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Troubleshooting

Multi-table

Here’s a problem (and I think it should be called a bug) that I first came across about 6 years ago, then forgot for a few years until it reappeared some time last year and then again a few days ago. The problem has been around for years (getting on for decades), and the first mention of it that I’ve found is MoS Bug 2891576, created in 2003, referring back to Oracle 9.2.0.1, The problem still exists in Oracle 19.2 (tested on LiveSQL).

Here’s the problem: assume you have a pair of tables (call them parent and child) with a referential integrity constraint connecting them. If the constraint is enabled and not deferred then the following code may fail, and if you’re really unlucky it may only fail on rare random occasions:

Troubleshooting

Here’s a question to provoke a little thought if you’ve got nothing more entertaining to do on a Sunday evening.  What threats do you think of when you see a statement like the following in (say) an AWR report, or in a query against v$sql ?

update tableX set
        col001 = :1, col002 = :2, col003 = :3, ...
        -- etc. 
        -- the names are supposed to indicate that the statement updates 302 columns
        -- etc.
        col301 = :301, col302 = :302
where
        pk_col = :303
;

I’ll be writing up some suggestions tomorrow (Monday, UK BST), possible linking to a few other articles for background reading.

Update

The first three comments have already hit the high points, but I’m going to jot down a few notes anyway.

The first two things that really (should) make an impact are:

Free Space

Several years ago I wrote a note about reporting dba_free_space and dba_extents to produce a map of the space usage in a tablespace in anticipation of messing about with moving or rebuilding objects to try and reduce the size of the files in the tablespace.  In the related page where I published the script I pointed out that a query against dba_extents would be expensive because it makes use of structure x$ktfbue which generates the information dynamically by reading segment header blocks.

Parse Solution

In the “Parse Puzzle” I posted a couple of days ago I showed a couple of extracts from an AWR report that showed contradictory results about the time the instance spent in parsing and hard parsing, and also showed an amazing factor of 4 difference between the DB Time and the “SQL ordered by Elapsed Time”. My example was modelling a real world anomaly I had come across, but was engineered to exaggerate the effect to make it easy to see what was going on.

Parse Puzzle

Here are some details from an AWR report covering a few minutes in the lifetime of an instance of 18.3. It’s a carefully constructed demonstration and all I’ve done is take an AWR snapshot, execute a single SQL statement, then take another snapshot, so the only thing captured by the report is the work done in that brief time interval. The purpose of the exercise is to demonstrate how some Oracle features can make a complete nonsense of the AWR. (I have, as I often do, produced a model that reproduces an affect that can appear in production but exaggerates the effect to make it more clearly visible.)

First the Time Model statistics:

Trouble-shooting

Here’s an answer I’ve just offered on the ODC database forum to a fairly generic type of problem.

The question was about finding out why a “program” that used to take only 10 minutes to complete is currently taking significantly longer. The system is running Standard Edition, and the program runs once per day. There’s some emphasis on the desirability of taking action while the program is still running with the following as the most recent statement of the requirements:

We have a program which run daily 10minutes and suddenly one day,it is running for more than 10minutes…in this case,we are asked to look into the backend session to check what exactly the session is doing.I understand we have to check the events,last sql etc..but we need to get the work done by that session in terms of buffergets or physical reads(in case of standard edition)

Redo Dumps

A thread started on the Oracle-L list-server a few days ago asking for help analysing a problem where a simple “insert values()” (that handled millions of rows per day) was running very slowly. There are many reasons why this might happen, ranging from the trivial (someone has locked the table in exclusive mode), through the slightly subtle (we’re trying to insert a row that collides on a uniqueness constraint with an uncommitted insert from another session) to the subtle (Oracle has to read through the undo to check current versions of blocks against read-consistent versions) ending up at the esoteric (the ASSM space management blocks are completely messed up again).

Execution Plan Puzzle

Here’s an execution plan that’s just been published on the ODC database forum. The plan comes from a call to dbms_xplan.display_cursor() with rowsource execution statistics enabled.

There’s something unusual about the execution statistics that I don’t think I’ve seen before – can anyone else see anything really odd, or (better still) anything which they would expect others to find odd but which they can easily explain.

A couple of hints:

Occurence

Before you comment – I do know that the title has a spelling mistake in it. That’s because the Oracle code uses exactly this spelling in one of the little-used features of tracing.

Lost time

Here’s a little puzzle that came up in the ODC database forum yesterday – I’ve got a query that has been captured by SQL Monitor, and it’s taking much longer to run than it should but the monitoring report isn’t telling me what I need to know about the time.

Here’s a little model to demonstrate the problem – I’m going to join a table to itself (the self join isn’t a necessary feature of the demonstration, I’ve just been a bit lazy in preparing data). Here’s a (competely truthful) description of the table: