Tuning

double trouble

In the latest Quiz Night, I asked how you could make a query more efficient by changing a two table join into a three table join – with the clue that my third table was a repeat of the first table. Gary Myers, in comment 4,  provided the type of answer I was looking for. Sometimes [...]

Oracle Exadata V2 - Flash Cache

One of the things I didn’t really talk about in my first post on Exadata was the flash cache component of the storage servers. They are a key component of the “OLTP” claims that Oracle is making for the platform. So let’s talk about the hardware first. The storage servers have 4 of the Sun Flash Accelerator F20 PCIe cards. These cards hold 96G each for a total of 384G on each storage server. That’s well over a terabyte on the smallest quarter rack configuration. Here’s what they look like:

Note that they are only installed in the storage servers and not in the database servers. The cards are usually configured exclusively as Flash Cache, but can optionally have a portion defined as a “ram disk”.

Oracle has a White Paper here:

Exadata Smart Flash Cache and the Sun Oracle Database Machine

This white paper was published in late 2009 and it is specific to V2. It has some good information and is well worth reading. One of the comments I found interesting was the discussion of carving a piece of the Flash Cache out as a “disk”. Here’s the quote:

Cursor Sharing 3

Here’s a simple piece of code demonstrating an irritating problem. I’ve created a table, a function-based index, collected stats (without histograms), and then run a query that should use that index – but doesn’t. execute dbms_random.seed(0) create table t1 as with generator as ( select --+ materialize rownum id from dual connect by rownum <= [...]

Fun with Oracle Exadata V2

Well I’ve been holed up playing with an Exadata V2 machine for the past several weeks. Wow. Very interesting technology.

I must say that I believe the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer is a game changer and I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see this as a standard feature a few years from now. What that means for other storage vendors is unclear at this point. So for this first post on the topic let me just describe the configuration (and some potential upgrades).

The basic architecture consists of a set of database severs and a set of storage servers.

Database Servers:

  • Sun x4170 (1RU 64x server)
  • 2 - Quad-core Intel Xeon E5540 2.53GHz processors
  • 72G Ram (18×4G Dimms - max of 144G using 8G DIMMs)
  • Dual-Port QDR InfiniBand Host Channel Adapter
  • HBA with 512MB Battery Backed Write Cache (only for internal disks???)
  • 4 - 146G internal drives (SAS 10,000 RPM)
  • dual hot swappable power supplies
  • no spare/empty slots!

Here’s what the Database Servers look like:

Storage Servers:

  • Sun x4275 (2RU 64x server)
  • 2 - Quad-core Intel Xeon E5540 (2.53GHz) processors
  • 24G Ram
  • Dual-Port QDR InfiniBand Host Channel Adapter
  • HBA with 512MB Battery Backed Write Cache (only for internal disks???)
  • dual hot swappable power supplies
  • 4 - 96G Sun Flash PCIe Cards (total of 384 GB)
  • 12 - 600 GB 15,000 RPM SAS or 2 TB 7,200 RPM SATA


Here’s what the Storage Servers look like:

Systematic Oracle Latch Contention troubleshooting

As an Oracle DBA, developer or performance analyst, you may have run into what is termed "latch contention" at various points. So what exactly is a "latch" and why do we have contention on this "latch". In this article, we will take an in-depth look at latches and how we determine and resolve such contention. Whether you are a newbie or an experienced old-timer, we hope this article will cast a little more light on this ill-understood subject.
Read the article here:
 http://tech.e2sn.com/oracle/troubleshooting/latch-contention-troubleshooting
 

Non-trivial performance problems

Gwen Shapira has written an article about a good example of a non-trivial performance problem.

I’m not talking about anything advanced here (such as bugs or problems arising at OS/Oracle touchpoint) but that sometimes the root cause of a problem (or at least the reason why you notice this problem now) is not something deeply technical or related to some specific SQL optimizer feature or a configuration issue. Instead of focusing on the first symptom you see immediately, it pays off to take a step back and see how the problem task/application/SQL is actually used by the users or client applications.

In other words, talk to the users, ask how exactly they experience the problem and then drill down from there.

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Oracle Latch Contention Troubleshooting

I wrote a latch contention troubleshooting article for IOUG Select journal last year (it was published earlier this year). I have uploaded this to tech.E2SN too, I recommend you to read it if you want to become systematic about latch contention troubleshooting:

http://tech.e2sn.com/oracle/troubleshooting

I’m working on getting the commenting & feedback work at tech.E2SN site too, but for now you can comment here at this blog entry…

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Session Snapper v3.11 – bugfix update – now ASH report works properly on Oracle 10.1 too

This is an updated version of Snapper, which works ok on Oracle 10.1 now as well (9i support is coming some time in the future :)

Thanks to Jamey Johnston for sending me the fix info (and saving me some time that way :)

So if you have some problems with Snapper on Oracle 10.1, please make sure you have the latest version v3.11, which you can get from here:

http://tech.e2sn.com/oracle-scripts-and-tools/session-snapper

The output below is from Snapper 3.11 on Oracle 10.1.0.5, the ASH columns in the bottom part of the output are displayed correctly now:

Oracle Session Snapper v3.10

Hi all, long time no see!  =8-)

Now as I’m done with the awesome Hotsos Symposium (and the training day which I delivered) and have got some rest, I’ll start publishing some of the cool things I’ve been working on over the past half a year or so.

The first is Oracle Session Snapper version 3!

There are some major improvements in Snapper 3, like ASH style session activity sampling!

When you troubleshoot a session’s performance (or instance performance) then the main things you want to know first are very very simple:

  1. Which SQL statements are being executed
  2. What are they doing, are they working on CPU or waiting.
  3. If waiting, then for what

Often this is enough for troubleshooting what’s wrong. For example, if a session is waiting for a lock, then wait interface will show you that. If a single SQL statement is taking 99% of total response time, the V$SESSION (ASH style) samples will point out the problem SQL and so on. Simple stuff.

However there are cases where you need to go beyond wait interface and use V$SESSTAT (and other) counters and even take a “screwdriver” and open Oracle up from outside by stack tracing :-)

When I wrote the first version of Snapper for my own use some 4-5 years ago I wrote it mainly having the “beyond wait interface” part in mind. So I focused on V$SESSTAT and various other counters and left the basic troubleshooting to other tools. I used to manually sample V$SESSION/V$SESSION_WAIT a few times in a row to get a rough overview of what a session was doing or some other special-purpose scripts.

However after Snapper got more popular and I started getting some feedback about it I saw the need for covering more with Snapper, not just the “beyond wait interface” part, but also the “wait interface” and “which SQL” part too.

A Free afternoon seminar in Singapore (24th Feb)

If you are in Singapore and have 24th Feb afternoon available then you can register and join a free Oracle performance troubleshooting seminar I’m doing in Singapore Management University’s (SMU) campus.

The seminar will be about:

  • Systematic Oracle Performance Troubleshooting
  • Identifying performance troublemakers
  • Understanding execution plans

The date is Wednesday, 24th Feb

The seminar time is from 15:30-19:00 (don’t be late)

Registration and more details are here:

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