Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

oradebug

[Oracle] Trace back to responsible SQL or PL/SQL code for a particular (PGA) memory request by intercepting process with DTrace

Introduction

This is just a short blog post about a simple DTrace script (dtrace_kghal_pga_code), that i recently wrote and published due to a PGA memory leak troubleshooting assignment. A client of mine noticed a major PGA memory increase after upgrading to Oracle 12c. The PL/SQL code did not change - just the database release. He already troubleshooted the issue with help of Tanel Poder's blog post "Oracle Memory Troubleshooting, Part 4: Drilling down into PGA memory usage with V$PROCESS_MEMORY_DETAIL" and identified the corresponding heap and allocation reason.

Oracle 12 and latches, part 3

This post is about manually calling and freeing a shared latch. Credits should go to Andrey Nikolaev, who has this covered in his presentation which was presented at UKOUG Tech 15. I am very sorry to see I did miss it.

Essentially, if you follow my Oracle 12 and shared latches part 2 blogpost, which is about shared latches, I showed how to get a shared latch:

SQL> oradebug setmypid
Statement processed.
SQL> oradebug call ksl_get_shared_latch 0x94af8768 1 0 2303 16
Function returned 1

Which works okay, but leaves a bit of a mess when freed:

Oracle 12 and latches

Oracle DBAs who are so old that they remember the days before Oracle 11.2 probably remember the tuning efforts for latches. I can still recall the latch number for cache buffers chains from the top of my head: number 98. In the older days this was another number, 157.

But it seems latches have become less of a problem in the modern days of Oracle 11.2 and higher. Still, when I generate heavy concurrency I can see some latch waits. (I am talking about you and SLOB mister Closson).

I decided to look into latches on Oracle 12.1.0.2 instance on Oracle Linux 7. This might also be a good time to go through how you think they work for yourself, it might be different than you think or have been taught.

[Oracle] Researching internal latch implementation (ksl_get_shared_latch, kslfre, kslgetsl_w) and crashing PMON

Introduction

Last week the DOAG 2014 conference took place in Nuremberg and it was a blast with a lot of useful presentations and especially great conversations and meet ups with Oracle friends. I had a nice talk about the Oracle latch implementation with a participant, who told me that his instance crashes every time, if he (manually) sets a shared latch in exclusive mode and tries to release it afterwards. It sounded really interesting as i have done this so many times without ever noticing such an issue. He also told me that this issue is reproducible at least on Oracle 11g R2 and 12c R1. I had no immediate answer or clue about the described issue and needed to research it furthermore.

[Oracle] - New diagnostic event "wait_event[]" (and others) for troubleshooting / researching purpose with Oracle 12c

Introduction

A long time has gone since my last blog post on SCN in March 2014, but i was quite busy with Oracle RAC implementations and troubleshooting performance issues in the last month. It was a quite interesting time for me and i have learned a lot of new stuff about Oracle 12c and so in consequence this is just a tiny blog post about a new diagnostic event called "wait_event[]", which was introduced with Oracle 12c R1 (12.1.0.1). Oracle has re-engineered its kernel diagnostics & tracing infrastructure with Oracle 11g, which allows you to be much more detailed and extensive by tracing and dumping diagnostic / low level (internals) information. Please check the reference section for more detailed information about that "new" kernel diagnostics & tracing infrastructure, if you have never heard of it until yet.