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Oracle

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XVIII. Automatic Storage Management Won’t Let Me Use My Disk For My Files! Yes, It Will!

It’s been a long time since my last installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series and to be completely honest this particular topic isn’t really all that fit for a LTDCM installment because it covers something that is possible but less than expedient.  That said, there are new readers of this blog and maybe it’s time they google “Little Things Doth Crabby Make” to see where this series has been. This post might rustle up that curiosity!

So what is this blog post about? It’s about stuffing any file system file into Automatic Storage Management space. OK, so maybe this is just morbid curiosity or trivial pursuit. Maybe it’s just a parlor trick. I would agree with any of those descriptions. Nonetheless maybe there are 42 or so people out there who didn’t know this. If so, this post is for them.

Scrutinizing Exadata X5 Datasheet IOPS Claims…and Correcting Mistakes

I want to make these two points right out of the gate:

  1. I do not question Oracle’s IOPS claims in Exadata datasheets
  2. Everyone makes mistakes

Everyone Makes Mistakes

Like me. On January 21, 2015, Oracle announced the X5 generation of Exadata. I spent some time studying the datasheets from this product family and also compared the information to prior generations of Exadata namely the X3 and X4. Yesterday I graphed some of the datasheet numbers from these Exadata products and tweeted the graphs. I’m sorry  to report that two of the graphs were faulty–the result of hasty cut and paste. This post will clear up the mistakes but I owe an apology to Oracle for incorrectly graphing their datasheet information. Everyone makes mistakes. I fess up when I do. I am posting the fixed slides but will link to the deprecated slides at the end of this post.

In-memory DB

A recent thread on the OTN database forum supplied some code that seemed to show that In-memory DB made no difference to performance when compared with the traditional row-store mechanism and asked why not.  (It looked as if the answer was that almost all the time for the tests was spent returning the 3M row result set to the SQL*Plus client 15 rows at a time.)

The responses on the thread led to the question:  Why would the in-memory (column-store) database be faster than simply having the (row-store) data fully cached in the buffer cache ?

Deploying Application Express with Delphix

VDBs

Seamless cloning of an application stack is an outstanding goal. Seamless cloning of an application stack including the full production database, application server, and webserver in a few minutes with next to zero disk space used or configuration required is the best goal since Alexander Graham Bell decided he wanted a better way tell Mr. Watson to “come here.”

Oracle on GitHub

There has been a lot of activity on https://github.com/oracle lately. Apparently a place to keep…

LOB Space

Following on from a recent “check the space” posting, here’s another case of the code not reporting what you thought it would, prompted by a question on the OTN database forum about a huge space discrepancy in LOBs.

There’s a fairly well-known package called dbms_space that can give you a fairly good idea of the space used by a segment stored in a tablespace that’s using automatic segment space management. But what can you think when a piece of code (written by Tom Kyte, no less) reports the following stats about your biggest LOB segment:

Cluster Cache Coherency in EM12c

January is winding down and RMOUG Training Days 2015 is just around the corner, taking up much of my after work hours.

With that, we are going to discuss a great performance console in the EM12c cloud control-  Cluster Cache Coherency.

Bitmap Counts

In an earlier (not very serious) post about count(*) I pointed out how the optimizer sometimes does a redundant “bitmap conversion to rowid” when counting. In the basic count(*) example I showed this wasn’t a realistic issue unless you had set cursor_sharing to “force” (or the now-deprecated “similar”). There are, however, some cases where the optimizer can do this in more realistic circumstances and this posting models a scenario I came across a few years ago. The exact execution path has changed over time (i.e. version) but the anomaly persists, even in 12.1.0.2.

First we create a “fact” table and a dimension table, with a bitmap index on the fact table and a corresponding primary key on the dimension table:

Spatial space

One thing you (ought to) learn very early on in an Oracle career is that there are always cases you haven’t previously considered. It’s a feature that is frequently the downfall of “I found it on the internet” SQL.  Here’s one (heavily paraphrased) example that appeared on the OTN database forum a few days ago:

select table_name,round((blocks*8),2)||’kb’ “size” from user_tables where table_name = ‘MYTABLE';

select table_name,round((num_rows*avg_row_len/1024),2)||’kb’ “size” from user_tables where table_name = ‘MYTABLE';

The result from the first query is 704 kb,  the result from the second is 25.4 kb … fragmentation, rebuild, CTAS etc. etc.

Bind Effects

A couple of days ago I highlighted an optimizer anomaly caused by the presence of an index with a descending column. This was a minor (unrelated) detail that appeared in a problem on OTN where the optimizer was using an index FULL scan when someone was expecting to see an index RANGE scan. My earlier posting supplies the SQL to create the table and indexes I used to model the problem – and in this posting I’ll explain the problem and answer the central question.