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Star Transformation

A little while ago I published a note explaining how it was possible to find queries which ran faster if you manually de-coupled the index and table accesses. Here’s a further example that came up in discussion on a client site recently. The query looks something like this (at least in concept, although it was a little more complex, with some messy bits around the edges):

select
	ord.*
from
	products	prd,
	customers	cst,
	orders		ord
where
	prd.grp = 50
and	cst.grp = 50
and	ord.id_prd = prd.id
and	ord.id_cst = cst.id
;

There are indexes on products(id), customers(id) and orders(id), as well as indexes on orders(id_prd) and orders(id_cst). Basically it’s a collection of primary key and “foreign key” indexes – except there are no defined constraints and none of the indexes is unique.

The production “orders” table is very large (hundreds of millions of rows). There are lots of customers – and the orders for each customer are scattered throughout the entire orders table; similarly there are lots of products, and the orders for each product are scattered throughout the orders table. What execution plans (with the right indexes, of course) might you get for this query. There are two obvious possibilities:

-----------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost  |
-----------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT    |           |    11 |  1584 |   492 |
|*  1 |  HASH JOIN          |           |    11 |  1584 |   492 |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL | CUSTOMERS |   100 |   900 |    14 |
|*  3 |   HASH JOIN         |           |  3314 |   436K|   477 |
|*  4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| PRODUCTS  |   100 |   900 |    14 |
|   5 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| ORDERS    |  1000K|   120M|   446 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - access("ORD"."ID_CST"="CST"."ID")
   2 - filter("CST"."GRP"=50)
   3 - access("ORD"."ID_PRD"="PRD"."ID")
   4 - filter("PRD"."GRP"=50)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                      | Name       | Rows  | Bytes | Cost  |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT               |            |    11 |  1584 | 10223 |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                  |            |       |       |       |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                 |            |    11 |  1584 | 10223 |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS                |            |  3314 |   436K|  3614 |
|*  4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL          | PRODUCTS   |   100 |   900 |    14 |
|   5 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| ORDERS     |    33 |  4158 |    36 |
|*  6 |      INDEX RANGE SCAN          | ORD_PRD_FK |    33 |       |     2 |
|*  7 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN            | CST_I1     |     1 |       |     1 |
|*  8 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID  | CUSTOMERS  |     1 |     9 |     2 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   4 - filter("PRD"."GRP"=50)
   6 - access("ORD"."ID_PRD"="PRD"."ID")
   7 - access("ORD"."ID_CST"="CST"."ID")
   8 - filter("CST"."GRP"=50)

The first option is to hash the two dimension tables into memory then probe each in turn after a tablescan of the orders table – and this could be a very effective choice in some cases; the second option is to drive from one of the dimension tables into the orders table, picking up a relatively large number of rows, then discard a large fraction of those rows by indexing (or possibly doing a hash join) into the second dimension table. (Obviously the roles of products and customers could be reversed in the nested loop plan I’ve shown).

Both plans are likely to be rather expensive – a full scan on orders could be a huge amount of I/O in the form of “db file scattered read” waits; the indexed access path from one dimension to the orders table could be a huge amount of I/O in the form of “db file sequential read” wait collecting rows we won’t eventually need. In the correct circumstances (with the right data patterns) then, we might like to see a star transformation. But there are two possible problems:

  • It is “common knowledge” that you need primary keys on the dimension tables to do a star transformation. (In fact I was sure of this until about 30 minutes ago but then I discovered I was wrong.)
  • It is also “common knowledge” that you need bitmap indexes on the fact table to do a star transformation. Again this is wrong (but fortunately I’ve known about that for years).

So if we enable star transformations (alter session set star_transformation_enabled=true) we can get a plan that looks like this:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                             | Name                       | Rows  | Bytes | Cost  |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                      |                            |     1 |   136 |   102 |

|   1 |  TEMP TABLE TRANSFORMATION            |                            |       |       |       |
|   2 |   LOAD AS SELECT                      | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6601_17047D9 |       |       |       |
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL                  | CUSTOMERS                  |   100 |   900 |    14 |
|   4 |   LOAD AS SELECT                      | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6601_17047D9 |       |       |       |
|*  5 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL                  | PRODUCTS                   |   100 |   900 |    14 |

|*  6 |   HASH JOIN                           |                            |     1 |   136 |    74 |
|*  7 |    HASH JOIN                          |                            |     1 |   131 |    71 |

|   8 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID       | ORDERS                     |    11 |  1400 |    68 |
|   9 |      BITMAP CONVERSION TO ROWIDS      |                            |       |       |       |
|  10 |       BITMAP AND                      |                            |       |       |       |

|  11 |        BITMAP MERGE                   |                            |       |       |       |
|  12 |         BITMAP KEY ITERATION          |                            |       |       |       |
|  13 |          TABLE ACCESS FULL            | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6600_17047D9 |     1 |    13 |     2 |
|  14 |          BITMAP CONVERSION FROM ROWIDS|                            |       |       |       |
|* 15 |           INDEX RANGE SCAN            | ORD_CST_FK                 |       |       |     3 |

|  16 |        BITMAP MERGE                   |                            |       |       |       |
|  17 |         BITMAP KEY ITERATION          |                            |       |       |       |
|  18 |          TABLE ACCESS FULL            | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6601_17047D9 |     1 |    13 |     2 |
|  19 |          BITMAP CONVERSION FROM ROWIDS|                            |       |       |       |
|* 20 |           INDEX RANGE SCAN            | ORD_PRD_FK                 |       |       |     3 |

|  21 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL                 | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6600_17047D9 |   100 |   500 |     2 |
|  22 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL                  | SYS_TEMP_0FD9D6601_17047D9 |   100 |   500 |     2 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   3 - filter("CST"."GRP"=50)
   5 - filter("PRD"."GRP"=50)
   6 - access("ORD"."ID_PRD"="C0")
   7 - access("ORD"."ID_CST"="C0")
  15 - access("ORD"."ID_CST"="C0")
  20 - access("ORD"."ID_PRD"="C0")

In this example you can see that Oracle has decided to use a hash join to do a “join-back” to the dimension tables and has decided to extract the subset of rows (grp = 50) from each of those tables and save them in a global temporary. This join-back is a little odd since the query isn’t selecting any date from those two tables so we shouldn’t need to do it – but I think that may be a side effect of not having the primary key declared.

I’ve broken the plan up a little bit to make it a little easier to see the critical steps:

  • Lines 11 – 15 we select the index ranges we want from the customer index on orders, convert to bitmaps and merge.
  • Lines 16 – 20 we do the same for the products index on orders
  • Lines 8 – 10 we do the “bitmap and” between the two constructed bit strings, convert to rowids, and pick up exactly the rows we want
  • Lines 6,7,21,22 show two hash joins to the temporary tables which represent the subset of rows we have from customers and products
  • Lines 1 – 5 are where we started by extracting the two subsets into a form of internalised global temporary table.

If this doesn’t work well enough for you – and, allowing for a few little tweaks here and there, it really should – or if there is something about your code that makes it impossible for Oracle to do a star transformation, here’s an example of taking total control by restructuring the SQL to do a similar operation:

select
	ord.*
from
	(
	select
		/*+
			leading(prd ord)
			use_nl(ord)
			no_merge
		*/
		ord.rowid 	prid
	from
		products	prd,
		orders		ord
		where
		prd.grp = 50
	and	ord.id_prd = prd.id
		)	prid,
	(
	select
		/*+
			leading(cst ord)
			use_nl(ord)
			no_merge
		*/
		ord.rowid 	crid
	from
		customers	cst,
		orders		ord
	where
		cst.grp = 50
	and	ord.id_cst = cst.id
	)	crid,
	orders	ord
where
	prid.prid = crid.crid
and	ord.rowid = prid.prid

With the no_merge hints we produce two result sets: prid - the rowids from the orders table for all rows which match the products we are interested in; and crid – the rowids from the orders table for all rows which match the customers we are interested in.

We then do a join between crid and prid – which has to leave us with just those rowids for the rows which represent the customers we’re interested in who have placed orders for products we’re interested in. So we can then do a join, by rowid, to the orders table to collect the data for those orders. Here’s the plan:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name       | Rows  | Bytes | Cost  |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |            |    11 |  1650 |   570 |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS               |            |    11 |  1650 |   570 |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN                 |            |    11 |   264 |   559 |
|   3 |    VIEW                     |            |  3361 | 40332 |   277 |
|   4 |     NESTED LOOPS            |            |  3361 | 87386 |   277 |
|*  5 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL      | CUSTOMERS  |    98 |   882 |    81 |
|*  6 |      INDEX RANGE SCAN       | ORD_CST_FK |    34 |   578 |     2 |
|   7 |    VIEW                     |            |  3390 | 40680 |   281 |
|   8 |     NESTED LOOPS            |            |  3390 | 88140 |   281 |
|*  9 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL      | PRODUCTS   |   100 |   900 |    81 |
|* 10 |      INDEX RANGE SCAN       | ORD_PRD_FK |    34 |   578 |     2 |
|  11 |   TABLE ACCESS BY USER ROWID| ORDERS     |     1 |   126 |     1 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - access("PRID"."PRID"="CRID"."CRID")
   5 - filter("CST"."GRP"=50)
   6 - access("ORD"."ID_CST"="CST"."ID")
   9 - filter("PRD"."GRP"=50)
  10 - access("ORD"."ID_PRD"="PRD"."ID")

The SQL has obviously become more complex – and complexity is generally something to be wary of as it’s an easy step from “complex” to “wrong”. So don’t try something like this unless you’re sure it’s necessary, and then document what you’re doing very carefully.

Footnote:

If you want to play around with this example, here’s the code to generate the tables. I was using my standard LMT, 1MB uniform extents, 8KB block size, freelist management model. The database was version 11.1.0.6 and CPU costing was disabled.

create table products
as
select
	rownum			id,
	mod(rownum,300)		grp,
	lpad(rownum,10,'0')	small_vc,
	rpad('x',100)		padding
from
	all_objects
where
	rownum <= 30000;

create index prd_i1 on products(id);
-- alter table products add constraint prd_pk primary key(id);

create table customers
as
select
	rownum			id,
	mod(rownum,300)		grp,
	lpad(rownum,10,'0')	small_vc,
	rpad('x',100)		padding
from
	all_objects
where
	rownum <= 30000;

create index cst_i1 on customers(id);
-- alter table customers add constraint cst_pk primary key(id);

create table orders
as
with generator as (
	select	--+ materialize
		rownum id
	from dual
	connect by
		rownum <= 1000)
select
	rownum			id,
	trunc(dbms_random.value(1,30000))	id_prd,
	trunc(dbms_random.value(1,30000))	id_cst,
	lpad(rownum,10,'0')	small_vc,
	rpad('x',100)		padding
from
	generator	v1,
	generator	v2
where
	rownum  <= 1000000;

create index ord_prd_fk on orders(id_prd);
create index ord_cst_fk on orders(id_cst);

Reminder and Public Appearances 2011

First, a reminder – my Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting v2.0 online seminar starts next week already. Last chance to sign up, I can accept registrations until Sunday :-)

I won’t do another AOT seminar before Oct (or Nov) this year. More details and sign-up here:

I have rescheduled my Advanced SQL Tuning and Partitioning & Parallel Execution for Performance seminars too. I will do them in September/October. Unfortunately I’m too busy right now to do them before the summer.

Public Appearances:

  • I will be speaking at the UKOUG Exadata Special Event in London on 18th April
  • I have submitted a few papers for Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco as well (end of Sep/beginning of Oct), all about Exadata. Let’s see how it goes, but I’ll be there anyway, which means that I’ll probably show up at the Oracle Closed World event too!

And that’s all the travel I will do this year…

Virtual Conferences:

I’ll soon announce the 2nd EsSN virtual conference too ;-)

Free online stuff:

Perhaps in a month or so I will do another hacking session (I’ll plan 2 hours this time, 1 hour isn’t nearly enough for going deep). The topic will probably be about low-level details of SQL plan execution internals… stay tuned!

Latch contention troubleshooting case study and Flashback Database performance issues with LOBs

Steve Bamber has written up a case study of library cache latch contention troubleshooting of an Apex application with LatchProf. I’m happy that others also see the value and have had success with my new LatchProf based latch contention troubleshooting approach which takes into account both sides of the contention story (latch waiters and latch holders/blockers) as opposed to the guesswork used previously (hey if it’s shared pool latch contention – is must be about bad SQL not using bind variables …. NOT always…)

Anyway, I’m happy. If you have success stories with LatchProf, please let me know!

As a second topic of interest, Laimutis Nedzinskas has written some good notes about the effect and overhead of Flashback Database option when you are using and modifying (nocache) LOBs. We’ve exchanged some mails on this topic and yeah, my clients have sure seen some problems with this combination as well. You basically want to keep your LOBs cached when using FB database…

MOATS: The Mother of All Tuning Scripts!

People talk about the Oracle SQL Developer 3 being out, which is cool, but I have something even cooler for you today ;-)

I finally figured out how to convert my screen-recordings to uploadable videos, so that the text wouldn’t get unreadable and blurry.

So, here’s the first video, about a tool called MOATS, which we have built together with fellow OakTable Network member and a PL/SQL wizard Adrian Billington (of oracle-developer.net).

Here’s the video, it’s under 3 minutes long. Play the video in full screen for best results (and if it’s too slow loading, change it to lower resolution from HD mode):

Check it out and if you like MOATS, you can download it from Adrian’s website site (current version 1.05) and make sure you read the README.txt file in the zip!

Also thanks to Randolf Geist for finding and fixing some bugs in our alpha code… Note that MOATS is still kind of beta right now…

P.S. I will post my ORA-4031 and shared pool hacking video real soon now, too! :-)

P.P.S. Have you already figured out how it works?! ;-)

Update: Now you can suggest new features and improvement requests here:

An index of my TPT scripts

A lot of people have asked me whether there’s some sort of index or “table of contents” of my TPT scripts (there’s over 500 scripts in the tpt_public.zip file – http://tech.e2sn.com/oracle-scripts-and-tools )

I have planned to create such index for years, but never got to it. I probably never will :) So a good way to extract the descriptions of some scripts is this (run the command in the directory where you extracted my scripts to):

$ grep -i Purpose: *.sql | awk -F: ‘{ printf(“%20s %-50s\n”, $1, $3) }’
            bhla.sql      Report which blocks are in buffer cache, protected by a cache
         bufprof.sql      Display buffer gets done by a session and their reason
            calc.sql      Basic calculator and dec/hex converter       
        channels.sql      Report KSR channel message counts by channel endpoints
        curheaps.sql      Show main cursor data block heap sizes and their contents
             dba.sql      Convert Data Block Address (a 6 byte hex number) to file#, block#
             ddl.sql      Extracts DDL statements for specified objects
              df.sql  Show Oracle tablespace free space in Unix df style
        diag_sid.sql      Display current Session Wait info            
        diag_sid.sql      An easy to use Oracle session-level performance snapshot utility
           disco.sql      Generates commands for disconnecting selected sessions
     getplusparm.sql      get sqlplus parameter value (such linesize, pagesize, sqlcode,
            grpn.sql      Quick group by query for aggregating Numeric columns
            hash.sql      Show the hash value, SQL_ID and child number of previously
             i2h.sql      Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Seminar demo script
              im.sql      Display In-Memory Undo (IMU) buffer usage    
            init.sql  Initializes sqlplus variables for 156 character terminal
       kglbroken.sql                                                   
       kglbroken.sql      Report broken kgl locks for an object this can be used for 
            kill.sql      Generates commands for killing selected sessions
              la.sql      Show which latch occupies a given memory address and its stats
     lastchanged.sql      Detect when a datablock in table was last changed
       latchprof.sql      Perform high-frequency sampling on V$LATCHHOLDER
   latchprof_old.sql      Perform high-frequency sampling on V$LATCHHOLDER
      latchprofx.sql      Perform high-frequency sampling on V$LATCHHOLDER
              lh.sql      Show latch holding SIDs and latch details from V$LATCHHOLDER
             lhp.sql      Perform high-frequency sampling on V$LATCHHOLDER
            lhpx.sql      Perform high-frequency sampling on V$LATCHHOLDER
     lotshparses.sql      Generate Lots of hard parses and shared pool activity 
    lotshparses2.sql      Generate Lots of hard parses and shared pool activity 
        lotslios.sql      Generate Lots of Logical IOs for testing purposes
        lotspios.sql      Generate Lots of Physical IOs for testing purposes
     lotssparses.sql      Generate Lots of soft parses and library cache/mutex activity 
    lotssparses2.sql      Generate Lots of soft parses and library cache/mutex activity 
       mutexprof.sql      Display KGX mutex sleep history from v$mutex_sleep_history
       nonshared.sql      Print reasons for non-shared child cursors from v$sql_shared_cursor
      nonshared2.sql      Show the reasons why more child cursors were created instead of
      ostackprof.sql      Take target process stack samples and show an execution profile
            pmem.sql      Show process memory usage breakdown – lookup by process SPID
     pmem_detail.sql      Show process memory usage breakdown details – lookup by process SPID
        prefetch.sql      Show KCB layer prefetch                      
          pvalid.sql      Show valid parameter values from V$PARAMETER_VALID_VALUES
        rowcache.sql      Show parent rowcache entries mathcing an object name
              rs.sql      Display available Redo Strands               
               s.sql      Display current Session Wait and SQL_ID info (10g+)
          sample.sql      Sample any V$ view or X$ table and display aggregated results
      sampleaddr.sql      High-frequency sampling of contents of a SGA memory address
             ses.sql      Display Session statistics for given sessions, filter by
            ses2.sql      Display Session statistics for given sessions, filter by
        sgastatx.sql      Show shared pool stats by sub-pool from X$KSMSS
            smem.sql      Show process memory usage breakdown – lookup by session ID
     smem_detail.sql      Show process memory usage breakdown details – lookup by session ID
         snapper.sql      An easy to use Oracle session-level performance snapshot utility
     snapper3.15.sql      An easy to use Oracle session-level performance snapshot utility
      snapper_v1.sql      An easy to use Oracle session-level performance snapshot utility
      snapper_v2.sql      An easy to use Oracle session-level performance snapshot utility
            stat.sql      Execute SQL statement in script argument and report basic
              sw.sql      Display current Session Wait info            
             sw2.sql      Display current Session Wait info            
             swg.sql      Display given Session Wait info grouped by state and event
             swo.sql      Display current Session Wait info            
          topsql.sql      Show TOP SQL ordered by user-provided criteria
            usql.sql      Show another session’s SQL directly from library cache
           usqlx.sql      Show another session’s SQL directly from library cache
        waitprof.sql      Sample V$SESSION_WAIT at high frequency and show resulting 
              xb.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan with execution 
            xde2.sql      Describe X$ tables, column offsets and report indexed fixed table
              xm.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan directly from library cache
             xma.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan directly from library cache
            xmai.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan with execution 
             xms.sql      Explain your last SQL statements execution plan with execution 
            xmsh.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan with execution 
            xmsi.sql      Explain a SQL statements execution plan with execution

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LOBREAD SQL Trace entry in Oracle 11.2 (and tracing OPI calls with event 10051)

A few days ago I looked into a SQL Tracefile of some LOB access code and saw a LOBREAD entry there. This is a really welcome improvement (or should I say, bugfix of a lacking feature) for understanding resource consumption by LOB access OPI calls. Check the bottom of the output below:

*** 2011-03-17 14:34:37.242
WAIT #47112801352808: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 189021 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99584 tim=1300390477242725
WAIT #0: nam='gc cr multi block request' ela= 309 file#=10 block#=20447903 class#=1 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243368
WAIT #0: nam='cell multiblock physical read' ela= 283 cellhash#=379339958 diskhash#=787888372 bytes=32768 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243790
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477243865
[...snipped...]
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244205
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 4 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244221
WAIT #0: nam='gc cr multi block request' ela= 232 file#=10 block#=20447911 class#=1 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477244560
WAIT #0: nam='cell multiblock physical read' ela= 882 cellhash#=379339958 diskhash#=787888372 bytes=32768 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245579
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 16 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2020 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245685
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 6 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=2048 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245706
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 5 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1792 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390477245720
#ff0000;">LOBREAD: c=1000,e=2915,p=8,cr=5,cu=0,tim=1300390477245735

In past versions of Oracle the CPU (c=) usage figures and other stats like number of physical/logical reads of the LOB chunk read OPI call were just lost – they were never reported in the tracefile. In past only the most common OPI calls, like PARSE, EXEC, BIND, FETCH (and recently CLOSE cursor) were instrumented with SQL Tracing. But since 11.2(.0.2?) the LOBREAD’s are printed out too. This is good, as it reduces the amount of guesswork needed to figure out what are those WAITs for cursor #0 – which is really a pseudocursor.

Why cursor#0? It’s because normally, with PARSE/EXEC/BIND/FETCH, you always had to specify a cursor slot number you operated on (if you fetch from cursor #5, it means that Oracle process went to slot #5 in the open cursor array in your session’s UGA and followed the pointers to shared cursor’s executable parts in library cache from there). But LOB interface works differently – if you select a LOB column using your query (cursor), then all your application gets is a LOB LOCATOR (sort of a pointer with LOB item ID and consistent read/version SCN). Then it’s your application which must issue another OPI call (LOBREAD) to read the chunks of that LOB out from the database. And the LOB locator is independent from any cursors, it doesn’t follow the same cursor API as regular SQL statements (as it requires way different functionality compared to a regular select or update statement).

So, whenever a wait happened in your session due to an access using a LOB locator, then there’s no specific cursor responsible for it (as far as Oracle sees internally) and that’s why a fake, pseudocursor #0 is used.

Note that on versions earlier than 11.2(.0.2?) when the LOBREAD wasn’t printed out to trace – you can use OPI call tracing (OPI stands for Oracle Program Interface and is the server-side counterpart to OCI API in the client side) using event 10051. First enable SQL Trace and then the event 10051 (or the other way around if you like):

SQL> @oerr 10051

ORA-10051: trace OPI calls

SQL> alter session set events '10051 trace name context forever, level 1';

Session altered.

Now run some LOB access code and check the tracefile:

*** 2011-03-17 14:37:07.178
WAIT #47112806168696: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 6491763 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627178602
OPI CALL: type=105 argc= 2 cursor=  0 name=Cursor close all
CLOSE #47112806168696:c=0,e=45,dep=0,type=1,tim=1300390627178731
OPI CALL: type=94 argc=28 cursor=  0 name=V8 Bundled Exec
=====================
PARSING IN CURSOR #47112802701552 len=19 dep=0 uid=93 oct=3 lid=93 tim=1300390627179807 hv=1918872834 ad='271cc1480' sqlid='3wg0udjt5zb82'
select * from t_lob
END OF STMT
PARSE #47112802701552:c=1000,e=1027,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=1,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627179805
EXEC #47112802701552:c=0,e=29,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=0,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627179884
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627179939
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 238812 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627418785
OPI CALL: type= 5 argc= 2 cursor= 26 name=FETCH
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627418945
FETCH #47112802701552:c=0,e=93,p=0,cr=5,cu=0,mis=0,r=1,dep=0,og=1,plh=3547887701,tim=1300390627418963
WAIT #47112802701552: nam='SQL*Net message from client' ela= 257633 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627676629
#ff0000;">OPI CALL: type=96 argc=21 cursor=  0 name=#ff0000;">LOB/FILE operations
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627676788
[...snip...]
WAIT #0: nam='SQL*Net more data to client' ela= 2 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1792 p3=0 obj#=99585 tim=1300390627677054
LOBREAD: c=0,e=321,p=0,cr=5,cu=0,tim=1300390627677064

Check the bold and especially the red string above.  Tracing OPI calls gives you some extra details of what kind of tasks are executed in the session. The “LOB/FILE operations” call indicates that whatever lines come after it (unlike SQL trace call lines where all the activity happens before a call line is printed (with some exceptions of course)) are done for this OPI call (until a next OPI call is printed out). OPI call tracing should work even on ancient database versions…

By the way, if you are wondering, what’s the cursor number 47112801352808 in the “WAIT #47112801352808″ above? Shouldn’t the cursor numbers be small numbers?

Well, in 11.2.0.2 this was also changed. Before that, the X in CURSOR #X (and PARSE #X, BIND #X, EXEC #X, FETCH #X) represented the slot number in your open cursor array (controlled by open_cursors) in your session’s UGA. Now, the tracefile dumps out the actual address of that cursor. 47112801352808 in HEX is 2AD94DC9FC68 and it happens to reside in the UGA of my session.

Naturally I asked Cary Millsap about whether he had spotted this LOBREAD already and yes, Cary’s way ahead of me – he said that Method-R’s mrskew tool v2.0, which will be out soon, will support it too.

It’s hard to not end up talking about Cary’s work when talking about performance profiling and especially Oracle SQL trace, so here are a few very useful bits which you should know about:

If you want to understand the SQL trace & profiling stuff more, then the absolute must document is Cary’s paper on the subject – Mastering Performance with Extended SQL Trace:

Also, if you like to optimize your work like me (in other words: you’re proactively lazy ;-) and you want to avoid some boring “where-the-heck-is-this-tracefile-now” and “scp-copy-it-over-to-my-pc-for-analysis” work then check out Cary’s MrTrace plugin (costs ~50 bucks and has a 30-day trial) for SQL Developer. I’ve ended up using it myself regularly although I still tend to avoid GUIs:

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ORA-4031 errors, contention, cursor management issues and shared pool fragmentation – free secret seminar!

Free stuff! Free stuff! Free stuff! :-)

The awesome dudes at E2SN have done it again! (and yes, Tom, this time the “we at E2SN Ltd” doesn’t mean only me alone ;-)

On Tuesday 22nd March I’ll hold two (yes two) Secret Oracle Hacking Sessions – about ORA-04031: unable to allocate x bytes of shared memory errors, cursor management issues and other shared pool related problems (like fragmentation). This event is free for all! You’ll just need to be fast enough to register, both events have 100 attendee limit (due to my GotoWebinar accont limitations).

I am going to run this online event twice, so total 200 people can attend (don’t register for both events, please). One event is in the morning (my time) to cater for APAC/EMEA region and the other session is for EMEA/US/Americas audience.

The content will be the same in both sessions. There will be no slides (you cant fix your shared pool problems with slides!) but there will be demos, scripts, live examples and fun (for the geeks among us anyway – others go and read some slides instead ;-)!

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Exadata CAN do smart scans on bitmap indexes

As I’m finishing up a performance chapter for the Exadata book (a lot of work!), I thought to take a quick break and write a blog entry.

This is not really worth putting into my Oracle Exadata Performance series (which so far has only 1 article in it anyway) .. so this is a little stand-alone article …

Everybody knows that the Exadata smart scan can be used when scanning tables (and table partitions). You should also know that smart scan can be used with fast full scan on Oracle B-tree indexes (a fast full scan on an index segment is just like a full table scan, only on the index segment (and ignoring branch blocks)).

For some reason there’s a (little) myth circulating that smart scans aren’t used for scanning bitmap indexes.

So, here’s evidence, that smart scan can be used when scanning bitmap indexes:

SQL> select /*+ tanel3 */ count(*) from t1 where owner like '%XYZXYZ%';

...

Plan hash value: 39555139

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                             | Name        | E-Rows | Cost (%CPU)|
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                      |             |        |   505 (100)|
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE                       |             |      1 |            |
|   2 |   BITMAP CONVERSION COUNT             |             |    400K|   505   (0)|
|*  3 |    BITMAP INDEX STORAGE FAST FULL SCAN| BI_T1_OWNER |        |            |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   3 - storage(("OWNER" LIKE '%XYZXYZ%' AND "OWNER" IS NOT NULL))
       filter(("OWNER" LIKE '%XYZXYZ%' AND "OWNER" IS NOT NULL))

So, as you see the execution plan sure shows a FAST FULL SCAN on a BITMAP INDEX segment, which happens to be on Exadata STORAGE.

Also, you see a storage() predicate applied on the line 3 of the execution plan, which means that Oracle will attempt to use a smart scan predicate offload – but this can’t always be done!

So, you can’t really determine whether a smart scan happened during execution just by looking into the execution plan, you should really check some V$SESSION statistics too. That’s where my Snapper script becomes handy.

I started Snapper on my session just before running the above query. The “smart table scan” and “smart index scan” performance counters are updated right after Oracle has opened the segment header and determines, from the number of blocks in the segment, whether to call the smart scan codepath or not. In other words, the smart scan counters are inremented in the beginning of the segment scan.

The output is following (some irrelevant counters are stripped for brevity):


@snapper all 5 1 "301"
Sampling SID 301 with interval 5 seconds, taking 1 snapshots...
setting stats to all due to option = all

-- Session Snapper v3.52 by Tanel Poder @ E2SN ( http://tech.e2sn.com )

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    SID, USERNAME  , TYPE, STATISTIC                                                 ,     HDELTA, HDELTA/SEC,    %TIME, GRAPH
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read total IO requests                           ,         13,        2.6,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read total multi block requests                  ,          4,         .8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read requests optimized                          ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read total bytes optimized                       ,      8.19k,      1.64k,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read total bytes                                 ,      4.63M,     925.7k,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell physical IO interconnect bytes                       ,     10.02k,         2k,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical reads                                            ,        565,        113,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical reads cache                                      ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical reads direct                                     ,        564,      112.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read IO requests                                 ,         13,        2.6,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, physical read bytes                                       ,      4.63M,     925.7k,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, db block changes                                          ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell physical IO bytes eligible for predicate offload     ,      4.62M,    924.06k,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell physical IO interconnect bytes returned by smart scan,      1.82k,      364.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell blocks processed by cache layer                      ,        564,      112.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell blocks processed by txn layer                        ,        564,      112.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell blocks processed by index layer                      ,        564,      112.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell blocks helped by minscn optimization                 ,        564,      112.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell index scans                                          ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, index fast full scans (full)                              ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, index fast full scans (direct read)                       ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, bytes sent via SQL*Net to client                          ,        334,       66.8,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, bytes received via SQL*Net from client                    ,        298,       59.6,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client                         ,          2,         .4,
    301, TANEL     , STAT, cell flash cache read hits                                ,          1,         .2,
    301, TANEL     , TIME, hard parse elapsed time                                   ,     1.17ms,    233.8us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , TIME, parse time elapsed                                        ,      1.5ms,    300.2us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , TIME, DB CPU                                                    ,       11ms,      2.2ms,      .2%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , TIME, sql execute elapsed time                                  ,     82.2ms,    16.44ms,     1.6%, |@         |
    301, TANEL     , TIME, DB time                                                   ,    84.36ms,    16.87ms,     1.7%, |@         |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, enq: KO - fast object checkpoint                          ,    16.18ms,     3.24ms,      .3%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, gc cr grant 2-way                                         ,      223us,     44.6us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, gc current grant 2-way                                    ,      136us,     27.2us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, cell smart index scan                                     ,    56.04ms,    11.21ms,     1.1%, |@         |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, SQL*Net message to client                                 ,        7us,      1.4us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, SQL*Net message from client                               ,      4.42s,   884.47ms,    88.4%, |@@@@@@@@@ |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, cell single block physical read                           ,      541us,    108.2us,      .0%, |          |
    301, TANEL     , WAIT, events in waitclass Other                                 ,     2.22ms,    443.2us,      .0%, |          |
--  End of Stats snap 1, end=2011-03-13 19:36:31, seconds=5

As you see from the above “cell index scans” statistic – indeed one index segment was scanned using the cell smart scan method.

