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performance

Functions & Subqueries

I think the “mini-series” is a really nice blogging concept – it can pull together a number of short articles to offer a much better learning experience for the reader than they could get from the random collection of sound-bites that so often typifies an internet search; so here’s my recommendation for this week’s mini-series: a set of articles by Sayan Malakshinov a couple of years ago comparing the behaviour of Deterministic Functions and Scalar Subquery Caching.

http://orasql.org/2013/02/10/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-1/

http://orasql.org/2013/02/11/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-2/

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility - In-Memory Support

A new version 4.21 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download. I publish this version because it will be used in the recent video tutorials explaining the Active Session History functionality of the script.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This is mainly a maintenance release that fixes some incompatibilities of the 4.2 version with less recent versions (10.2 and 11.2.0.1).

As an extra however, this version now differentiates between general CPU usage and in-memory CPU usage (similar to 12.1.0.2 Real-Time SQL Monitoring). This is not done in all possible sections of the output yet, but the most important ones are already covered.

Cluster Cache Coherency in EM12c

January is winding down and RMOUG Training Days 2015 is just around the corner, taking up much of my after work hours.

With that, we are going to discuss a great performance console in the EM12c cloud control-  Cluster Cache Coherency.

Bitmap Counts

In an earlier (not very serious) post about count(*) I pointed out how the optimizer sometimes does a redundant “bitmap conversion to rowid” when counting. In the basic count(*) example I showed this wasn’t a realistic issue unless you had set cursor_sharing to “force” (or the now-deprecated “similar”). There are, however, some cases where the optimizer can do this in more realistic circumstances and this posting models a scenario I came across a few years ago. The exact execution path has changed over time (i.e. version) but the anomaly persists, even in 12.1.0.2.

First we create a “fact” table and a dimension table, with a bitmap index on the fact table and a corresponding primary key on the dimension table:

The info in OTHER_XML of view DBA_HIST_SQL_PLAN

I had some time to spend, killing time, and thought about something that was “on…

Using Database In-Memory Column Store with Complex Datatypes

From those who are interested, hereby my slide deck I used during UKOUG Tech14, regarding…

Most Recent

There’s a thread on the OTN database forum at present asking for advice on optimising a query that’s trying to find “the most recent price” for a transaction given that each transaction is for a stock item on a given date, and each item has a history of prices where each historic price has an effective start date. This means the price for a transaction is the price as at the most recent date prior to the transaction date.

Count (*)

The old chestnut about comparing speeds of count(*), count(1), count(non_null_column) and count(pk_column) has come up in the OTN database forum (at least) twice in the last couple of months. The standard answer is to point out that they will all execute the same code, and that the corroborating evidence for that claim is that, for a long time, the 10053 trace files have had a rubric reporting: CNT – count(col) to count(*) transformation or, for an even longer time, that the error message file (oraus.msg for the English Language version) has had an error code 10122 which produced (from at least Oracle 8i, if not 7.3):

Re-optimization

The spelling is with a Z rather than an S because it’s an Oracle thing.

Tim Hall has just published a set of notes on Adaptive Query Optimization, so I thought I’d throw in one extra little detail.

When the optimizer decides that a query execution plan involves some guesswork the run-time engine can monitor the execution of the query and collect some information that may allow the optimizer to produce a better execution plan. The interaction between all the re-optimization mechanisms can get very messy, so I’m not going to try to cover all the possibilities – read Tim’s notes for that – but one of the ways in which this type of information can be kept is now visible in a dynamic performance view.

Just in case

For those who don’t read Oracle-l and haven’t found Nikolay Savvinov’s blog, here’s a little note pulling together a recent question on Oracle-L and a relevant (and probably unexpected) observation from the blog. The question (paraphrased) was:

The developers/data modelers are creating all the tables with varchar2(4000) as standard by default “Just in case we need it”. What do you think of this idea?