Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 28 guests online.

Recent comments

performance

Counting

There’s a live example on OTN at the moment of an interesting class of problem that can require some imaginative thinking. It revolves around a design that uses a row in one table to hold the low and high values for a range of values in another table. The problem is then simply to count the number of rows in the second table that fall into the range given by the first table. There’s an obvious query you can write (a join with inequality) but if you have to join each row in the first table to several million rows in the second table, then aggregate to count them, that’s an expensive strategy.  Here’s the query (with numbers of rows involved) that showed up on OTN; it’s an insert statement, and the problem is that it takes 7 hours to insert 37,600 rows:

Tuning Database XQuery Statements (2)

So we concluded the post “Tuning Database XQuery Statements (1)” with the following SQL statement…

Tuning Database XQuery Statements (1)

I had a question of a colleague to have a look at a statement that…

Presentation material & E-learning videos – In-Memory Column Store Workshop with Maria Colgan

You can now download and have another look at the presentations used during the In-Memory…

In Memory XML Performance (XVM)

I wouldn’t believe the bad XMLType performance statement given stated in Martin Preiss’ blog post,…

DBMS_INMEMORY_ADVISOR

When you follow the Oracle in-memory / optimizer team, then you have probably seen this…

255 columns

You all know that having more than 255 columns in a table is a Bad Thing ™ – and surprisingly you don’t even have to get to 255 to hit the first bad thing about wide tables. If you’ve ever wondered what sorts of problems you can have, here are a few:

To N or Not to N, is SYS_OP_C2C the Question; Oracle NVARCHAR Slow?

February 8, 2015 I was recently contacted about an odd performance issue with a software product named TDM, where certain SQL statements submitted to an Oracle 9.2.x database required roughly 30 seconds to execute when a nearly instantaneous response was expected.  The person who reported the issue to me provided a sample SQL statement that […]

Functions & Subqueries

I think the “mini-series” is a really nice blogging concept – it can pull together a number of short articles to offer a much better learning experience for the reader than they could get from the random collection of sound-bites that so often typifies an internet search; so here’s my recommendation for this week’s mini-series: a set of articles by Sayan Malakshinov a couple of years ago comparing the behaviour of Deterministic Functions and Scalar Subquery Caching.

http://orasql.org/2013/02/10/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-1/

http://orasql.org/2013/02/11/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-2/

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility - In-Memory Support

A new version 4.21 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download. I publish this version because it will be used in the recent video tutorials explaining the Active Session History functionality of the script.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This is mainly a maintenance release that fixes some incompatibilities of the 4.2 version with less recent versions (10.2 and 11.2.0.1).

As an extra however, this version now differentiates between general CPU usage and in-memory CPU usage (similar to 12.1.0.2 Real-Time SQL Monitoring). This is not done in all possible sections of the output yet, but the most important ones are already covered.