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Why you cannot use #Oracle’s SQL Developer to connect to #Exasol

Many of our customers are using Oracle together with SQL Developer, so this question comes up regularly: Can we use SQL Developer also for Exasol?

Short answer is: Unfortunately not.

I tried myself to make that work with no success. Then I found this on Stackoverflow:

Jeff Smith: “No, that’s not supported. SQL Developer’s 3rd party JDBC connectivity is provided for one use case – migrations to Oracle Database.
There’s no support on that for Exasol DB, so there’s no connectivity support provided.
If you want a generic jdbc db client, that’s not Oracle SQL Developer.” [Highlighted by me]

Free online courses to learn about #Exasol

Why should you bother? Because Exasol is the fastest analytical database in the world, outperforming any competitor. Therefore, expertise about Exasol might soon be very valuable also in your company.
Free training helps us to spread the knowledge in a scalable way, empowering customers across the globe to get the best out of Exasol and supporting our rapid growth.

You can register here. The free online courses are branded as “Exacademy”:

Automatic Indexes in #Exasol

An Exasol database will automatically create, maintain and drop indexes, following the core idea to deliver great performance without requiring much administrative efforts. Like our tables, our indexes are always compressed and you don’t need to configure anything for that.

Joins between two or more tables are processed like this in Exasol: One table is full scanned (this is called the root table) and the other tables are joined using an index on their join columns.

If these indexes on the join columns are not already existing, they are automatically created during the join operation. Taking two tables t1 and t2 as an example, and a statement like

Comparison between #Oracle and #Exasol

After having worked with both databases for quite some time, this is what I consider to be the key differences between Oracle and Exasol. Of course the two have much in common: Both are relational databases with a transaction management system that supports the ACID model and both follow the ANSI SQL standard – both with some enhancements. Coming from Oracle as I do, much in Exasol looks quite familiar. But let’s focus on the differences:

Strengths

Oracle is leading technology for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP). If you have a high data volume with many users doing concurrent changes, this is where Oracle shines particularly.

Exasol is leading technology for analytical workloads. If you want to do real-time ad hoc reporting on high data volume, this is where Exasol shines particularly.

Recover dropped tables with Virtual Access Restore in #Exasol

The technique to recover only certain objects from an ordinary backup is called Virtual Access Restore. Means you create a database from backup that contains only the minimum elements needed to access the objects you request. This database is then removed afterwards.

Let’s see an example. This is my initial setup:

Understanding Partitioning in #Exasol

Exasol introduced Partitioning in version 6.1. This feature helps to improve the performance of statements accessing large tables. As an example, let’s take these two tables:

 

Accelerate your #BI Performance with #Exasol

Your BI users complain about slow performance of their analytical queries? Is this your Status Quo?

Account locking in an Active Data Guard environment

During the Data Guard round table of the excellent UKOUG Tech18 conference I got aware of this topic that I’d like to share with the Oracle community:

What is the locking behavior for user accounts in an environment where users may connect to the primary as well as to the standby database?

#DOAG2018 Impressions

As every year in November, the database circus moved to Nuremberg on behalf of the annual DOAG conference. As you may know, this conference has very high standards in terms of turnout and top-notch speakers and it reached them once again: It was a great event!

It started with the welcome keynote where Stefan Kinnen told us that the conference attracted over 2000 attendees and more than 400 speakers from all over the world. That should make it the largest database conference in Europe, I suppose!

Installing an #Exasol 6.1 Cluster on VirtualBox

After having installed the latest VirtualBox version, an ISO file with the latest Exasol version has to be downloaded. The machine hosting VirtualBox should have at least 16 GB RAM and 80 GB free disk space in order to run a 2+1 Cluster with 3 data nodes and one license server. I’m doing it on my Windows 10 notebook.