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performance

Pragma UDF – Speeding Up your PL/SQL Functions Called From SQL

A new feature for PL/SQL was introduced in V12, pragma UDF. UDF stands for User Defined Functions. It can speed up any SQL you have that uses PL/SQL functions you created yourself.

{please see this second post on some limitations of pragma UDF in respect of IN & RETURN data types and parameter defaults}.

We can create our own functions in PL/SQL and they can be called from both PL/SQL and SQL. This has been possible since V7.3 and is used extensively by some sites to extend the capabilities of the database and encapsulate business logic.

Where do my trace files go? V$DIAG_INFO

Where do oracle trace files go? I don’t know why this piece of info will not stick in my head, I seem to have to look it up 3 or 4 times a year.

If only I had an easy way to find out. There is a very easy way to find out – and that piece of info won’t stay in my head either. So this really is a blog post just for stupid, forgetful me.

V$DIAG_INFO has been available since oracle V11. All the trace files go into the Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) by default.

Little things worth knowing: automatic generation of extended statistics in 12c

When you are migrating to Oracle 12c I hope you might this post useful. I came across this feature when researching what’s new with Oracle 12c (and yes I still find lots of new ones I haven’t noticed before). This one is a bit hidden away in section 2.2.4.3 Automatic Column Group Detection of the 12c New Features Guide. And it’s a lot more complex than I first thought! In this first post I’ll try and show the generation of extended statistics in 12c. I am planning on another post to explain how the rest of the adaptive optimisations that are new with 12c fit into the picture.

What is the motivation?

PL/SQL Functions

Assuming everything else has been tuned to perfection, what’s the best you can do while calling PL/SQL functions from SQL ? Here’s a little code to create a table with some data, and a function that we can use to start an investigation:

How the log writer and foreground processes work together on commit.

(warning: this is a rather detailed technical post on the internal working of the Oracle database’s commit interactions between the committing foreground processes and the log writer)

After the Trivadis Performance days I was chatting to Jonathan Lewis. I presented my Profiling the log writer and database writer presentation, in which I state the foreground (user/server) process looks at the commit SCN in order to determine if its logbuffer contents are written to disk by the logwriter(s). Jonathan suggested looking deeper into this matter, because looking at the commit SCN might not the way it truly works.

Result Cache 2

Following on from my earlier posting of problems with temporary table and the PL/SQL result cache (a combination which the manuals warn you against) here’s another problem – again, to a large degree, self-inflicted.

Imagine you have a complex report involving a large number of financial transactions with a need to include calculations about current exchange rates. Unfortunately the rules about calculating the appropriate exchange rate for any transaction are complex and you find you have a choice between adding 6 tables with outer joins and a couple of aggregate (max) subqueries to the base query or calling a PL/SQL function to calculate the exchange rate for each row. I’m going to create an extremely simplified model of this requirement:

Result Cache

Yesterday I thought I’d spend half an hour before breakfast creating a little demonstration of a feature; some time about midnight I felt it was time to stop because I’d spent enough time chasing around a couple of bugs that produced wrong results in a variety of ways. Today’s short post is just little warning: be VERY careful what you do with the PL/SQL result cache – if you use the results of database queries in the cache you may end up with inconsistent results in your application. Here’s one very simple example of what can go wrong, starting with a little script:

The Fundamental Challenge of Computer System Performance

The fundamental challenge of computer system performance is for your system to have enough power to handle the work you ask it to do. It sounds really simple, but helping people meet this challenge has been the point of my whole career. It has kept me busy for 26 years, and there’s no end in sight.

Capacity and Workload

Our challenge is the relationship between a computer’s capacity and its workload. I think of capacity as an empty box representing a machine’s ability to do work over time. Workload is the work your computer does, in the form of programs that it runs for you, executed over time. Workload is the content that can fill the capacity box.

Friday Philosophy – On “Being the Expert”

Working as a recognised expert at something is a little…strange, I find.

I had an assignment this week to go visit a client, have a look at a performance issue and find out the root cause. I was also to at least come up with suggested resolutions with the ideal aim of giving them a proven fix they could implement. All to be done in two to three days. This is pretty standard fayre when you are putting yourself forward as some sort of expert in something. And it is not always an easy thing to do – for more reasons than you might expect.

[Oracle] Insights into SQL hints - Embedded global and local hints and how to use them

Introduction

The idea for this blog post started a few weeks ago when i had to troubleshoot some Oracle database / SQL performance issues at client site. The SQL itself included several views and so placing hints (for testing purpose) into the views was not possible, especially as the views were used widely and not only by the SQL with the performance issue. In consequence this blog post is about the difference between embedded global and local hints and how to use them.