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parallel query

That demned elusive PQ slave

With apologies to Emma Orczy for stealing a line from “The Scarlet Pimpernel” … </p />
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Exadataを支える技術4 マルチコアCPUによるParallel Queryの実現


各サーバはIntel Xeon 7560プロセッサ(2010年9月バージョン)を2基搭載したマザーボードで構成されDB Server1台で:4コア x 2 = 8コアとなっている

Sun,IBM,HPといったサーバメーカによるSMPマシン競争の時代が終わりました。今はIntelとAMDの2社による汎用プロセッサーによるマルチコア対応の時代となりました。
Exadataでは、その中で最も高価なIntel Xeonをdual構成で使っています。

The Core Performance Fundamentals Of Oracle Data Warehousing – Parallel Execution

[back to Introduction] Leveraging Oracle’s Parallel Execution (PX) in your Oracle data warehouse is probably the most important feature/technology one can use to speed up operations on large data sets.  PX is not, however, “go fast” magic pixi dust for any old operation (if thats what you think, you probably don’t understand the parallel computing paradigm). With Oracle PX, a large task is broken up into smaller parts, sub-tasks if you will, and each sub-task is then worked on in parallel.  The goal of Oracle PX: divide and conquer.  This allows a significant amount of hardware resources to be engaged in solving a single problem and is what allows the Oracle database to scale up and out when working with large data sets. I though I’d touch on some basics and add my observations but this is by far not an exhaustive write up on Oracle’s Parallel Execution.  There is an entire chapter in the Oracle Database documentation on PX as well as several white papers.  I’ve listed all these in the Resources section at the bottom of this post.  Read them, but as always, feel free to post questions/comments here.  Discussion adds great value. A Basic Example of Parallel Execution [...]

RAC, parallel query and udpsnoop

I presented about various performance myths in my ‘battle of the nodes’ presentation. One of the myth was that how spawning parallel query slaves across multiple RAC instances can cause major bottleneck in the interconnect. In fact, that myth was direct result of a lessons learnt presentation from a client engagement. Client was suffering from performance issues with enormous global cache waits running in to 30+ms average response time for global cache CR traffic and crippling application performance. Essentially, their data warehouse queries were performing hundreds of parallel queries concurrently with slaves spawning across three node RAC instances.

Of course, I had to hide the client details and simplified using a test case to explain the myth. Looks like either a)my test case is bad or b) some sort of bug I encountered in 9.2.0.5 version c) I made a mistake in my analysis somewhere. Most likely it is the last one :-( . Greg Rahn questioned that example and this topic deserves more research to understand this little bit further. At this point, I don’t have 9.2.0.5 and database is in 10.2.0.4 and so we will test this in 10.2.0.4.

udpsnoop

UDP is one of the protocol used for cache fusion traffic in RAC and it is the Oracle recommended protocol. In this article, UDP traffic size must be measured. Measuring Global cache traffic using AWR reports was not precise. So, I decided to use a dtrace tool kit tool:udpsnoop.d to measure the traffic between RAC nodes. There are two RAC nodes in this setup. You can read more about udpsnoop.d. That tool udpsnoop.d can be downloaded from dtrace toolkit . Output of this script is of the form: