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Silent Installation of Grid Infrastructure

Introduction

Recently I had a requirement to install the Grid Infrastructure and Oracle RDBMS on a completely new VM. The customer I was doing this work for wanted to take a copy of their Production environment to another server so they could test an upgrade of their existing environment from Oracle GI / RDBMS 12.1 to 12.2. So they built a VM for me, copied the 12.1 installation media for both GI and the RDBMS and said “Go for it!”

I decided to log everything I did and write a series of blog posts based on my experience, in case it was of use to others. There were a few issues I needed to deal with for this customer. Some of those issues were:

12cR2 PDB archive

In 12.1 we had the possibility to unplug a PDB by closing it and generating a .xml file that describes the PDB metadata required to plug the datafiles into another CDB.
In 12.2 we got an additional possibility to have this .xml file zipped together with the datafiles, for an easy transport. But that was not working for ASM files.
The latest Release Update, Oct 17 includes the patch that fixes this issue and is the occasion to show PDB archive.

Here is Oracle 12.2.0.1 with Oct 2017 (https://updates.oracle.com/download/26737266.html) applied (needs latest OPatch https://updates.oracle.com/download/6880880.html)
With a PDB1 pluggable database:

[oracle@VM106 ~]$ rman target /
 

RMOUG Training Days 2018

So Training Days is coming up in two weeks.  You haven’t registered to attend?  How you feeling about that?

Rocky Mountain Oracle User Group, (RMOUG) has the largest Oracle user group grassroots conference each February.  For the 2018 year, we decided to shake it up with:

JAN18: Database 11gR2 PSU, 12cR1 ProactiveBP, 12cR2 RU

If you want to apply the latest patches (and you should), you can go to the My Oracle Support Recommended Patch Advisor. But sometimes it is not up-todate. For example, for 12.1.0.2 only the PSU is displayed and not the Proactive Bundle Patch, which is highly recommended. And across releases, the names have changed and can be misleading: PSU for 11.2.0.4 (no Proactive Bundle Patch except for Engineered Systems). 12.1.0.2 can have SPU, PSU, or Proactive BP but the latest is highly recommended, especially now that it includes the adaptive statistics patches. 12.2.0.1 introduce the new RUR and RU, the latest one being the one recommended.

Where in the World is Goth Girl- Cleveland Edition

I’ve returned from SQL Saturday Cleveland after presenting “Linux Performance Essentials for the SQL Server DBA”.  The event had 30% women speakers, which is incredible for a technical event.  I’m thrilled with the attendance and although my session went through a lot of Linux in an hour, people didn’t leave looking like their brains were going to explode, so mission accomplished.

Multitenant, PDB, ‘save state’, services and standby databases

Creating – and using – your own services has always been the recommendation. You can connect to a database without a service name, though the instance SID, but this is not what you should do. Each database registers its db_unique_name as a service, and you can use it to connect, but it is always better to create your own application service(s). In multitenant, each PDB registers its name as a service, but the recommendation is still there: create your own services, and connect with your services.
I’ll show in this blog post what happens if you use the PDB name as a service and the standby database registers to the same listener as the primary database. Of course, you can workaround the non-unique service names by registering to different listeners. But this just hides the problem. The main reason to use services is to be independent from physical attributes, so being forced to assign a specific TCP/IP port is not better than using an instance SID.

A look into Oracle redo, part 2: the discovery of the KCRFA structure

This is the second post in a series of blogposts on Oracle database redo internals. If you landed on this blogpost without having read the first blogpost, here is a link to the first blogpost: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/ The first blogpost contains all the versions used and a synopsis on what the purpose of this series of blogposts is.

In the first part, I showed how the principal access to the public redo strands is controlled by redo allocation latches, and showed a snippet of trace information of memory accesses of a foreground session when using the first public redo strand:

UNDO sizing

90% databases that I see for the first time have the same issue with UNDO tablespace: it’s over sized, yet still causing infamous ORA-1555 errors at times. Here is why.

Conferences 2017

Last year I’ve been to a few conferences. At some point I thought I need to record some of the sessions to let more people see them as well.
So I took a cheap action camera & recorded several presentations. Video quality is not good (mostly) due to lighting but still is enough to get an idea of how was it back there in a room.
Here’re links to the videos. Enjoy!

Hatem Mahmoud – Memory Access Tracing/Profiling

Jonathan Lewis – Just Don’t Do It

Panel Discussion at POUG2017

Marcin Przepiorowski – dNFS for DBAs

Neil Chandler – Why Has My Plan Changed

Histogram Threat

Have you ever seen a result like this:


SQL> select sql_id, count(*) from V$sql group by sql_id having count(*) > 1000;

SQL_ID		COUNT(*)
------------- ----------
1dbzmt8gpg8x7	   30516

A client of mine who had recently upgraded to 12.2.0.1 RAC, using DRCP (database resident connection pooling) for an application using PHP was seeing exactly this type of behaviour for a small number of very simple SQL statements and wanted to find out what was going on because they were also seeing an undesirable level of contention in the library cache when the system load increased.

In this note I just want to highlight a particular detail of their problem – with an example – showing how easily histograms can introduce problems if you don’t keep an eye out for the dangers.

One of their queries really was as simple as this: