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Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.23 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version comes only with minor changes, see the change log below.

Here are the notes from the change log:

- Finally corrected the very old and wrong description of "wait times" in the script comments, where it was talking about "in-flight" wait events but that is not correct. ASH performs a "fix-up" of the last 255 samples or so and updates them with the time waited, so these wait events are not "in-flight"

- Removed some of the clean up code added in 4.22 to the beginning of the script, because it doesn't really help much but spooled script output always contained these error messages about non-existent column definitions being cleared

Conditional SQL- 6

An odd little anomaly showed up on the OTN database forum a few days ago where a query involving a table covered by Oracle Label Security (OLS) seemed to wrap itself into a non-mergeable view when written using traditional Oracle SQL, but allowed for view-merging when accessed through ANSI standard SQL. I don’t know why there’s a difference but it did prompt a thought about non-mergeable views and what I’ve previously called “conditional SQL” – namely SQL which holds a predicate that should have been tested in the client code and not passed to the database engine.

The thought was this – could the database engine decide to do a lot of redundant work if you stuck a silly predicate inside a non-mergeable view: the answer turns out to be yes. Here’s a demonstration I’ve run on 11g and 12c:

Uniquely parallel

Here’s a surprising (to me) execution plan from 12.1.0.2 – parallel execution to find one row in a table using a unique scan of a unique index – produced by running the following script (data creation SQL to follow):

Merge Precision

This note is about a little detail I hadn’t noticed about the merge command until a question came up on the OTN database forum a few days ago. The question was about the impact of the clustering_factor on the optimizer’s choice of execution plan – but the example supplied in the question displayed an oddity I couldn’t explain. Here’s the code and execution plan as originally supplied:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 1

As Oracle ACE Director I got an extended trial license for Oracle's Cloud offerings, in particular the "Database as a Service" offering. As part of the (ongoing) evaluation I try to get an idea how consistent the performance of such an service is, which might be one of the concerns one might have when considering cloud offerings in general.

For my tests I've set up a 11.2.0.4 single instance database using "4 OCPUs" (Oracle CPUs) which ends up as an Oracle Linux 6 system showing 8 CPUs *and* 8 cores of type "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2690 v2 @ 3.00GHz".

As edition for the database I've chosen the "Extreme Performance" Enterprise Edition which also shows up at the version banner (note the difference to regular database installations, not sure this might break some applications that don't know this banner):

Hotsos 2016 Recap

I wanted to go to Hotsos Symposium for quite some time, having heard so many great topics from there for years. And every time I was a bit lazy to think about what I can talk about. Apparently I thought that everything I know is well covered elsewhere, so why would I be accepted. Plus all these complexities of budget, getting a visa, travel arrangements, jet lag, and personal matters in between. Last year, when call for papers was still open, I realized that there’s a good chance I can make it to Hotsos in 2016: I had a budget, visa is a doable thing, and most importantly I knew I had a topic to talk about which most likely will not be in competition with other speakers.

Oracle Management Cloud – Log Analytics

In this last overview post I will give you a first glance of the Oracle…