So, I would rather call this feature “smart segment scan” to reflect that smart scan can scan more than just tables…

I guess one of the reasons why few people have seen smart bitmap index scans in action is that (single-column) bitmap indexes tend to be small. Smaller than corresponding table segments and B-tree index segments. On partitioned tables they’re much more likely going to be under the “_small_table_threshold” calculation which is used for determining whether to do a direct path full segment scan or not (yes, the _small_table_threshold applies to fast full index scan and fast full bitmap index scan too, not just table scans). So, it’s likely that Oracle chooses to do a regular, buffered full bitmap segment scan and thus won’t even consider using smart scan (as smart scans require direct path reads).

By the way – the direct path read (or not) decision is done per segment – not per object (like a table or index). So if you have 10 partitions in a table (or index), half of them are large, half are smaller, then Oracle may end up using direct path reads (and smart scan) on 5 of them and buffered (dumb) scan on the other 5. If you run something like Snapper on the session, then you’d see the smart scan counters go up by 5 only. As written above, Oracle decides whether to do direct path reads (and smart scan) right after opening the header block of a segment (partition) and reading out how many blocks this partition’s segment has below HWM.

The above applied to serial direct path reads – the Parallel Execution slaves should always read using direct path mode, right? …. Wrong :)

Well, partially wrong… In 11.2.0.2, if the parallel_degree_policy = manual, then yes, PX slaves behave like usual and always force a direct path read (and try to use a smart scan). However, with parallel_degree_policy = AUTO, which is the future of PX auto-management, Oracle can decide to do a buffered parallel scan instead, again disabling the use of smart scan…

One more note – I didn’t say anything about whether you should or should not use (bitmap) indexes on Exadata, it’s an entirely different discussion. I just brought out that the smart scan is used for scanning table segments, B-tree index segments and bitmap index segments if conditions are right.

And in the end I have to say…. that even with this evidence you can’t be fully sure that a smart scan was used throughout the entire segment, but more about this in the book and perhaps in a later blog article. We have interesting times ahead ;-)

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Exadata Training – I’ll be speaking at the 1-day UKOUG Exadata Special Event on 18th April

Hi all,

As my frequent readers know, I have promised to not travel anymore as it’s just too much hassle compared to the benefit of being “there”. This is why I’m going to fly to London on Monday, 18th April to speak at the UKOUG Exadata Special Event. This event is just too sexy to be missed, so I made an exception (the last one, I promise!)… and it’s probably going to be warmer there as well compared to where I am now :-)

I will be talking about what’s been my focus area for last year or so – Oracle Exadata Performance.

Dan Norris and Alex Gorbachev will be speaking there too, so it should end up being a pretty awesome event!

More details here:

My abstract is following:

#000000; font-family: Times; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; font-size: medium;">#333333; font-family: arial,sans-serif; text-align: left; font-size: small;">Understanding Exadata Performance: Metrics and Wait Events
#000000; font-family: Times; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; font-size: medium;">#333333; font-family: arial,sans-serif; text-align: left; font-size: small;">

In order to systematically troubleshoot and optimize Exadata performance, one must understand the meaning of its performance metrics.

This session provides a deep technical walkthrough of how Exadata IO and smart scans work and how to use relevant metrics for troubleshooting related performance issues. We will review both Exadata database and cell-level metrics, cell wait events and tools useful for troubleshooting. We will also look into metrics related to Exadata Hybrid Columnar Compression and the cell Flash Cache usage.

P.S. The reason why I called this post “Exadata Training” is that you’ll learn some real world practical stuff there… as opposed to the marketing material (and marketing material copy material) overdose out there… ;-)

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Oracle Exadata Performance series – Part 1: Should I use Hugepages on Linux Database Nodes?

There was a question in LinkedIn forum about whether Linux Hugepages should be used in Oracle Exadata Database layer, as they aren’t enabled by default during ACS install. I’m putting my answer into this blog entry – apparently LinkedIn forums have a limit of 4000 characters per reply… (interestingly familiar number, by the way…:)

So, I thought that it’s time to start writing my Oracle Exadata Performance series articles what I’ve planned for a while… with some war stories from the field, some stuff what I’ve overcome when researching for writing the Expert Oracle Exadata book etc.

I’ve previously published an article about Troubleshooting Exadata Smart Scan performance and some slides from my experience with VLDB Data Warehouse migrations to Exadata.

Here’s the first article (initially planned as a short response in LinkedIn, but it turned out much longer though):

As far as I’ve heard, the initial decision to not enable hugepages by default was that the hugepages aren’t flexible & dynamic enough – you’ll have to always configure the hugepages at OS level to match your desired SGA size (to avoid wastage). So, different shops may want radically different SGA sizes (larger SGA for single-block read oriented databases like transactional/OLTP or OLAP cubes), but smaller SGA for smart scan/parallel scan oriented DWs. If you configure 40GB of hugepages on a node, but only use 1GB of SGA, then 39GB memory is just reserved, not used, wasted – as hugepages are pre-allocated. AMM, using regular pages, will only use the pages what it touches, so there’s no memory wastage due to any pre-allocation issues…

So, Oracle chose to use an approach which is more universal and doesn’t require extra OS level configuration (which isn’t hard at all though if you pay attention, but not all people do). So, less people will end up in trouble with their first deployments although they might not be getting the most out of their hardware.

