Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 32 guests online.

Recent comments

Redundant Indexes

Identifying Redundant Indexes in PeopleSoft

This is the first of a two-part series that discusses how to identify and remove redundant indexes from a PeopleSoft system.
I recently wrote a series of articles on my Oracle blog about identifying redundant indexes on an Oracle database. The same approach can be taken with PeopleSoft, but using the metadata in the PeopleTools tables rather than the database catalogue.
(This means you could take a similar approach for PeopleSoft on databases other than Oracle, but I can't say anything about the behaviour of other optimizers) 
The following query returns a report of superset and redundant subset indexes in a PeopleSoft system. It can be downloaded as a script from my website (psredundant.sql).

Removing Unnecessary Indexes: 3.Cost of Maintaining Indexes

This is the third post in a series about unnecessary indexes and some of the challenges that they present.
In this post I want to look at how to quantify the overhead of index maintenance, and estimate the benefit of removing redundant indexes.
Let’s conduct an experiment. I will set up the same table and indexes as in the previous posts in this series, but this time I will put them into the RECYCLE buffer pool, to which I have allocated the minimum possible 4M of memory, and I will allocate 25% free space to the indexes. The idea is not to benefit from the buffer cache, but suffer the pain of the physical I/O.

Removing Unnecessary Indexes: 2. Identifying Redundant Indexes

This is the second post in a series about unnecessary indexes and some of the challenges that they present.

Removing Unnecessary Indexes: 1. The Need for Extended Statistics

This is the first post in a series about unnecessary indexes and some of the challenges that they present 

I have always noted that it is remarkably easy to add indexes to systems, especially OLTP systems. However, removing them is generally more difficult.
The reward for removing an unused, or at least an unnecessary, index is that you no longer need to maintain it during DML operations, thus reducing I/O and not loading index blocks into the buffer cache. However, the risk is that performance will degrade somewhere, because an execution plan changes.