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Power BI 101- Logging and Tracing, Part III

Power BI, like many Microsoft products, is multi-threaded.  This can be seen from the logs and even the Task Manager.  I know, I know…you’ve probably heard this part all before…

The importance of this information, is that the logs will display Process IDs, (PID) that are separate from the main Power BI Desktop executable, including the secondary processes..  Moving from the Power BI logs that reside in the Performance folder, (see Part I here) we can view and connect the PIDs and TID, (Transaction IDs) to information from the Task Manager and the data displayed:

Creating a Trace File from EM12

Creating a trace file from EM12c is quite easy and doesn’t require a DBA offering up the world to allow a developer or support person to perform this action.

Collaborate14 Session: The Art and Science of Tracing

Thank you all for coming to my session "The Art and Science of Tracing" at Collaborate 2014. As I mentioned, I prepared a full session even though this is supposed to be a quick tip. I hope you enjoyed it and get the value from the full presentation deck.

You can download

The slide deck
The scripts (this is a zip file. Right click and then Save As ...)

As always, your feedback will be immensely appreciated.

Investigating the wait interface via gdb.

For some time now, I am using gdb to trace the inner working of the Oracle database. The reason for using gdb instead of systemtap or Oracle’s dtrace is the lack of user-level tracing with Linux. I am using this on Linux because most of my work is happening on Linux.

In order to see the same information with gdb on the system calls of Oracle as strace, there’s the Oracle debug info repository. This requires a bit of explanation. When strace is used on a process doing IO that Oracle executes asynchronous, the IO calls as seen with strace look something like this: