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Tom Kyte

Tom Kyte in Moscow – 2

On December 11th Tom Kyte performed “AskTom in Moscow” for the second time (first time was almost three years ago in February 2010). I was there and enjoyed presentations, tweeted a lot about the content and in the end I’ve won a signed copy of the Expert Oracle Database Architecture (2nd edition, in Russian)!

The start

A glass for questions. It was full in the end of the day

Mac|Life and Tom Kyte

I usually have my nose in my Kindle or iPad while traveling, but there's always the time between take-off and 10,000 feet where electronics are verboten where I need something to occupy my time. As my time filler, I will often pick up a magazine to read and on yesterday's trip home from the Hotsos Symposium in Dallas, I grabbed a Mac|Life magazine to read.

Read Consistency, "ORA-01555 snapshot too old" errors and the SCN_ASCENDING hint

Oracle uses for its read consistency model a true multi-versioning approach which allows readers to not block writers and vice-versa, writers to not block readers. Obviously this great feature allowing highly concurrent processing doesn't come for free, since somewhere the information to build multiple versions of the same data needs to be stored.

Oracle uses the so called undo information not only to rollback on-going transactions but also to re-construct old versions of blocks if required. Very simplified when reading data Oracle knows the point in time (which corresponds to an internal counter called SCN, System Change Number) that data needs to be consistent with. In the default READ COMMITTED isolation mode this point in time is defined when a statement starts to execute. You could also say at the moment a statement starts to run its result is pre-ordained. When Oracle processes a block it checks if the block is "old" enough and if it discovers that the block content is too new (has been changed by other sessions but the current access is not supposed to see this updated content according to the point-in-time assigned to the statement execution) it will start to create a copy of the block and use the information available from the corresponding undo segment to re-construct an older version of the block. Note that this process can be iterative: If after re-constructing the older version of the block it's still not sufficiently old more undo information will be used to go further back in time.

Last call for C. J. Date course

Note added 3 April 2009: When I wrote this post, we were counting down toward 2 April as the date for our preliminary go/no-go decision. That date is now behind us, and we have made the preliminary decision to Go. We are accepting further enrollments. —Cary Millsap

Thursday 2 April 2009 is our last call for enrollment in C. J. Date's course, "How to write correct SQL, and know it: a relational approach to SQL." I'm looking forward to this course more eagerly than anything I've attended in the past ten years, ...maybe twenty.

SQL and I never really got along too well. When I first joined Oracle Corporation in 1989, I was new to relational databases. I had done one hierarchical database project in college. I enjoyed the project ok, but it wasn't something I ever wanted to do again. When I joined Oracle, I didn't know much about relational technology or SQL. In my formative first couple of years at Oracle, though, I just never learned to like the SQL language. Prior to my Oracle career, I designed languages and wrote compilers for a living. From a language design standpoint, it just seemed that SQL (at least "Oracle SQL") could have become something really cool, but it didn't. For Oracle to treat an empty string as NULL, for example, is a decision which I still can't believe made it into the light of day...

I had a lot of respect over the years for the people I met who knew how to make SQL do what they wanted it to do. Dominic Delmolino was one of the first people I ever met who could make SQL do things I had no idea it could do. I'm still amazed when I see the things that Tom Kyte can do with SQL. I was never one of the SQL people.