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trace files

Trace Files

A recent blog note by Martin Berger about reading trace files in 12.2 poped up in my twitter timeline yesterday and reminded me of a script I wrote a while ago to create a simple view I could query to read the tracefile generated by the current session while the session was still connected. You either have to create the view and a public synonym through the SYS schema, or you have to use the SYS schema to grant select privileges on several dynamic performance views to the user to allow the user to create the view in the user’s schema. For my scratch database I tend to create the view in the SYS schema.

Script to be run by SYS:

Hash Optimisation-

Franck Pachot did an interesting presentation at the OBUG (Belgium user group) Tech Days showing how to use one of the O/S debug/trace tools to step through the function calls that Oracle made during different types of joins. This prompted me to ask him a question about a possible optimisation of hash joins as follows:

The hash join operation creates an in-memory hash table from the rowsource produced by its first child operation then probes the hash table with rows from the row source produced by the second child operation; but if there are no rows in the first row source then there’s no need to acquire rows from the second row source, so Oracle doesn’t call the second child operation.

RI Locks

RI = Referential Integrity: also known informally as parent/child integrity, and primary (or unique) key/foreign key checking.

I’m on a bit of a roll with things that I must have explained dozens or even hundreds of times in different environments without ever formally explaining them on my blog. Here’s a blog item I could have done with to response to  a question that came up on the OTN database forum over the weekend.

What happens in the following scenario:

Trace file size

Here’s a convenient enhancement for tracing that came up on Twitter a few days ago – first in a tweet that I retweeted, then in a question from Christian Antognini based on this bit of the 12c Oracle documentation (opens in separate tab). The question was – does it work for you ?

The new description for max_dump_file_size says that for large enough values Oracle will split the file into multiple chunks of a few megabytes, using a suffix to identify the sequence of the chunks, keeping only the first chunk and the most recent chunks. Unfortunately this doesn’t seem to be true. However, prompted by Chris’ question I ran a quick query against the full parameter list looking for parameters with the word “trace” in their name:

Migrated rows

I received an email recently describing a problem with a query which was running a full tablescan but: “almost all the waits are on ‘db file sequential read’ and the disk read is 10 times the table blocks”.  Some further information supplied was that the tablespace was using ASSM and 16KB block size; the table had 272 columns (ouch!) and the Oracle version was 11.2.0.4.

sql_trace

Here’s a convenient aid to trouble-shooting that appeared in 11g with its enhancements to setting events. It’s a feature that may help you to work out (among other things) why a given statement seems to have a highly variable performance profile. If you can find the SQL_ID for a parent cursor you can enable tracing for just that cursor whenever it executes, whoever executes it.

Wrong Index 2

A couple of days ago I wrote an article about Oracle picking the “wrong index” after an index rebuild, and I mentioned that the sample data I had generated looked a little odd because it came from a script I had been using to investigate a completely different problem. This note describes that other problem, which appeared on the Oracle-L mailing list last month.

12c First N

There have been a couple of nice posts about the “Top N” (or First N / Next N)  syntax that has appeared in 12c, here and here, for example. I particularly like the first set of examples because they include some execution plans that give you a good idea of what’s  going on under the covers. “Under the covers” is important, because if you don’t actually have a large data set to test on you might not realise what impact a “Top N” query might have on a production data set.

Cursor Sharing

Here’s a couple of extracts from a trace file after I’ve set optimizer_dynamic_sampling to level 3. I’ve run two, very similar, SQL statements that both require dynamic sampling according to the rules for the parameter – but take a look at the different ways that sampling has happened, and ask yourself what’s going on:

Statement 1 produced this sampling code:

Index Hints

In my last post I made a comment about how the optimizer will use the new format of the index hint to identify an index that is an exact match if it can, and any index that starts with the same columns (in the right order) if it can’t find an exact match. It’s fairly easy to demonstrate the behaviour in 11g by examining the 10053 (CBO) trace file generated by a simple, single table, query – in fact, this is probably a case that Doug Burns might want to cite as an example of how, sometimes, the 10053 is easy to interpret (in little patches):