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Truncate 12c

Here’s one of those little improvements in 12c (including 12.1) that will probably end up being described as “little known features” in about 3 years time. Arguably it’s one of those little things that no-one should care about because it’s not the sort of thing you should do on a production system, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be seen in the wild.

Rather than simply state the feature I’m going to demonstrate it, starting with a little code to build a couple of tables with referential integrity:

Performing in the cloud – network latency

To me, ‘cloud computing’ is renting a compute resource to perform a task. In order to use that compute resource, you need to instruct it to do something, which is typically done via the network. If the task the compute resource needs to fulfil is being an application server or being a client or both in the case of an application server that uses an Oracle database, the network latency between the client of the database and the database server is a critical property.

Band Join 12c

One of the optimizer enhancements that appeared in 12.2 for SQL is the “band join”. that makes certain types of merge join much more  efficient.  Consider the following query (I’ll supply the SQL to create the demonstration at the end of the posting) which joins two tables of 10,000 rows each using a “between” predicate on a column which (just to make it easy to understand the size of the result set)  happens to be unique with sequential values though there’s no index or constraint in place:

Provisioning a VFile App to Connect to a VDB

I ran across an article from 2013 from Straight Talk on Agile Development by Alex Kuznetsov and it reminded me how long we’ve been battling for easier ways of doing agile in a RDBMS environments.

SLOB Use Cases By Industry Vendors. Learn SLOB, Speak The Experts’ Language.

For general SLOB information, please visit: https://kevinclosson.net/slob.

Introduction

This is just a quick blog entry to showcase a few of the publications from IT vendors showcasing SLOB. SLOB allows performance engineers to speak in short sentences. As I’ve pointed out before, SLOB is not used to test how well Oracle handles transaction. If you are worried that Oracle cannot handle transactions then you have bigger problems than what can be tested with SLOB. SLOB is how you test whether–or how well–a platform can satisfy SQL-driven database physical I/O.

Index bouncy scan

There’s a thread running on OTN at present about deleting huge volumes of duplicated data from a table (to reduce it from 1.1 billion to about 22 million rows). The thread isn’t what I’m going to talk about, though, other than quoting some numbers from it to explain what this post is about.

Preparing AWS for the Delphix Trial

There are more configurations for AWS than there are fish in the sea, but as the rush of folks arrive to test out the incredibly cool AWS Trial for Delphix, I’ll add my rendition of what to look for to know you’re AWS setup is prepped to successfully deploy.

My New Role at Delphix

I’ve been at Delphix for just over six months now.  In that time, I was working with a number of great people on a number of initiatives surrounding competitive, the company roadmap and some new initiatives.

ASSM Help

I’ve written a couple of articles in the past about the problems of ASSM spending a lot of time trying to find blocks with usable free space. Without doing a bit of rocket science with some x$ objects, or O/S tracing for the relevant calls, or enabling a couple of nasty events, it’s not easy proving that ASSM might be a significant factor in a performance problem – until you get to 12c Release 2 where a staggering number of related statistics appear in v$sysstat.

I’ve published the full list of statistics (without explanation) at the end of this note, but here’s just a short extract showing the changes in my session’s ASSM stats due to a little PL/SQL loop inserting 10,000 rows, one row at a time into an empty table with a single index:

DBaaS Performance

I don’t know how I missed it but Randolf Geist has been doing writing a series of posts on the performance of Oracle’s DBaaS offering, using a series of long-running tests to capture not only raw performance figures but also an indication of consistency. You can find all of these tests with a search URL on his blog, but I’ve also created a little index here to make it easier for me to access them in order.