Tuning

Hash Joins

I’ve written notes about the different joins in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

12c Join Views

There are a couple of posts on the blog describing problems with updateable join views or, to be more precise, join views which were key-preserved but which the optimizer did not recognize as key-preserved. Both scenarios are addressed in 12c:

12c subquery factoring

I’ve written a few notes about anomalies in subquery factoring (with subquery) in the past, principally making a fuss about the fact that moving an inline view into a “with subquery” can cause a plan to change even when the internal code moves the subquery back in line. With the arrival of 12c one of my first sets of tests was to rerun all the examples to see how many of them had been addressed. I hadn’t written about as many examples as I had thought, and some of them had been fixed before 12c, but here are few references to a couple of outstanding items that I thought worth a mention:

12c First N

There have been a couple of nice posts about the “Top N” (or First N / Next N)  syntax that has appeared in 12c, here and here, for example. I particularly like the first set of examples because they include some execution plans that give you a good idea of what’s  going on under the covers. “Under the covers” is important, because if you don’t actually have a large data set to test on you might not realise what impact a “Top N” query might have on a production data set.

12c Adaptive Optimization

Since everyone seems to be all twitterpated about Oracle Database 12c this week, I thought I’d post a quick note to let you know that the slides from the presentation on 12c Adaptive Optimization I did at the Hotsos Symposium 2013 (with a lot of help from Maria) are now available in the Whitepapers / Presentations section of this blog.

While I’m on the topic, I found this little blurb in the Oracle Database 12c Release 1 New Features Guide:

SQL Gone Bad – But Plan Not Changed? – Part 2

In Part 1 of this series I talked about the basic problem, which is that plan_hash_values are not based on the whole plan. One of the main missing components is the predicates associated with a plan, but there are other missing parts as was pointed out in Part 1 of Randolf Geist’s post on the topic. At any rate, predicates seem to be the most critical of the missing parts.

The purpose of this second post on the topic is to talk about diagnosis. Basically how do you identify when some other part of a plan has changed that doesn’t affect the plan_hash_value, specifically a predicate.

Same Plan

An interesting little problem appeared on the Oracle-L mailing list earlier on this week – a query ran fairly quickly when statistics hadn’t been collected on the tables, but then ran rather slowly after stats collection even though the plan hadn’t changed, and the tkprof results were there to prove the point. Here are the two outputs (edited slightly for width – the original showed three sets of row stats, the 1st, avg and max, but since the query had only been run once the three columns showed the same results in each case):

Tuning paramon.sql

I know no one really likes the term “tuning” these days, but it’s a short catchy word that gets the idea across. So I’ll just stick with it for the title of this post.

Note that this is one of those posts that’s not really supposed to be about how to solve a particular problem. It’s really just a story about a distraction that I ran into and I how I thought about getting around the issue and then ultimately resolving the root cause. Maybe you will find it instructive to see the process.

Subpartition stats

You might have expected the following query ought to run reasonably efficiently, after all it seems to be targeted very accurately at precisely the few rows of information I’m interested in:

select
	column_name,
	avg_col_len
from
	dba_subpart_col_statistics
where
	owner             = 'TEST_USER'
and 	table_name        = 'TEST_COMP'
and	subpartition_name = 'P_MAX_D'

I’m after some subpartition column stats (so that I can work out whether a subpartition of a local index on a composite partition is roughly the right size) and I’m querying the view by the only columns that seem to be there to allow me to access the data efficiently. Unfortunately the execution plan isn’t doing what I need it to do. The following plan is coming from a small 11.2.0.3 database with up to date statistics:

Subquery Factoring

I have a small collection of postings where I’ve described anomalies or limitations in subquery factoring (the “with subquery”, or Common Table Expression (CTE) to give it the official ANSI name). Here’s another example of Oracle’s code not behaving consistently. You may recognise the basic query from yesterday’s example of logical tuning – so I won’t reprint the code to generate the data sets. This examples in this note were created on 11.2.0.2 – we start with a simple query and its execution plan: