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18c XE–running locally

There’s already a few blog posts out there, showing people (easily) getting their 18c XE instance downloaded, installed and running, so I won’t rehash that here.

For the majority of people, I’d imagine they’ll have their XE instance running on a small box and connecting to it from “afar”, namely, their own PC or an application server or similar.

But for those of you, especially in these early stages of release, who like me, want to just jump right into our VM’s and the like, and connect to the XE instance directly, there’s perhaps one thing we omitted as part of the automated install that might catch you out.

The default tnsnames.ora will look something like:

18c XE is live!

Just a quick post because this is perhaps what I think is one of the biggest game changers for the Oracle Database.

18c Express Edition (18x XE) is now available for general use. For those people with experience with 11g XE, this might not seem to be a big deal, but there is one crucial difference.

Unlike 11g XE, the new version has virtually no restrictions on the functionality offered by the database. And yes, we are talking Enterprise Edition features and options here.

So if you want to explore:

  • In-memory
  • Multi-tenant
  • Partitioning
  • Text

etc etc etc, the list goes on, then these will all be there in 18c XE for you.

And the product installs with just a couple of commands.

OpenWorld Wednesday – step right up!

If you’ve read my two previous posts on the OpenWorld schedule, you’re probably expecting a huge long list of sessions to pique your interest.

But no! There’s only ONE you need on your list Smile

The Fast Lane to Database Success [TIP4094]
Connor McDonald, Developer Advocate for SQL, Oracle
Wednesday, Oct 24, 4:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. | Moscone West – Room 3009

Compressed LOB–my table got bigger?

We had an interesting question on AskTOM the other day about LOB compression. Someone was very concerned that after applying compression to the LOBS in the column of their table, the table actually got larger! Cue much confusion and panic, but after a little exploration, the explanation was pretty simple.

By default, when you create a LOB column in a table, the default storage definition is ENABLE STORAGE IN ROW. As per the documentation:

If you enable storage in row, then the LOB value is stored in the row (inline) if its length is less than approximately 4000 bytes minus system control information

Faking Histograms

This is a short index of articles I’ve written on how to create the different types of histogram that the optimizer uses:

LOBs vs Data – when compression occurs

Just a quick tip for SECUREFILE lobs.

You may be familiar with basic compression on data in tables. It is a dictionary attribute of the table, which is then taken into account when you perform:

  • a SQL Loader direct load, or
  • an INSERT with the APPEND hint, or
  • a bulk bind INSERT in PLSQL using the APPEND_VALUE hint.

Whichever of the above you perform does not really matter – the key thing is that when you set the COMPRESS attribute on a table, this only applies on operations subsequent to the moment at which you altered the table. It does not compress the existing data. Hence when you alter a table to add the attribute, it is instantaneous.

ODC Appreciation Day–LOB compression

LOBs tend to be large. Well duh…it’s right there in the name! “Large Object”. So one of the cool things I like with the SECUREFILE option in recent releases of Oracle Database is the ability to compress LOBs. Here’s a quick demo of that in action:

OpenWorld Tuesday … yep, still screwed

Well…I’m only planning day 2 of OpenWorld and already I’ve pretty much given up on being able to see all the talks that I want to see Smile The challenge for me will be trying to coax those people that are inside Oracle to give me a synopsis of their talk after the event. That is probably my best hope here.

In any event, if you’re a database person like me, here’s my tips for what I’ll be trying to sneak into on Tuesday.

Tuesday morning

An Insider’s Guide to Oracle Autonomous OLTP Database Cloud [TRN3979]
Maria Colgan, master product manager at Oracle Corporation , Oracle
Robert Greene, Senior Director, Product Management, Oracle
Tuesday, Oct 23, 11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. | Moscone West – Room 3003

which overlaps with

Partial Indexes–Take Care With Truncate

Partial indexes are a very cool feature that came along with Oracle 12c. The capability at partition level to control index existence allows for a couple of obvious use cases:

1) You index the data in recent partitions only, because small amounts of data are aggressively searched by applications and/or users, but not the older data because the queries for older data are either less frequent or are more analytical in nature.

Easy as pi…. hole.

A slight digression from my normal database-focussed content today Smile

In internet bandwidth and latency strapped Perth (Western Australia), every last drop of internet counts. Recently I stumbled upon this blog post by Troy Hunt about using a Raspberry Pi to serve as a local DNS to filter out unnecessary content. Personally, I don’t care about the content as such (I don’t like ads, but I do acknowledge that they are generally a necessary “evil”), but for me it is about getting the most performance out of my lowly internet connection until the technology evolves in Australia.