However, before enabling hugepages “because it makes things faster” you should ask yourself what exact benefit would they bring you?

There are 3 main reasons why hugepages may be useful in Linux:

1) Smaller kernel memory usage thanks to less PTEs thanks to larger pagesizes

This means less pagetable entries (PTEs) and less kernel memory usage. The bigger your SGA and the more processes you have logged on, the bigger the memory usage.

You can measure this in your case – just “grep Page /proc/meminfo” and see how big portion of your RAM has been used by “PageTables”. Many people have blogged about this, but Kevin Closson’s blog is probably the best source to read about this:

2) Lower CPU usage due to less TLB misses in CPU and soft page-fault processing when accessing SGA.

It’s harder to measure this on Linux with standard tools, although it is sure possible (on Solaris you can just run prstat -m to get microstate accounting and look into TFL,DFL,TRP stats).

Anyway, the catch here is that if you are running parallel scans and smart scans, then you don’t access that much of buffer cache in SGA at all, all IOs or smart scan result-sets are read directly to PGAs of server processes – which don’t use large pages at all, regardless of whether hugepages for SGA have been configured or not. There are some special cases, like when a block clone has to be rolled back for read consistency, you’ll have to access some undo blocks via buffer cache… but again this should be a small part of total workload.

So, in a DW, which using mostly smarts scans or direct path reads, there won’t be much CPU efficiency win from large pages as you bypass buffer cache anyway and use small pages of private process memory. All the sorting, hashing etc all happens using small pages anyway. Again I have to mention that on (my favorite OS) Solaris it is possible to configure even PGAs to use large pages (via _realfree_heap_pagesize_hint parameter) … so it’ll be interesting to see how this would help DW workloads on the Exadata X2-8 monsters which can run Solaris 11.

3) Lock SGA pages into RAM so they won’t be paged out when memory shortage happens (for whatever reason).

Hugepages are pre-allocated and never paged out. So, when you have extreme memory shortage, your SGAs won’t be paged out “by accident”. Of course it’s better to ensure that such memory shortages won’t happen – configure the SGA/PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET sizes properly and don’t allow third party programs consume crazy amounts of memory etc. Of course there’s the lock_sga parameter in Oracle which should allow to do this on Linux with small pages too, but first I have never used it on Linux so I don’t know whether it works ok at all and also in 11g AMM perhaps the mlock() calls aren’t supported on the /dev/shm files at all (haven’t checked and don’t care – it’s better to stay away from extreme memory shortages). Read more about how the AMM MEMORY_TARGET (/dev/shm) works from my article written back in 2007 when 11g came out ( Oracle 11g internals – Automatic Memory Management ).

So, the only realistic win (for DW workload) would be the reduction of kernel pagetables structure size – and you can measure this using PageTables statistic in /proc/meminfo. Kevin demonistrated in his article that 500 connections to an instance with ~8 GB SGA consisting of small pages resulted in 7 GB of kernel pagetables usage, while the usage with large pages (still 500 connections, 8 GB SGA) was about 265 MB. So you could win over 6 GB of RAM, which you can then give to PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET or to further inrease SGA. The more processes you have connected to Oracle, the more pagetable space is used… Similarly, the bigger the SGA is, the more pagetable space is used…

This is great, but the tradeoff here is manageability and some extra effort you have to put in to always check whether the large pages actually got used or not. After starting up your instance, you should really check whether the HugePages_Free in /proc/meminfo shrank and HugePages_Rsvd increased (when instance has just started up and Oracle hasn’t touched all the SGA pages yet, some pages will show up as Rsvd – reserved).

With a single instance per node this is trivial – you know how much SGA you want and pre-allocate the amount of hugepages for that. If you want to increase the SGA, you’ll have to shut down the instance and increase the Linux hugepages setting too. This can be done dynamically by issuing a command like echo N > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages (where N is the number of huge pages), BUT in real life this may not work out well as if Linux kernel can’t free enough small pages from right physical RAM locations to consolidate 2 or 4 MB contiguous pages, the above command may fail to create the requested amount of new hugepages.

And this means you should restart the whole node to do the change. Note that if you increase your SGA larger to the number of hugepages (or you forget to increase the memlock setting in /etc/security/limits.conf accordingly) then your instance will silently just use the small pages, while all the memory pre-allocated for hugepages stays reserved for hugepages and is not usable for anything else!).

So, this may become more of a problem when you have multiple database instances per cluster node or you expect to start up and shut down instances on different nodes based on demand (or when some cluster nodes fail).

Long story short – I do configure hugepages in “static” production environments, to save kernel memory (and some CPU time for OLTP type environments using buffer cache heavily), also on Exadata. However for various test and development environments with lots of instances per server and constant action, I don’t bother myself (and the client) with hugepages and make everyone’s life easier… Small instances with small number of connections won’t use that many PTEs anyway…

For production environments with multiple database instances per node (and where failovers are expected) I would take the extra effort to ensure that whatever hugepages I have preallocated, won’t get silently wasted because an instance wants more SGA than the available hugepages can accommodate. You can do this by monitoring /proc/meminfo’s HugePage entries as explained above. And remember, the ASM instance (which is started before DB instances) will also grab itself some hugepages when it starts!

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