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Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

Seattle PostgreSQL Meetup This Thursday: New Location

I’m looking forward to the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this Thursday (June 20, 2019) at 5:30pm! We’re going to get an early sneak peek at what’s coming later this year in PostgreSQL’s next major release. The current velocity of development in this open source community is staggering and this is an exciting and valuable opportunity to keep up with where PostgreSQL is going next.

One thing that’s a bit unusual about this meetup is the new location and late timing of the announcement. I think it’s worth a quick blog post to mention the location: for some people this new location might be a little more accessible than the normal spot (over at the Fred Hutch).

PostgreSQL: measuring query activity(WAL size generated, shared buffer reads, filesystem reads,…)

PostgreSQL: measuring query activity (WAL size generated, shared buffer reads, filesystem reads,…)

When I want to know if my application scales, I need to understand the work done by my queries. No need to run a huge amount of data from many concurrent threads. If I can get the relevant statistics behind a single unit-test, then I can infer how it will scale. For example, reading millions of pages to fetch a few rows will cause shared buffer contention. Or generating dozens of megabytes of WAL for a small update will wait on disk, and penalize the backup RTO, or the replication gap.

I’ll show some examples. From pgsql I’ll collect the statistics (which are cumulative from the start if the instance) before:

select *,pg_current_wal_lsn() from pg_stat_database where datname=current_database() \gset

and calculate the difference to show the delta:

Did you forget to allocate Huge Pages on your PostgreSQL server?

This short post is for those who answered ‘keep the default’ in the following. Because the default (which is no huge page allocated) is not good for a database.

PostgreSQL and Jupyter notebook

Here is a little test of Jupyter Notebook to access a PostgreSQL database with very simple installation, thanks to Anaconda. I did it on Windows 10 but the same simplicity is on Linux and Mac.

Anaconda

I’ll use Anaconda to install the required components

zHeap: PostgreSQL with UNDO

I’m running on an Oracle Cloud Linux 7.6 VM provisioned as a sandbox so I don’t care about where it installs. For a better installation procedure, just look at Daniel Westermann script in:

Some more zheap testing - Blog dbi services

The zHeap storage engine (in development) is provided by EnterpriseDB:

EnterpriseDB/zheap

I’ll also use pg_active_session_history, the ASH (Active Session History) approach for PostgreSQL, thanks to Bertrand Drouvot

pgsentinel/pgsentinel

In order to finish with the references, I’m running this on an Oracle Cloud compute instance (but you can run it anywhere).

Cloud Computing VM Instances - Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe