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Taking Notes – 2

[Originally written August 2015, but not previously published]

If I’m taking notes in a presentation that you’re giving there are essentially four possible reasons:

  • You’ve said something interesting that I didn’t know and I’m going to check it and think about the consequences
  • You’ve said something that I knew but you’ve said it in a way that made me think of some possible consequences that I need to check
  • You’ve said something that I think is wrong or out of date and I need to check it
  • You’ve said something that has given me a brilliant idea for solving a problem I’ve had to work around in the past and I need to work out the details

Any which way, if I’m taking notes it means I’ve probably just added a few more hours of work to my todo list.

Footnote

“Checking” can include:

Philosophy

Here’s a note I’ve just re-discovered – at the time I was probably planning to extend it into a longer article but I’ve decided to publish the condensed form straight away.

In a question to the Oak Table a couple of years ago (May 2015) Cary Millsap asked the following:

If you had an opportunity to tell a wide audience of system owners, users, managers, project leaders, system architects, DBAs, and developers “The most important things you should know about Oracle” what would you tell them?

I imagine that since then Cary has probably discussed the pros and cons of some of the resulting thoughts in one of his excellent presentations on how to do the right things, but this was my quick response:

If I had to address them all at once it would be time to go more philosophical than technical.

Assumptions

As the years roll on I’ve found it harder and harder to supply quick answers to “simple” questions on the Oracle-L list server and OTN/ODC forum because things are constantly changing and an answer that may have been right the last time I checked could now be wrong. A simple example of the consequences of change showed up recently on the OTN/ODC forum where one reply to a question started:

Just why do you need distinct in a subquery??? That’s the first thing that appears really shocking to me. If it’s a simple in (select …) adding a distinct to the subquery would just impose a sort unique(as you can see in the explain plan), which may be quite costly.

18c Read Only Oracle Home

Capture18c000This is the big new feature of Oracle 18c about database software installation. Something that was needed for decades for the ease of software deployment. Piet de Visser raised this to Oracle a long time ago, and we were talking about that recently when discussing this new excitement to deploy software in Docker containers. Docker containers are by definition immutable images. You need a Read Only Oracle Home, all the immutable files (configuration, logs, database) being in an external volume. Then, to upgrade the software, you just open this volume with an image of the new database version.

(DESCRIPTION_LIST=(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(FAILOVER=YES)(LOAD_BALANCE=NO)

Do you have complex connection strings with DESCRIPTION_LIST, DESCRIPTION, ADDRESS_LIST, ADDRESS and a nice combination of FAILOVER and LOAD_BALANCE? You probably checked the documentation, telling you that FAILOVER=YES is the default at all levels, but LOAD_BALANCE=YES is the default only for DESCRIPTION_LIST. But when disaster recovery and availability is concerned, the documentation is not sufficient. I want to test it. And here is how I do it.

I don’t want to test it with the real configuration and stop the different instances. And I don’t need to. My way to test an address list is to define a tnsnames.ora with the connection string, such as the following:

Full page logging in Postgres and Oracle

In my opinion, the volume of logging (aka redo log, aka xlog, aka WAL) is the most important factor for OLTP performance, availability and scalability, for several reasons:

  • This is the only structure where disk latency is a mandatory component of response time
  • This is a big part of the total volume of backups
  • This is sequential by nature, and very difficult to scale by parallelizing

In this post, I look at the volume of logging generated by some DML in Postgres and Oracle. I know Oracle quite well and just start to look at Postgres. The comparison here is not a contest but a way to better understand. For example, the default behavior of Postgres, with full_page_writes=on, is very similar to Oracle ‘begin backup’ mode. The comparison makes no sense for most of Postgres DBAs, but probably helps Oracle DBAs to understand it.

Join Factorization

This item is, by a roundabout route, a follow-up to yesterday’s note on a critical difference in cardinality estimates that appeared if you used the coalesce() function in its simplest form as a substitute for the nvl() function. Connor McDonald wrote a followup note about how using the nvl() function in a suitable predicate could lead to Oracle splitting a query into a UNION ALL (in version 12.2), which led me to go back to a note I’d written on the same topic about 10 years earlier where the precursor of this feature already existed but used CONCATENATION instead of OR-EXPANSION.

Coalesce v. NVL

“Modern” SQL should use the coalesce() function rather than the nvl() function – or so the story goes – but do you always want to do that to an Oracle database ? The answer is “maybe not”. Although the coalesce() function can emulate the nvl() function (in many cases) there are significant differences in behaviour, some that suggest it’s a good idea to use the substitution and others that suggest otherwise. Different decisions may be appropriate for different circumstances, and this note highlights one case against the substitution. We’ll start with a simple data set:

V$MYSTAT delta values

Here is a little script I use from time to time to look at V$MYSTAT values and displaying on one line a set of statistics with their delta value between two calls.

The first script, _mystat_init.sql, initializes the variables. The second one displays the values, such as:

SQL> @ _mystat_diff.sql
 
db block changes redo size undo change vector size redo entries
---------------- ---------------- ----------------------- ----------------
57,371 15,445,852 6,111,608 37,709

A look into Oracle redo, part 3: log writer work cycle overview

This is the third part of a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous part talked about the memory area that stores redo strand information: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/.

The single most important process in the Oracle database for handling redo is the log writer, which primary task is flushing the redo information other Oracle database processes put in the public redo strands to disk. Now that we have investigated the public redo strands and concurrency (first part) and kcrfsg_ and the KCRFA structure (second part), it seems logical to me to look at the log writer.