

The current documentation has no description for it. Let’s see what V$EVENT_NAME says:

SQL> select event#, name, parameter1, parameter2, parameter3, wait_class 
  2  from v$event_name where name = 'PGA memory operation';

EVENT# NAME                                  PARAMETER1 PARAMETER2 PARAMETER3 WAIT_CLASS
------ ------------------------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------------
   524 PGA memory operation                                                   Other

Well, that doesn’t help…