Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 38 guests online.

Recent comments

Affiliations

performance

Exadata storage indexes and DML

Last week I’ve gotten a question on how storage indexes (SI) behave when the table for which the SI is holding data is changed. Based on logical reasoning, it can be two things: the SI is invalidated because the data it’s holding is changed, or the SI is updated to reflect the change. Think about this for yourself, and pick a choice. I would love to hear if you did choose the correct one.

First let’s do a step back and lay some groundwork first. The tests done in this blogpost are done on an actual Exadata (V2 hardware), with Oracle version 11.2.0.4.6 (meaning bundle patch 6). The Exadata “cellos” (Cell O/S) version is 11.2.3.3.1.140529.1 on both the compute nodes and the storage nodes.

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.1 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version in particular supports now the new 12c "Adaptive" plan feature - previous versions don't cope very well with those if you don't add the "ADAPTIVE" formatting option manually.

Here are the notes from the change log:

- GV$SQL_MONITOR and GV$SQL_PLAN_MONITOR can now be customized in the
settings as table names in case you want to use your own custom monitoring repository that copies data from GV$SQL_MONITOR and GV$SQL_PLAN_MONITOR in order to keep/persist monitoring data. The tables need to have at least those columns that are used by XPLAN_ASH from the original views

Delete Costs

One of the quirky little anomalies of the optimizer is that it’s not allowed to select rows from a table after doing an index fast full scan (index_ffs) even if it is obviously the most efficient (or, perhaps, least inefficient) strategy. For example:

Delete Costs

One of the quirky little anomalies of the optimizer is that it’s not allowed to select rows from a table after doing an index fast full scan (index_ffs) even if it is obviously the most efficient (or, perhaps, least inefficient) strategy. For example:

FIRST_ROWS_n Optimizer Mode – What is Wrong with this Statement?

June 8, 2014 It has been nearly two years since I last wrote a review of an Oracle Database related book, although I have recently written reviews of two Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 books and a handful of security cameras in the last two years.  My copy of the second edition of the “Troubleshooting Oracle […]

FIRST_ROWS_n Optimizer Mode – What is Wrong with this Statement?

June 8, 2014 It has been nearly two years since I last wrote a review of an Oracle Database related book, although I have recently written reviews of two Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 books and a handful of security cameras in the last two years.  My copy of the second edition of the “Troubleshooting Oracle […]

Oracle Real-World Performance – E-Learning Video’s

You might have noticed…or not…but the Oracle Real World Performance team has posted multiple cool E-Learning YouTube video posts. The very educational and demo rich...
class="readmore">Read More

Simora: Alpha Testers Confirmed

It's been a while since I provided any public updates regarding Simora, our Oracle workload simulation product. It's finally time to unveil the status of Simora and our steps moving forwards. We have been working extensively on the Simora engine and infrastructure over the  last several months, with a view to transforming it into a […]

Simora: Alpha Testers Confirmed

It's been a while since I provided any public updates regarding Simora, our Oracle workload simulation product. It's finally time to unveil the status of Simora and our steps moving forwards. We have been working extensively on the Simora engine and infrastructure over the  last several months, with a view to transforming it into a […]

Systemtap revisited

Some time back, I investigated the options to do profiling of processes in Linux. One of the things I investigated was systemtap. After careful investigation I came to the conclusion that systemtap was not really useful for my investigations, because it only worked in kernelspace, only very limited in userspace. The limitation of working in userspace was that you had to define your own markers in the source code of the program you wanted to profile with systemtap and compile that. Since my investigations are mostly around Oracle products, which are closed source, this doesn’t help me at all.