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Shrink Space

I have never been keen on the option to “shrink space” for a table because of the negative impact it can have on performance.

I don’t seem to have written about it in the blog but I think there’s something in one of my books pointing out that the command moves data from the “end” of the table (high extent ids) to the “start” of the table (low extent ids) by scanning the table backwards to find data that can be moved and scanning forwards to find space to put it. This strategy can have the effect of increasing the scattering of the data that you’re interested in querying if most of your queries are about “recent” data, and you have a pattern of slowing deleting aging data. (You may end up doing a range scan through a couple of hundred table blocks for data at the start of the table that was once packed into a few blocks near the end of the table.)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Add ORDER BY to make ANY query faster

Yes it’s SCBT day here in Perth!

SCBT = Silly Click Bait Title Smile

This post is just a cautionary tale that it is easy to get caught up judging SQL performance solely on a few metrics rather than taking a more common sense approach of assessing performance based on the true requirements of the relevant component of the application.  I say “true requirements” because it may vary depending on what is important to the application for a particular component.

Using colplot to visualise performance data

Back in 2011 I wrote a blog post about colplot but at that time focused on running the plot engine backed by a web server. However some people might not want to take this approach, and thinking about security it might not be the best idea in the world anyway. A port that isn’t opened can’t be scanned for vulnerabilities…

So what is colplot anyway? And why this follow-up to a 7 year old post?

Oracle wait event ‘TCP Socket (KGAS)’

I was asked some time ago what the Oracle database event ‘TCP socket (KGAS)’ means. This blogpost is a deep dive into what this event times in Oracle database 12.1.0.2.180717.

This event is not normally seen, only when TCP connections are initiated from the database using packages like UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP and the one used in this article, UTL_HTTP.

A very basic explanation is this event times the time that a database foreground session spends on TCP connection management and communicating over TCP, excluding client and database link (sqlnet) networking. If you trace the system calls, you see that mostly that is working with a (network) socket. Part of the code in the oracle database that is managing that, sits in the kernel code layer kgas, kernel generic (of which I am quite sure, and then my guess:) asynchronous services, which explains the naming of the event.

Gooey GUIDs

Do a quick Google search and you’ll find plenty of blog posts about why GUIDs are superior to integers for a unique identifier, and of course, an equal number of posts about why integers are superior to GUIDs. In the Oracle world, most people have been using sequence numbers since they were pretty much the only option available to us in earlier versions. But developers coming from other platforms often prefer GUIDs simply due to their familiarity with them.

All about headroom and mandatory patching before June 2019

This post was triggered upon rereading a blogpost by Mike Dietrich called databases need patched minimum april 2019. Mike’s blogpost makes it clear this is about databases that are connected using database links, and that:
– Newer databases do not need additional patching for this issue (11.2.0.4, 12.1.0.2, 12.2 and newer).
– Recent PSU patches contain a fix for certain older versions (11.1.0.7, 11.2.0.3 and 12.1.0.1).
– This means versions 11.2.0.2 and earlier 11.2 versions, 11.1.0.6 and earlier and anything at version 10 or earlier can not be fixed and thus are affected.

But what is the actual issue?

Power BI 101- Logging and Tracing, Part III

Power BI, like many Microsoft products, is multi-threaded.  This can be seen from the logs and even the Task Manager.  I know, I know…you’ve probably heard this part all before…

The importance of this information, is that the logs will display Process IDs, (PID) that are separate from the main Power BI Desktop executable, including the secondary processes..  Moving from the Power BI logs that reside in the Performance folder, (see Part I here) we can view and connect the PIDs and TID, (Transaction IDs) to information from the Task Manager and the data displayed: