Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

Programming

Friday Philosophy – If Only I Was As Good a Programmer As I Thought I Was Aged 22

I saw a tweet that made me smile a few days ago:

programmer quote

Like many of you, I started out my working life in IT as a computer programmer. Like some of you, I still am a computer programmer from time to time. I don’t think I’ve had a year of my working life when I did not do either some application development programming or some database infrastructure programming. I am constantly writing small (or not so small) SQL or PL/SQL programs to do what I do in Oracle.

Friday Philosophy – My Introduction To Programming Way Back When

One fortunate thing about me is my age. Or rather, how old I was in the 1980’s. I was at school in the 80’s, I did my ‘O’ Levels (taken at age 16) in 1984. One of my ‘O’ levels was in Computer Studies. This was before Windows and Excel and Word and all that office software, before the internet was in existence (TCP/IP was only standardized in 1982!) and phones were all tethered to the wall with a cable. What were we taught in Computer Studies? Programming. That and a bit about hardware, but mostly it was programming.

This beast had  about 48k of memory and hi-res 320*192 pixels

This beast had about 48k of memory and hi-res 320*192 pixels

Teach Your Children Well

Today’s the first day of school in my city, and the plethora of “OMG 1st day of school!” posts of Facebook and my own kids heading back in to slog through another year of fundamentals got me thinking about education. My own kids (12/daughter and 10/son) came home and went swimming since it was about 104 degrees today…the hottest day of the summer, as it were.

DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO for Instrumentation

I just wanted to put up a post about DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO. This is a fantastic little built-in PL/SQL package that Oracle has provided since Oracle 8 to allow you to instrument your code. i.e record what it is doing. I’m a big fan of DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO and have used it several times to help identify where in an application time is being spent and how that pattern of time has altered.

Some PL/SQL developers use it and some don’t. It seems to me that it’s use comes down to where you work, as most PL/SQL developers are aware of it – but not everyone uses it (a friend of mine made the comment recently that “all good PL/SQL developers use it“. I can understand his point but don’t 100% agree).