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performance

CR Trivia

Everybody “knows” that when you do a tablescan of a table that it starts with two buffer gets on the segment header, though older versions (ca. 8i and earlier) of Oracle used to do 4 buffer gets on the segment header. The upshot of this is that many people still say that if you create a table and insert a single row then you’re going to get 3 buffer gets when you tablescan a table: two for the segment header and one for the data block:

So here’s a test, with the second set of autotrace stats which, for reasons I’ll describe shortly, may not be immediately reproducible on your system:

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

NVL()

Here’s a point that’s probably fairly well-known, but worth repeating – nvl() and coalesce() aren’t identical in behaviour but you may have some cases where you’re using nvl() when coalesce() would be a more efficient option.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

When the Oracle wait interface isn’t enough, part 2: understanding measurements.

In my blogpost When the oracle wait interface isn’t enough I showed how a simple asynchronous direct path scan of a table was spending more than 99% of it’s time on CPU, and that perf showed me that 68% (of the total elapsed time) was spent on a spinlock unlock in the linux kernel which was called by io_submit().

This led to some very helpful comments from Tanel Poder. This blogpost is a materialisation of his comments, and tests to show the difference.

First take a look at what I gathered from ‘perf’ in the first article:

Null Quiz

Here’s an example I saw a few months ago of the confusion caused by NULL. As the owner of the problem put it: the first query, run from SQL*Plus for testing purposes, takes no time to complete; but when “put into a pl/sql cursor” (as shown in the second query) it takes ages to complete.

What’s going on ?


    select id
         , description
         , inventory
    from the_table
    where category =  nvl(null, category);

    --

    open c_results for
        select id
             , description
             , inventory
        from the_table
        where category =  nvl(p_user_category, category);
    fetch c_results into v_id, v_description, v_inventory;
    close c_results;

After pondering the problem for a while the OP managed to get the required level performance by changing the predicate to this:

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version of the XPLAN_ASH tool (detailed analysis of a single SQL statement execution) is available for download. The previous post includes links to video tutorials explaining what the tool is about.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

The new version comes with numerous improvements and new features. The most important ones are:

  • Real-Time SQL Monitoring info included
  • Complete coverage including recursive SQL
  • Improved performance
  • 12c compatible
  • Simplified usage

Drill Down the I/O stack at UKOUG Tech13

It's just under a week to go before the doors open for the UKOUG Tech13 conference and the adjoining OakTable World UK 2013 sessions, so I thought I would write a very short blog post about what I will be doing there, where I'll be, and what I'm looking forward to. This year I will […]

Drill Down the I/O stack at UKOUG Tech13

It's just under a week to go before the doors open for the UKOUG Tech13 conference and the adjoining OakTable World UK 2013 sessions, so I thought I would write a very short blog post about what I will be doing there, where I'll be, and what I'm looking forward to. This year I will […]