performance

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 4 - Network

In the last part of this installment I'll have a brief look at the network performance measured in the Oracle DBaaS environment, in particular the network interface that gets used as private interconnect in case of RAC configuration. The network performance could also be relevant when evaluating how to transfer data to the cloud database.

I've used the freely available "iperf" tool to measure the network bandwidth and got the following results:

[root@test12102rac2 ~]# iperf3 -c 10.196.49.126
Connecting to host 10.196.49.126, port 5201
[  4] local 10.196.49.130 port 41647 connected to 10.196.49.126 port 5201

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 3 - Storage - 12.2 Update

Recently I repeated the I/O related tests on a 12.2.0.1 instance for curiosity and was surprised by the fact that I consistently got significantly better results as on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2.

Now you're probably aware that the version 12.2 so far is "cloud-only", so I can't tell / test whether the version 12.2 is generically providing that increased performance or whether Oracle has optimized the underlying stack, so that previous versions in general could also benefit from better performance if they ran on the same platform. Repeated tests with versions 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2 confirmed the performance figures reported in the previous installment of this series, so as of the time of writing it's only the version 12.2 that provides the improved I/O performance.

Note that as of the time of writing only a single instance configuration was supported with version 12.2, so I wasn't able to run the tests in RAC configuration.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 2 - Storage

In this second part of this installment I'll focus on the performance figures related to I/O encountered when the corresponding tests were performed on the platform.

IOPS

When running with minimum sized buffer cache, direct and asynchronous I/O enabled, the following average read-only IOPS figures were measured over a period of several days (this is the test described in part three of the "performance consistency" series) .

First, running on a 4 OCPU single instance configuration (8 CPUs / 8 cores as outlined in the previous part) with either four or eight sessions:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 1 - CPU

After having looked at the performance consistency provided by the Oracle Database Cloud offering in the previous series, I'll focus here on the raw performance figures I've measured during my tests, starting with the CPU related performance findings.

One of the first surprises is related to the fact that Oracle uses a unit called "OCPU" to specify the CPU capacity provided, which is explained here:

Why oh Why Do We Still Not Have a Fast Bulk “SQL*Unloader” Facility?

Way back in 2004 I was working at the UK side of the Human Genome project. We were creating a massive store of DNA sequences in an Oracle database (this was one of two world-wide available stores of this information, for free & open use by anyone {* see note!}). The database was, for back then, enormous at 5-6TB. And we knew it would approx double every 12 months (and it did, it was 28TB when I had to migrate it to Oracle 10 in 2006, over 40TB 6 months later and grew to half a petabyte before it was moved to another organisation). And were contemplating storing similar massive volumes in Oracle – Protein, RNA and other sequence stores, huge numbers of cytological images (sorry, microscope slides).

Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?

The last year at DSSD (now a part of Dell EMC) has been an extremely interesting one for me, and I’ve learned a great deal, which is always good. Some of the lessons have been surprising, though… One of them is what I will rather dramatically refer to as Storage Stockholm Syndrome. Stockholm Syndrome is … Continue reading "Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?"

Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?

The last year at DSSD (now a part of Dell EMC) has been an extremely interesting one for me, and I’ve learned a great deal, which is always good. Some of the lessons have been surprising, though… One of them is what I will rather dramatically refer to as Storage Stockholm Syndrome. Stockholm Syndrome is … Continue reading "Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?"

Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?

The last year at DSSD (now a part of Dell EMC) has been an extremely interesting one for me, and I’ve learned a great deal, which is always good. Some of the lessons have been surprising, though… One of them is what I will rather dramatically refer to as Storage Stockholm Syndrome. Stockholm Syndrome is … Continue reading "Do you suffer from Storage Stockholm Syndrome?"

Delete/Insert

Many of the questions that appear on OTN are deceptively simple until you start thinking carefully about the implications; one such showed up a little while ago:

What i want to do is to delete rows from table where it matches condition upper(CATEGORY_DESCRIPTION) like ‘%BOOK%’.

At the same time i want these rows to be inserted into other table.

The first problem is this: how carefully does the requirement need to be stated before you can decide how to address it? Trying to imagine awkward scenarios, or boundary conditions, can help to clarify the issue.

If you delete before you insert, how do you find the data to insert ?