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RDBMS (vs. NoSQL) scales the algorithm before the hardware

By Franck Pachot

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In The myth of NoSQL (vs. RDBMS) “joins dont scale” I explained that joins actually scale very well with an O(logN) on the input tables size, thanks to B*Tree index access, and can even be bounded by hash partitioning with local index, like in DynamoDB single-table design. Jonathan Lewis added a comment that, given the name of the tables (USERS and ORDERS). we should expect an increasing number of rows returned by the join.

In this post I’ll focus on this: how does it scale when index lookup has to read more and more rows. I’ll still use DynamoDB for the NoSQL example, and this time I’ll do the same in Oracle for the RDBMS example.

Video : SQLcl : Format Query Results

In today’s video we demonstrate how to format query results in SQLcl using query comments and the SQLFORMAT setting.

For those of you that prefer to read, the video is based on this article.

The star of today’s video is Charles Wilson, who I got chatting with at the OTN lounge at a previous OpenWorld. </p />
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Video : Flashback Version Query

Today’s video gives a quick run through of flashback version query.

If you prefer to read articles, rather than watch videos, you might be interested in these.

Video : Flashback Query

Today’s video is a quick demo of flashback query.

If you prefer to read articles, rather than watch videos, you might be interested in these articles.

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)

Largest Tables Including Indexes and LOBs

Just a quick code snippit. I do a lot of data pumps to move schemas between different databases; for example taking a copy of a schema to an internal database to try to reproduce a problem. Some of these schemas have some very large tables. The large tables aren’t always needed to research a particular problem.

Here’s a quick bit of SQL to list the 20 largest tables by total size – including space used by indexes and LOBs. A quick search on google didn’t reveal anything similar so I just wrote something up myself. I’m pretty sure this is somewhat efficient; if there’s a better way to do it then let me know! I’m posting here so I can reference it in the future. :)