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Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 5

This is the fifth part of this installment, and before coming to comparisons to other cloud providers, in this part I show the results of the read-only test that I've already described in part three of this series, but repeated at a later point in time. The test setup was identical and can be checked in the mentioned previous part.

The reason for running the test again was the fact that I was informed during the first test run that the zone that my Oracle Cloud domain was assigned to was temporarily overloaded, which I also noticed since I wasn't able to create new services for some time.

Hence I decided to repeat the tests after it was confirmed that the issue got resolved.

OTN Appreciation Day – Instrument Your Damned Code. Please!

Today is OTN Appreciation Day.

This day is the idea of Tim Hall, Mr OracleBase, and you can See his post here. The idea is that as a sign of appreciation to OTN we do a technical (or not so technical) post on a feature of Oracle we like. I’m going to visit an area I have mentioned before…

DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO.

OTN Appreciation Day: Breaking Barriers…In Memory

The stuff I liked most in the database releases of the last years is the…

My session workload

My old website (www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk) will be disappearing in a couple of weeks – but there are a couple of timeless articles on it that are worth saving and although the popularity of this one has probably been surpassed by Tanel Poder’s Snapper script, or other offerings by Tom Kyte or Adrian Billington, it’s still one of those useful little things to have around – it’s a package to takes a snapshot of your session stats.

The package depends on a view created in the SYS schema, and the package itself has to be installed in the SYS schema – which is why other strategies for collecting the information have become more popular; but if you want to have it handy, here are the two scripts:

Kill CPU

My old website (www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk) will be disappearing in a couple of weeks – but there are a couple of timeless articles on it that are worth saving and a method for soaking up all the CPU on your system with a simple SQL statement against a small data set is, surely, one of them. Here, then is a little script that I wrote (or, at least, formalised) 15 years ago to stress out a CPU:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 4

This is the fourth part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time the previous read-only test was modified to be a 100% update read-write test. So every row read was updated in the following way:

begin
  loop
    for rec in (
          select /*+
              index(t_o)
           */
          id_fk

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 3

#333333; font-family: "verdana" , "arial" , sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16.9px;">This is the third part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host.

Adaptive Cursor Sharing Fail

Here is another example (besides the fact that Adaptive Cursor Sharing only gets evaluated during a PARSE call (still valid in 12c) and supports a maximum of 14 bind variables) I've recently come across at a client site where the default implementation of Adaptive Cursor Sharing fails to create a more suitable execution plan for different bind variable values.Broken down to a bare minimum the query was sometimes executed using non-existing values for a particular bind variable, but other times these values were existing and very popular. There were two suitable candidate indexes and one of them appeared to the optimizer more attractive in case of the "non-existing" value case.

Nested Loop Join Physical I/O Optimizations

Having done my mini-series on Nested Loop join logical I/O optimizations a while ago I unfortunately never managed to publish anything regarding the Nested Loop join physical I/O optimizations, which are certainly much more relevant to real-life performance.Therefore the main purpose of this blog post is to point you to Nikolay Savvinov's (whose blog I can recommend in general) great mini-series covering various aspects of these optimizations:Part 1Part 2Part 3SummaryOne point that - at least to me - isn't entirely clear when reading Nikolay's series is which specific plan shape he refers to, in particul

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 2

This is the second part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time instead of burning CPU using a trivial PL/SQL loop (see part 1) the test harness executes a SQL statement that performs logical I/O only, so no physical I/O involved.

In order to achieve that a variation of Jonathan Lewis' good old "kill_cpu" script got executed. In principle each thread performed the following:

define tabname = &1

define thread_id = &1;