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Tuning

Not In – 2

My note on “NOT IN” subqueries is one of the most popular on my blog, staying in the top 5 hits for the last five years – but it’s getting a bit old, so it’s about time I said something new about “NOT IN” – especially since the Null Aware Anti Join has been around such a long time. The example I want to talk about is, as so often, something that came up as a problem on a customer site. Here’s a bit of SQL to model the situation, which is currently running under Oracle 11.1.0.7:

Subquery Factoring

When I wrote a note last week about the fixes to the subquery factoring optimizer code in 11.2.0.3, I finished with a comment about having more to say on the test case if I materialized the subquery. Today’s the day to talk about it. As a reminder, here’s the query, but with the /*+ materialize */ hint in place:

with subq as (
	select
	/*+ materialize */
		outer.*
	from
		emp outer
	where
		sal > 1000000
	and	outer.sal > (
			select
				avg(inner.sal)
 			from	emp inner
			where	inner.dept_no = outer.dept_no
		)
	)
select	*
from	subq
;

Here are the three plans – from 10.2.0.5, 11.1.0.7, and 11.2.0.3 respectively:

Subquery Factoring

Here’s an interesting little conundrum about subquery factoring that hasn’t changed in the recent (11.2.0.3) patch for subquery factoring. It came to me from Jared Still (a fellow member of Oak Table Network) shortly after I’d made some comments about the patch. It’s an example based on the scott/tiger schema – which I’ve extracted from the script $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlsampl.sql (though the relevant scripts may be demobld.sql or scott.sql, depending on version).

As usual I’ve used an 8KB block size, LMT with uniform 1MB extents, and no ASSM to hold the data. I won’t reproduce the code to generate the schema, just the versions of the query with, then without, subquery factoring:

Tuning is in the eye of the beholder… Memory is memory right?

It is human nature to draw from experiences to make sense of our surroundings.  This holds true in life and performance tuning.   A veteran systems administrator will typically tune a system different from an Oracle DBA.  This is fine, but often what is obvious to one, is not to the other.  It is sometimes necessary to take a step back to tune from another perspective.

I recently have ran across a few cases where a customer was tuning “Sorts” in the database by adding memory. Regardless of your prospective, every one knows memory is faster than disk; and the goal of any good tuner is to use as much in memory as possible.   So, when it was noticed by the systems administrator that the “TEMP” disks for Oracle were doing a tremendous amount of IO,  the answer was obvious right?

Subquery Factoring

It’s always worth browsing through the list of Oracle’s bug fixes each time a new release or patch comes out because it can give you clues about where to look for problems in your production release – and how to anticipate problems on the upgrade. This article is an example of a fix that I found while while looking at the note for 11.2.0.3 quite recently.

All Things Oracle

Last year I wrote a few articles for Simpletalk, a web service created by Redgate for users of SQL Server. This year, Redgate is setting up a similar service called “All things Oracle” (I’ve added a link in my blogroll) for Oracle users, and I’ve volunteered to write articles for them occasionally.

Some of the stuff they publish will be complete articles on their website, some will be short introductions with links to the authors’ own websites. My first article for them has just been posted – it’s an article that captures a couple of key points from the optimizer presentation I did at the UKOUG conference a couple of weeks ago.

Test Data

The UKOUG conference is over for another year – but it has left me with plenty to do and lots of things to investigate. Here’s just one little point that I picked up during one of the 10 minute “Oak Talks” that members of the Oak Table Network were doing in the lunch breaks.

There is a fairly well-known strategy for generating a list of numbers by using a “select from dual … connect by …” query, but I hadn’t realised that there were two ways of using it. The code I’ve usually used is this:

select
        rownum id 
from
        dual 
connect by 
        rownum <= 4000
;

But it looks as if most people use it like this:

select
        rownum id 
from
        dual 
connect by 
        level <= 4000
;

Tuning Oracle to Make a Query Slower

I had an interesting little project this morning. Of course it takes longer to write it down than to do actually do it, but it was kind of interesting and since I haven’t done a post in quite some time (and it’s the day before Thanksgiving, so it’s pretty quite at the office anyway) I decided to share. One of the Enkitec guys (Tim Fox) was doing a performance comparison between various platforms (Exadata using it’s IB Storage Network, Oracle Database Appliance (ODA) using it’s direct attached storage, and a standard database on a Dell box using EMC fiber channel attached storage). The general test idea was simple – see how the platforms stacked up for a query that required a full scan of a large table. More specifically, what Tim wanted to see was the relative speed at which the various storage platforms could return data.

I Can Help You Trace It

The first product I ever created after leaving Oracle Corporation in 1999 was a 3-day course about optimizing Oracle performance.

Advice from the Internet

A somewhat recursive post here. There are a number of forums around the internet which Oracle professionals increasingly use to research various issues, discover new features and diagnose problems. One such is the relatively new Database Administrators stack exchange site. For various reasons I came across this thread and in particular a piece of advice [...]