Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

storage

Diagnosing ASMlib

To use ASMlib or not to use ASMlib? That is the question. Or at least, that is a question that frequently crops up when I’m on consulting engagements with customers. I have personally changed my mind a couple of times on this exact question, and I’m currently sat with one leg on either side of … Continue reading "Diagnosing ASMlib"

System Architecture Series: Introduction to the Series and Licensing

This blog post is an introduction to a few posts that can be grouped together under the banner of 'System Architecture'. Specifically, I'm referring here to Oracle Database System Architecture, not system architecture in general nor 'Oracle architecture' in general, which is an ever-growing beast. In this series of posts, I will take at look […]

System Architecture Series: Introduction to the Series and Licensing

This blog post is an introduction to a few posts that can be grouped together under the banner of 'System Architecture'. Specifically, I'm referring here to Oracle Database System Architecture, not system architecture in general nor 'Oracle architecture' in general, which is an ever-growing beast. In this series of posts, I will take at look […]

The effect of ASM redundancy/parity on read/write IOPS – SLOB test case! for Exadata and non-Exa environments

Last week I had a lengthy post at oracle-l that tackles Calibrate IO, Short Stroking, Stripe size, UEK kernel, and ASM redundancy effect on IOPS Exadata which you can read here
followed by interesting exchange of tweets with Kevin Closson here (see 06/21-22 tweets) which I was replying in between games at UnderwaterHockey US Nationals 2012 which we won the championship for the B division </p />
</p></div>

    	  	<div class=

Storage Replication for Oracle Database and Licensing

While doing my high availability deep dive at Collaborate 12 few weeks ago, I stated that storage replication qualifies for the cold failover licensing rules (see slide #128). During collaborate I spoke to one person at Oracle who definitely knows the rules. Simon Haslam also reached out to me by email pointing out that things...

Udev Rules OK

Dear Linux Hackers, Have we not finished changing the 'best' way to have persistent naming and security attributes for disk devices? Seriously, just when we thought it was great to put the "uid", "gid" and "mode" specifications for disk devices into /etc/multipath.conf, then it gets once again deprecated in favour of udev. This push and […]

Udev Rules OK

Dear Linux Hackers, Have we not finished changing the 'best' way to have persistent naming and security attributes for disk devices? Seriously, just when we thought it was great to put the "uid", "gid" and "mode" specifications for disk devices into /etc/multipath.conf, then it gets once again deprecated in favour of udev. This push and […]

Testing Transport Latency

(Updated 04/04/12 to fix bug with large raw disk partitions) I need your help! One of the things that I have struggled to get data for in my storage research is the latency of the interface between server and storage device. It's easy to get numbers for the actual storage device, but the latency numbers […]

Testing Transport Latency

(Updated 04/04/12 to fix bug with large raw disk partitions) I need your help! One of the things that I have struggled to get data for in my storage research is the latency of the interface between server and storage device. It's easy to get numbers for the actual storage device, but the latency numbers […]

Tuning is in the eye of the beholder… Memory is memory right?

It is human nature to draw from experiences to make sense of our surroundings.  This holds true in life and performance tuning.   A veteran systems administrator will typically tune a system different from an Oracle DBA.  This is fine, but often what is obvious to one, is not to the other.  It is sometimes necessary to take a step back to tune from another perspective.

I recently have ran across a few cases where a customer was tuning “Sorts” in the database by adding memory. Regardless of your prospective, every one knows memory is faster than disk; and the goal of any good tuner is to use as much in memory as possible.   So, when it was noticed by the systems administrator that the “TEMP” disks for Oracle were doing a tremendous amount of IO,  the answer was obvious right?