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subquery factoring

CTEs and Updates

An important target of trouble-shooting, particularly when addressing performance problems, is to minimise the time and effort you have to spend to get a “good enough” result. A recent question on the OTN database forum struck me as a good demonstration of following this strategy; the problem featured a correlated update that had to access a view 84 times to update a small table; but the view was a complex view (apparently non-mergeable) and the update took several hours to complete even though the view, when instantiated, held only 63 rows.

The OP told us that the query “select * from view” took seven minutes to return those 63 rows, and wanted to know if we could find a nice way to perform the update in (approximately) that seven minutes, rather than using the correlated update approach that seemed to take something in the ballpark of 7 minutes per row updated.

Existence

A recent question on the OTN Database Forum asked:

I need to check if at least one record present in table before processing rest of the statements in my PL/SQL procedure. Is there an efficient way to achieve that considering that the table is having huge number of records like 10K.

I don’t think many readers of the forum would consider 10K to be a huge number of records; nevertheless it is a question that could reasonably be asked, and should prompt a little discssion.

First question to ask, of course is: how often do you do this and how important is it to be as efficient as possible. We don’t want to waste a couple of days of coding and testing to save five seconds every 24 hours. Some context is needed before charging into high-tech geek solution mode.

Subquery Factoring (10)

What prompted me to write my previous note about subquerying was an upgrade to 12c, and a check that a few critical queries would not do something nasty on the upgrade. As ever it’s always interesting how many little oddities you can discover while looking closely as some little detail of how the optimizer works. Here’s an oddity that came up in the course of my playing around investigation in 12.1.0.2 – first some sample data:

Subquery Factoring (9)

Several years go (eight to be precise) I wrote a note suggesting that Oracle will not materialize a factored subquery unless it is used at least twice in the main query. I based this conclusion on a logical argument about the cost of creating and using a factored subquery and, at the time, I left it at that. A couple of years ago I came across an example where even with two uses of a factored subquery Oracle still didn’t materialize even though the cost of doing so would reduce the cost of the query – but I never got around to writing up the example, so here it is:

Functions & Subqueries

I think the “mini-series” is a really nice blogging concept – it can pull together a number of short articles to offer a much better learning experience for the reader than they could get from the random collection of sound-bites that so often typifies an internet search; so here’s my recommendation for this week’s mini-series: a set of articles by Sayan Malakshinov a couple of years ago comparing the behaviour of Deterministic Functions and Scalar Subquery Caching.

http://orasql.org/2013/02/10/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-1/

http://orasql.org/2013/02/11/deterministic-function-vs-scalar-subquery-caching-part-2/

Recursive subquery factoring

This is possibly my longest title to date – I try to keep them short enough to fit the right hand column of the blog without wrapping – but I couldn’t think of a good way to shorten it (Personally I prefer to use the expression CTE – common table expression – over “factored subquery” or “subquery factoring” or “with subquery”, and that would have achieved my goal, but might not have meant anything to most people.)

If you haven’t come across them before, recursive CTEs appeared in 11.2, are in the ANSI standard, and are (probably) viewed by Oracle as the strategic replacement for “connect by” queries. Here’s a simple (and silly) example:

12c Subquery Factoring

From time to time I’ve posted a reminder that subquery factoring (“with subquery”) can give you changes in execution plans even if the subquery that you’ve taken out of line is written back inline by Oracle rather than being materialized. This can still happen in 12c – here’s a sample query in the two forms with the result sets and execution plans.  First, the “factored” version:

12c subquery factoring

I’ve written a few notes about anomalies in subquery factoring (with subquery) in the past, principally making a fuss about the fact that moving an inline view into a “with subquery” can cause a plan to change even when the internal code moves the subquery back in line. With the arrival of 12c one of my first sets of tests was to rerun all the examples to see how many of them had been addressed. I hadn’t written about as many examples as I had thought, and some of them had been fixed before 12c, but here are few references to a couple of outstanding items that I thought worth a mention:

Report Generators And Query Transformations

Usually the Cost-Based Optimizer arrives at a reasonable execution plan if it gets the estimates regarding cardinality and data scattering / clustering right (if you want to learn more about that why not watch my Webinar available at "AllThingsOracle.com"?).

Here is an example I've recently come across where this wasn't case - the optimizer obviously preferred plans with a significantly higher cost.

The setup to reproduce the issue is simple:

Subquery Factoring

I have a small collection of postings where I’ve described anomalies or limitations in subquery factoring (the “with subquery”, or Common Table Expression (CTE) to give it the official ANSI name). Here’s another example of Oracle’s code not behaving consistently. You may recognise the basic query from yesterday’s example of logical tuning – so I won’t reprint the code to generate the data sets. This examples in this note were created on 11.2.0.2 – we start with a simple query and its execution plan: