Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 25 guests online.

Recent comments

SQL

Make SQL Great Again! (SQL is Huuuuuge) Part III Are relational database management systems web scale?

Lightly-edited partial transcript of a panel discussion titled “Making SQL Great Again (SQL is Huuuuuge)” at YesSQL Summit 2016 organized by the Northern California Oracle Users Group (NoCOUG) at Oracle Corporation’s headquarters in Redwood City, California. NoCOUG is the longest-running and most-active Oracle users group in the world. An individual membership only costs $95 and entitles the member to free admission to the four consecutive quarterly NoCOUG conferences (one-day events) that follow the membership’s start date, the winter conference being the first day of YesSQL Summit. You can become a member at http://nocoug.org/join.html.

The panelists were Andrew (Andy) Mendelsohn (Executive Vice-President, Database Server Technologies, Oracle), Graham Wood (Architect, Oracle), Bryn Llewellyn (Distinguished Product Manager, Oracle), Hermann Baer (Senior Director, Product Manager, Oracle), Steven Feuerstein (Architect, Oracle).

Make SQL Great Again! (SQL is Huuuuuge) Part II Why are we even having this discussion?

Lightly-edited partial transcript of a panel discussion titled “Making SQL Great Again (SQL is Huuuuuge)” at YesSQL Summit 2016 organized by the Northern California Oracle Users Group (NoCOUG) at Oracle Corporation’s headquarters in Redwood City, California. NoCOUG is the longest-running and most-active Oracle users group in the world. An individual membership only costs $95 and entitles the member to free admission to the four consecutive quarterly NoCOUG conferences (one-day events) that follow the membership’s start date, the winter conference being the first day of YesSQL Summit. You can become a member at http://nocoug.org/join.html.

The panelists were Andrew (Andy) Mendelsohn (Executive Vice-President, Database Server Technologies, Oracle), Graham Wood (Architect, Oracle), Bryn Llewellyn (Distinguished Product Manager, Oracle), Hermann Baer (Senior Director, Product Manager, Oracle), Steven Feuerstein (Architect, Oracle).

Make SQL Great Again! (SQL is Huuuuuge) Part I Introductions

Lightly-edited partial transcript of a panel discussion titled “Making SQL Great Again (SQL is Huuuuuge)” at YesSQL Summit 2016 organized by the Northern California Oracle Users Group (NoCOUG) at Oracle Corporation’s headquarters in Redwood City, California. NoCOUG is the longest-running and most-active Oracle users group in the world. An individual membership only costs $95 and entitles the member to free admission to the four consecutive quarterly NoCOUG conferences (one-day events) that follow the membership’s start date, the winter conference being the first day of YesSQL Summit. You can become a member at http://nocoug.org/join.html.

The panelists were Andrew (Andy) Mendelsohn (Executive Vice-President, Database Server Technologies, Oracle), Graham Wood (Architect, Oracle), Bryn Llewellyn (Distinguished Product Manager, Oracle), Hermann Baer (Senior Director, Product Manager, Oracle), Steven Feuerstein (Architect, Oracle).

ORA_ROWSCN – When Was My Record Commited

I was going to do a follow-up post to my post on USERENV(‘COMMITSCN’) just to describe the slightly better known but still overlooked (and possibly more useful) ORA_ROWSCN – but I don’t need to!

As Neil Chandler has done this excellent post on it

Go and look at that post, it has all the information and detail you were actually looking for.

However, for any of you search-engine-seekers who can’t face the pain of following a link {it’s such a hard life for the modern knowledge-by-mouse-click generation}, here are the bare bones:

Getting Your Transaction SCN – USERENV(COMMITSCN)

A few days ago I was introduced (or re-introduced) to USERENV(‘COMMITSCN’) by Jonathan Lewis. This is an internal function that allows limited access to the SCN of your transaction.

I was trying to find a way to get the actual commit SCN easily as it struck me that Oracle would have it to hand somewhere and it would be unique to the change and generated very efficiently. I could not find anything to do it so I asked Jonathan and he pointed me straight to this post he did about it a while back. What a nice chap. However, the post is from 1999 (last CENTURY!) so I thought I should just check it out first…

The Twelve Days of SQLT: Day Four: Nobody Did It

Previous installment: Day Three: Just a Mess Without a Clue

I know a funny little man,
As quiet as a mouse,
Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house!
There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree
That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.

—Unknown author

The Twelve Days of SQLT: Day Three: Just a Mess Without a Clue

P.O.I.S.E.D. is an acronym for a six-step performance tuning method; it stands for Problem, Observation, Interpretation, Solution, Execution, and Documentation. Every problem-solving exercise has these six stages, whether the exercise takes six minutes or six weeks.(read more)

The Twelve Days of SQLT: Day Two: Miles To Go Before We Sleep

SQLT adoption has been limited even though it is the best tool for investigating SQL performance: It is only available as a download from Oracle Support. It creates tables and PL/SQL procedures in the database. It does not support Statspack, only AWR. (read more)

The Twelve Days of SQLT: Day One: Do What You Do Do Well

In his fifteen years with Oracle Support, Carlos Sierra created and perfected a tool called SQLTXPLAIN (SQL Tuning and Explain Plan; SQLT for short) for SQL performance investigations. SQLT collects all the information that could possibly be required to investigate SQL performance including environment information, execution plan history, statistics history (system statistics, table statistics, index statistics), and object definitions.(read more)

Pragma UDF – Some Current Limitations

There are currently some limitations to when pragma UDF will speed up your calls to PL/SQL functions from SQL.

In my post introducing the new pragma UDF feature of Oracle 12c I explained how it can be used to reduce the impact of context switching when you call a PL/SQL function from SQL.

In my example I showed how running a SQL-only SELECT statement that formatted a name for display over 100,000 records took 0.03 seconds went up to 0.33 seconds when the formatting SQL was put in a user defined PL/SQL function. This impact on performance is a shame as it is so beneficial to encapsulate business logic in one single place with PL/SQL. Stating that the PL/SQL function is a user defined one with the pragma UDF option reduced the run time to 0.08 seconds – which is removing most of the context switching overhead. Check out the prior post for full details.