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Compressing sqlplus output using a pipe

Recently I am involved in a project which requires a lot of data to be extracted from Oracle. The size of the data was so huge that the filesystems filled up. Compressing the output (using tar j (bzip2) or z (gzip)) is an obvious solution, but this can only be done after the files are created. This is why I proposed compressing the output without ever existing in uncompressed form.

This solution works with a so called ‘named pipe’, which is something for which I know for sure it can be done on Linux and unix. A named pipe has the ability to let two processes transfer data between each other. This solution will look familiar to “older” Oracle DBA’s: this was how exports where compressed from the “original” export utility (exp).

I’ve created a small script which calls sqlplus embedded in it, and executes sqlplus commands using a “here command”:

Recovery Catalog Views

I’ve recently run into an issue where the recovery catalog views (RC_xxx) in an 11.1.0.7 catalog may contain inaccurate information. We have a client with multiple databases all of which are backed up using RMAN. Rather than reading the logfile of each and every backup, each and every day I wrote a small script to [...]

Shell Tricks

DBAs from time to time must write shell scripts. If your environment is strictly Windows based, this article may hold little interest for you.

Many DBAs however rely on shell scripting to manage databases. Even if you use OEM for many tasks, you likely use shell scripts to manage some aspects of DBA work.

Lately I have been writing a number of scripts to manage database statistics - gathering, deleting, and importing exporting both to and from statistics tables exp files.

Years ago I started using the shell builtin getopts to gather arguments from the command line. A typical use might look like the following:

while getopts d:u:s:T:t:n: arg
do
case $arg in