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Tuning

Match_recognise – 2

In my previous post I presented a warning about the potential cost of sorting and the cost of failing to find a match after each pass of a long search. In a comment on that post Stew Ashton reminded me that the cost of repeatedly trying to find a match starting from “the next row down” could be less of a threat than the cost of “back-tracking” before moving to the next row down.

Taking the example from the previous posting to explain – the requirement was for customers who had executed a transaction in September but not October, and a match_recognize() clause suggested on the ODC (formerly OTN) database forum to implement this requirement was as follows:

Dynamic Sampling vs. Extended Statistics

On datawarehouse databases, I frequently recommend increasing the level of dynamic sampling because:

Direct path insert and IOTs

(Please tell me that I’m not the only one who thinks "Index Organized Table" instead of "Internet Of Things" when hearing IOT…)

This post is inspired by Connor McDonald and his blog post from a year ago about direct mode operations and IOTs.
You can read it here: https://connor-mcdonald.com/2016/07/04/direct-mode-operations-on-iots/amp/

While writing a redo parser for V00D00 I had to investigate this subject very closely from a redo log perspective. And this will be the subject of my 10-minute lightning talk at Oak Table World 2017 at Oracle Open World!

rollback internals

While researching redo log internals for V00D00 we had to face the fact, that we know shit about real transactional behavior. When I say "real", I mean – under the hood.
Even with a very simple stuff like COMMIT and ROLLBACK we were constantly amazed by the internal mechanisms.

Today let’s take ROLLBACK under the investigation. According to documentation:

The ROLLBACK statement ends the current transaction and undoes any changes made during that transaction.

Cool. But what it means? First of all, you have to realize that all changes in redo logs are in a form of REDO RECORD which has its own address, known as RBA or RS_ID.

Sample RS_ID (RBA) looks like this: 0x00000a.00008c0f.006c

How Oracle stores numbers internally

Before you proceed, please check out this short article written by Tanel Poder:
http://blog.tanelpoder.com/2010/09/02/which-number-takes-more-space-in-an-oracle-row/

In the documentation, you can find the following explanation about the internal numeric format:

Oracle stores numeric data in variable-length format. Each value is stored in scientific notation, with 1 byte used to store the exponent and up to 20 bytes to store the mantissa. The resulting value is limited to 38 digits of precision. Oracle does not store leading and trailing zeros. For example, the number 412 is stored in a format similar to 4.12 x 102, with 1 byte used to store the exponent(2) and 2 bytes used to store the three significant digits of the mantissa(4,1,2). Negative numbers include the sign in their length.

How Oracle stores numbers internally

Before you proceed, please check out this short article written by Tanel Poder:
http://blog.tanelpoder.com/2010/09/02/which-number-takes-more-space-in-an-oracle-row/

In the documentation, you can find the following explanation about the internal numeric format:

Oracle stores numeric data in variable-length format. Each value is stored in scientific notation, with 1 byte used to store the exponent and up to 20 bytes to store the mantissa. The resulting value is limited to 38 digits of precision. Oracle does not store leading and trailing zeros. For example, the number 412 is stored in a format similar to 4.12 x 102, with 1 byte used to store the exponent(2) and 2 bytes used to store the three significant digits of the mantissa(4,1,2). Negative numbers include the sign in their length.

Index bouncy scan

There’s a thread running on OTN at present about deleting huge volumes of duplicated data from a table (to reduce it from 1.1 billion to about 22 million rows). The thread isn’t what I’m going to talk about, though, other than quoting some numbers from it to explain what this post is about.

Delete/Insert

Many of the questions that appear on OTN are deceptively simple until you start thinking carefully about the implications; one such showed up a little while ago:

What i want to do is to delete rows from table where it matches condition upper(CATEGORY_DESCRIPTION) like ‘%BOOK%’.

At the same time i want these rows to be inserted into other table.

The first problem is this: how carefully does the requirement need to be stated before you can decide how to address it? Trying to imagine awkward scenarios, or boundary conditions, can help to clarify the issue.

If you delete before you insert, how do you find the data to insert ?