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systemtap

Oracle 12.2 wait event ‘PGA memory operation’

When sifting through a sql_trace file from Oracle version 12.2, I noticed a new wait event: ‘PGA memory operation’:

WAIT #0x7ff225353470: nam='PGA memory operation' ela= 16 p1=131072 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=484 tim=15648003957

The current documentation has no description for it. Let’s see what V$EVENT_NAME says:

SQL> select event#, name, parameter1, parameter2, parameter3, wait_class 
  2  from v$event_name where name = 'PGA memory operation';

EVENT# NAME                                  PARAMETER1 PARAMETER2 PARAMETER3 WAIT_CLASS
------ ------------------------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------------
   524 PGA memory operation                                                   Other

Well, that doesn’t help…

PL/SQL context switch, part 2

This is the second blogpost on using PL/SQL inside SQL. If you landed on this page and have not read the first part, click this link and read that first. I gotten some reactions on the first article, of which one was: how does this look like with ‘pragma udf’ in the function?

Pragma udf is a way to speed up using PL/SQL functions in (user defined function), starting from version 12. If you want to know more about the use of pragma udf, and when it does help, and when it doesn’t, please google for it.

create or replace function add_one( value number ) return number is
        pragma udf;
        l_value number(10):= value;
begin
        return l_value+1;
end;
/

select sum(add_one(id)) from t2;

As you can see, really the only thing you have to do is add ‘pragma udf’ in the declaration section of PL/SQL.

PL/SQL context switch

Whenever you use PL/SQL in SQL statements, the Oracle engine needs to switch from doing SQL to doing PL/SQL, and switch back after it is done. Generally, this is called a “context switch”. This is an example of that:

-- A function that uses PL/SQL 
create or replace function add_one( value number ) return number is
        l_value number(10):= value;
begin
        return l_value+1;
end;
/
-- A SQL statement that uses the PL/SQL function
select sum(add_one(id)) from t2;

Of course the functionality of the function is superfluous, it can easily be done in ‘pure’ SQL with ‘select sum(id+1) from t2’. But that is not the point.
Also, I added a sum() function, for the sake of preventing output to screen per row.

Introducing stapflame, extended stack profiling using systemtap, perf and flame graphs

There’s been a lot of work in the area of profiling. One of the things I have recently fallen in love with is Brendan Gregg’s flamegraphs. I work mainly on Linux, which means I use perf for generating stack traces. Luca Canali put a lot of effort in generating extended stack profiling methods, including kernel (only) stack traces and CPU state, reading the wait interface via direct SGA reading and kernel stack traces and getting userspace stack traces using libunwind and ptrace plus kernel stack and CPU state. I was inspired by the last method, but wanted more information, like process CPU state including runqueue time.

How long does a logical IO take?

This is a question that I played with for a long time. There have been statements on logical IO performance (“Logical IO is x times faster than Physical IO”), but nobody could answer the question what the actual logical IO time is. Of course you can see part of it in the system and session statistics (v$sysstat/v$sesstat), statistic name “session logical reads”. However, if you divide the number of logical reads by the total time a query took, the logical IO time is too high, because then it assumed all the time the query took was spend on doing logical IO, which obviously is not the case, because there is time spend on parsing, maybe physical IO, etc. Also, when doing that, you calculate an average. Averages are known to hide actual behaviour.

Systemtap revisited

Some time back, I investigated the options to do profiling of processes in Linux. One of the things I investigated was systemtap. After careful investigation I came to the conclusion that systemtap was not really useful for my investigations, because it only worked in kernelspace, only very limited in userspace. The limitation of working in userspace was that you had to define your own markers in the source code of the program you wanted to profile with systemtap and compile that. Since my investigations are mostly around Oracle products, which are closed source, this doesn’t help me at all.