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Please be patient!

angry-1300616_640It’s extremely nice to have a big audience. It’s very flattering that people care enough about what I say to be bothered to read it. The problem with having a large audience is people can get a very demanding at times. </p />
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Nothing you learn is ever wasted!

glasses-272399_1280-smallAbout 18 months ago I went on a couple of load balancer training courses at F5. It was over a year later that we actually got the things wired in and ready to go. I played with them for a couple of days, then nothing for another six months. I’ve only put one service live on them so far, but we are about to start the full rollout now. :)

Always write everything down!

notes-514998_640In my second job we worked on projects in small teams, maybe 2-3 people. My boss at the time, the team leader, was a lady called Andrea. She wrote everything down. I mean everything! I was still pretty new to the business world and rather naive, so I tended to rely on my memory a lot. Needless to say, she saved our bacon on numerous occasions. That was a very good lesson!

Problem Solving (Breaking Things Down)

direction-1033278_640Some people are great at problem solving, others not so much. The people I meet that are good at problem solving always have one very important skill, the ability to break stuff down into its constituent parts. With practice, it can seem like they are making massive leaps of faith, but that is based on their experience. That experience came from breaking problems down and dealing with the little stuff. Here are some examples, including some you may not consider as classic problem solving, but illustrate the point.

Annoying your user base never pays off!

lego-face-angryThis post is heavily inspired by the events of #RIPTwitter and the recent Fine Brothers fiasco, but it could apply to just about any company, product or person. When I say user base, I could easily mean customers or fan base.

(Not So) Internal Dialogue

internal-dialogueWhen I wrote about rehearsals in my public speaking tips series, I mentioned talking through small sections of the presentations as a means for rehearsals. I do this a lot! I live on my own, so this is not an internal dialogue. I say this stuff out loud.

This morning I was talking through some ideas as I left the house and cleared the ice off the car. I continued during the journey to work, including when I got out of the car to get a coffee from the Costa Express at the garage. Even as I was unlocking the office door.

YouTube : 6 Months and 1000 Subscribers!

That’s right, it’s been a touch over 6 months and my YouTube channel has just hit the 1000 subscriber mark. :)

This YouTube experience has been quite odd. My plan was to try and upload a video every weekday for the first 2 months, and I came pretty close to hitting that target. Once I had got a bit of content on the channel, I was inevitably going to kick back a little. After all, there is the website, the blog, life and that annoyance they call work to consider. I think a realistic target is to aim for is 1-2 videos a week.

Happy New Year 2016!

New-Year-Eve-2016Happy New Year to everyone! Yes, even you!

I’m not big on new years resolutions, since I always end up breaking them on the first visit to the 24 hour Tesco store down the street! So in a similar vein to a post I wrote in 2012, here is my mission statement for the year!

Content

Twitter : Is it a valuable community contribution? (Follow Up)

There was some pretty interesting feedback on yesterday’s post, so I thought I would mention it in a follow up post, so it doesn’t get lost in the wasteland of blog comments. :)

Remember, I wasn’t saying certain types of tweets were necessarily good or bad. I was talking about how *I* rate them as far as content production and how they *might* be rated by an evangelism program…

Owning Your Content

Another thing that came out of my conversation with Zahid Anwar at OOW15, was about owning your content.

If your intention is to make a name for yourself in the community, it’s important you think about your “brand”. Most of us old-timers didn’t have to worry about this, and sometimes get a bit snooty about the idea of it, but we started early, so it was relatively easy to get noticed. For new people on the scene, it’s a much harder proposition.

It’s possible to write content on sites like Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn, but I’m not sure that’s the best way to promote “your brand”. In some communities it might be the perfect solution, but in others I think you are in danger of becoming a faceless contributor to their brand.